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Iraq

The Takeaway

New Revelations on Desert Storm, Iraq and the Soviet Union

Thursday, January 20, 2011

Twenty years after the United States launched Operation Desert Storm, newly-declassified archival transcripts give us a fresh look at the first Iraq War — with more than a few surprises. The documents reveal that as the U.S. was bearing down on Iraq in February 1991, Hussein turned to Gorbachev, hoping the Moscow leader would help him convince the United States to retreat. 

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The Takeaway

Military Life: When the Men are Gone

Thursday, January 20, 2011

Military wife Siobhan Fallon has a new collection of loosely connected short stories that’s been getting rave reviews. It’s called “You Know When The Men Are Gone.” She explains the truth behind living as a military spouse. Her husband Major K.C. Evans is a graduate of West Point, he’s been married to Siobhan for seven years, and has been deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan three times during their marriage.

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The Takeaway

Suicide Bombing Kills 50 in Tikrit, Iraq

Tuesday, January 18, 2011

At least 50 people are dead following a suicide bombing at a police recruiting center in Northern Iraq. The targeted recruits were lined up to try to get the first of two thousand new police jobs. The New York Times' John Leland is in Baghdad with the latest on the bloody attack and what this means as the U.S. prepares to withdraw from the country.

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The Takeaway

Tamara Chalabi on Family, History, and Nation

Tuesday, January 18, 2011

When many of us hear the name Chalabi, we think of Ahmed Chalabi, the controversial Iraqi politician who advised the U.S. government to go to war. But his daughter Tamara Chalabi wants the world to know that the Chalabi name is bigger that just her father. Her new book, “Late for Tea at the Deer Palace,” brings her family tree to life, from the time of the Ottoman Empire to today’s post-war reconstruction period.

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The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: The Media's Role in Wartime, Morning Headlines

Tuesday, January 04, 2011

There are iconic moments in every war. Remember the toppling of the statue of Saddam Hussein? How did this media event become became a symbol of victory?

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The Takeaway

Iraqis Reflect on Tumultuous 2010

Monday, December 27, 2010

President Obama announced the end of U.S. combat operations in Iraq last August, but 2010 was still a tumultuous year in the region. How will Iraqis remember 2010? And what do they hope for in the year to come? Dr. Lubna Naji, a recent graduate of Baghdad Medical School, joins us to reflect on the past year and to share what she looks forward to in 2011.

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The Takeaway

A Military Wife's Reflection on 2010 in Iraq

Monday, December 27, 2010

2010 was a tumultuous year in Iraq. The U.S. announced the end of combat operations last August, but with some 50,000 troops still in-country, the future of the region remains difficult to predict. Caitlin Waters, proud Army wife and mother of two, has joined us over the past year to discuss her husband's service in Iraq. Caitlin joins us once again to reflect on the year in Iraq.

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The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: Iraq Gets Government, Morning Headlines

Wednesday, December 22, 2010

Meet the new government of Iraq. Is it the same as the old one? It's round two of the post-Saddam era.

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The Takeaway

As America Withdraws from Iraq, So Does American Money

Monday, December 06, 2010

As America slowly withdraws from Iraq, so does a lot of U.S. financial support. The result: interpreters and thousands of others who currently depend on the U.S. presence for their livelihood will likely be out of work. How will they make the transition? Jack Healy, reporter for our partner The New York Times, joins us for more on the story.  

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Back from Iraq

Friday, November 26, 2010

David Finkel, national enterprise editor of The Washington Post and author of The Good Soldiers, talks about spending time with U.S. soldiers in Iraq and upon return after their service.

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The Takeaway

A Military Wife On Post-Combat Iraq

Friday, November 19, 2010

Frequent Takeaway guest Caitlin Waters joins us to talk about her husband Mark's experiences, as one of the U.S. soldiers still stationed in Iraq after the official end of Operation Iraqi Freedom. She reacts to General Jeffrey Buchanan's assessment of the war in that country earlier on the show — specifically his comments on the idea of troops like her husband needing to stay longer in Iraq to support the fragile government there.   

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The Takeaway

The Non-Combat Life for American Troops in Iraq

Friday, November 19, 2010

Nearly three months after the official end of Operation Iraqi Freedom, 50,000 troops remain in the country. The schedule for withdrawal has the troops leaving in 2011, but Defense Secretary Robert Gates recently said that American forces might stay longer, if Iraq's government requested an extension. 

Brigadier General Jeffrey Buchanan talks to us about life for the soldiers now, and what it might mean if Baghdad asks U.S. forces to stay.

 

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The Takeaway

In Iraq, Will The U.S. Stay Or Go?

Wednesday, November 10, 2010

There may be a change for the plan to completely withdraw all U.S. troops from Iraq by the end of 2011. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates said the U.S. would be open to discussions of an extended stay in Iraq, if asked by the Iraqi authorities. "In terms of the future strategic relationship beyond the end of 2011, I would say that the initiative clearly needs to come from the Iraqis," Gates told reporters yesterday in Kuala Lumpur. Is the U.S. legacy there going to be even longer than we imagined? 

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The Takeaway

Iraqi Christians Memorialize Victims of Qaida Massacre

Monday, November 08, 2010

Yesterday, Christians in Iraq held a mass to memorialize the victims of an al-Qaida massacre at a Catholic church in Baghdad two Sundays ago, in which 58 people died. Here in the U.S., Iraqi Christians held services in local churches.  Many are worried that Christians in Iraq have become a new, favored target of Islamic militants.

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The Takeaway

Bloodbath in Baghdad Church Leaves at Least 41 Dead

Monday, November 01, 2010

Militants believed to be associated with the Islamic State of Iraq, a fundamentalist group associated with Al-Qaida in Mesopotamia, attacked the Iraqi stock exchange yesterday then fled to a nearby church where they took nearly 100 hostages in what would become one of the worst bloodbaths in recent history. At least 52 hostages and Iraqi policemen were killed, many of whom died when a militant blew himself up. Five militants were also slain, and fifty people were wounded.

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The Takeaway

Tareq Aziz, Top Saddam Hussein Aide, Sentenced to Death

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

An Iraqi court has sentenced Tareq Aziz, the diplomatic face of Saddam Hussein's Baathist government, to death. The former deputy prime minister and foreign minister was convicted of persecution against members of Prime Minister Nuri Kamal al-Maliki's religious Shiite Dawa Party during Saddam's regime. Aziz was already serving prison sentences for crimes against humanity and the forced displacement of Kurds in northern Iraq. Jim Muir, the BBC's Baghdad correspondent, reports live from Iraq.

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The Takeaway

Torture and Abuse Revealed in WikiLeaks Documents

Monday, October 25, 2010

WikiLeaks released 400,000 documents on Friday that reveal cases of torture and abuse of detainees by Iraqi security forces. The reports also increase the number of civilian casualites in the war. WikiLeaks editor-in-chief, Julian Assange is the man at the center of this controversy, as he faces accusations that he has put U.S. troops and Iraqi civilians in danger. Also being heavily criticized is The New York Times, which published the reports.

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The Takeaway

Iraq, Torture and the United Nations

Monday, October 25, 2010

The whistle-blowing site WikiLeaks has released a second set of documents out of Iraq — the “Iraq War Logs.” While the nearly 400,000 field reports detailing events seen and heard by the U.S. military troops on the ground in Iraq offer little information about the inner-workings of American detention facilities, they show that the U.S. military was not only aware of torture carried out by the Iraqi army and police — and perhaps even condoned and facilitated it.

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Features

Iraqi Refugee Art Exhibit Shows ‘Common Humanity’

Monday, October 25, 2010

The exhibit was curated by Mel Lehman, director and founder of a group focused on building understanding between the West and Arab and Muslim worlds.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: Gays & Lesbians in Iraq

Thursday, October 21, 2010

There are no exact figures on the number of gays and lesbians who have been killed in Iraq since the 2003 invasion, though a 2009 Human Rights Watch report puts the number “in the hundreds.” On today’s Underreported segment, freelance journalist Michael Luongo discusses what life is like for gays and lesbians there, from underground clubs in Baghdad and hiding in safe houses, to the constant threat of violent attacks from militia members. His four-part series on gay life in Iraq appears in the Gay City News.

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