Streams

 

 

Iraq

The New Yorker: Political Scene

Dexter Filkins and George Packer on the Iraqi elections.

Thursday, May 01, 2014

Dexter Filkins and George Packer on the Iraqi elections.

Comment

The Takeaway

Amid Votes, Violence Marks Iraqi Election

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

In the days before the nation's first election since American withdrawal, Iraqis have continued to face deadly violence. The election is being held amid tight security provided by hundreds of thousands troops and police.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Dexter Filkins: Covering War Distorts Everything

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

The New Yorker staff writer tells guest host Sarah Jessica Parker about his experiences covering war in Afghanistan, Pakistan and Iraq.

Comments [15]

The Takeaway

Iraqi Ambassador Gears Up for Boston Marathon

Thursday, April 03, 2014

When 36,000 runners in the year's Boston Marathon take to the starting line, Lukman Faily, Iraqi Ambassador to the U.S., will be among them. He says he's taking part in the run to to demonstrate his solidarity with Bostonians and his commitment to fighting terrorism.

Comments [2]

The New Yorker: Out Loud

George Packer and Dexter Filkins on the literature of the Iraq War.

Monday, March 31, 2014

George Packer and Dexter Filkins on the literature of the Iraq War.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

How Corruption, Incompetence, and Sectarianism Undermine Democracy in Iraq

Wednesday, March 05, 2014

Iraqi lawyer Zaid al-Ali argues that the poorly planned U.S. intervention destroyed the Iraqi state, creating a black hole that corrupt and incompetent members of the elite have made their own. He looks at what's happened to Iraq’s people, their government, and their nation’s since the United States-led invasion in 2003. His book The Struggle for Iraq’s Future: How Corruption, Incompetence, and Sectarianism Have Undermined Democracy looks at the many problems the country is dealing with: bombings, increasing sectarianism, and pervasive government corruption.

Comments [5]

The Brian Lehrer Show

McChrystal: "I Would Not Oppose Re-Instituting the Draft"

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Saying that the US armed forces should reflect the US population, General Stanley McChrystal, former commander of U.S. Forces in Afghanistan, offered support for the idea of re-instating the draft on the Brian Lehrer Show. He also discussed the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, even agreeing that the invasion of Iraq may have been one of the biggest foreign policy mistakes in U.S. history.

Comments [16]

The Takeaway

Iraq War Vets Reflect as Al Qaeda Rebounds

Monday, January 13, 2014

Al Qaeda flags now fly over Fallujah and Ramadi, two of the major conflict zones for American troops throughout the Iraq War. For U.S. veterans who fought in the region, that news is hard to hear. Marine Michael Zacchea suffered severe injuries in a fire-fight in 2004 during what is known as the second battle of Fallujah. Benjamin Busch served two combat tours in Iraq as a Marine Corps infantry officer. David Retske is a former UAV pilot who served in Iraq from 2004 to 2005. Together they reflect on Al Qaeda's resurgence. 

Comments [11]

The Takeaway

Al-Qaeda Aims to Inflame Sectarian Tensions

Monday, January 06, 2014

Al-Qaeda is remaking the map of the Middle East, or at least they want to. Anbar province has long been a center of Sunni Muslim insurgents, and is now becoming a base for Al-Qaeda's wider ambitions to inflame sectarian tensions. Patrick Cockburn, Middle East Correspondent for The Independent, weighs in on what's ahead for Iraq.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Extremists Capture Parts of Key Iraqi Cities

Friday, January 03, 2014

Sunni militants in Iraq have captured parts of two key cities in Anbar Province, one of the bloodiest battlegrounds in the Iraq War. Nearly a third of all the Americans killed in Iraq died fighting in Anbar. Tim Arango, Baghdad Bureau Chief for Takeaway partner The New York Times, discusses the conflict, and whether this week's bloodshed might escalate sectarian violence throughout the country.

Comment

Studio 360

Suzanne Opton's Soldiers

Friday, November 08, 2013

A decade ago, at the start of the war in Iraq, photographer Suzanne Opton began making portraits of soldiers. Instead of a man in uniform, Opton’s portraits capture the soldier’s head in a tight close-up, lying sideways on a plain dark surface. They feature soldiers in between tours in Iraq and Afghanistan ...

Slideshow: Suzanne Opton’s Soldiers

Comments [1]

World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

A resurgence of global terrorism?

Monday, September 30, 2013

A resurgence of global terrorism?

Comment

Radiolab

Always, Always There

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Two short tales: One about bad guys in a fishing village in Pakistan, the other about good guys in Baghdad. And the question is posed: in the long arc of time, which side prevails, those with the impulse to take or those with the impulse to give?

 

Read More

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Fight to Save Iraqis America Left Behind

Wednesday, September 04, 2013

Kirk W. Johnson tells why and how he started The List Project, which has helped more than 1,500 Iraqis who worked with Americans find refuge in America. In To Be a Friend Is Fatal, he writes of going to Iraq in January 2005, as USAID’s only Arabic-speaking American employee, and working alongside idealistic Iraqi translators who believed in the idea of a peaceful, democratic Iraq. Johnson also writes about how the violence, kidnapping, torture, and led him into a severe depression and PTSD.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Ethics and Fashion; Alan Alda and "Brains on Trial"; Love Survived WWII in Hungary; Kirk Johnson's List Project

Wednesday, September 04, 2013

Five months ago, a building collapse in Bangladesh killed more than 1,000 garment workers. We’ll find out how the fashion industry has been changing how overseas workers are treated. Alan Alda and neurologist Bea Luna talk about how developments in neuroscience could change criminal trials. We’ll hear one woman’s story of how her parents’ love survived war and the Holocaust. And Kirk Johnson describes going to Baghdad in 2005 with USAID, his struggles with depression and PTSD, and how he’s now trying to help Iraqis find refuge in the United States.

The Takeaway

C.I.A. Documents: U.S. Had Knowledge of 1980s Chemical Attacks in Iran

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

A new report from Foreign Policy says that the U.S. knew Saddam Hussein was planning to launch a chemical attack and still provided him with support. Rick Francona is retired Airforce Lt. Col. and a liaison officer in Baghdad during the 1980's. He joins The Takeaway to discuss his experience on the ground in Baghdad and why the U.S. would accept the use of chemical weapons.

Comment

The Takeaway

Two Veterans Separated by 30 Years Come to Terms With PTSD

Thursday, August 08, 2013

Years after the Vietnam War, PTSD is now a household term. Mary McGriff is a retired Captain in the United States Air Force. She served at Balad Air Force base in Iraq in 2004. Douglas Howell was a Marine Corpsman in Vietnam in 1966 and 1967. These are two veterans of two very different wars, and they are separated by nearly 30 years. Today they share their experience with PTSD.

Comments [11]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Asking the Veterans

Tuesday, August 06, 2013

Tom Tarantino, chief policy officer for Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, reports on the 2013 survey of IAVA members and what issues the veterans are facing. 

Comments [4]

The Takeaway

Is Stability Finally Coming to Iraq?

Thursday, August 01, 2013

Is stability finally coming to the nation of Iraq? That all depends on who you talk to. Things are considerably better for the government, but it's a time a different story on the streets. According to the United Nations Mission in Iraq, last month was the deadliest since April 2008. Jane Arraf, reporter in Baghdad for Al Jazeera English and the Christian Science Monitor, joins us to discuss this.

Comment

The Takeaway

Author and Veteran Kevin Powers Reflects on Memorial Day

Monday, May 27, 2013

From Erich Maria Remarque's "All Quiet on the Western Front" to Tim O'Brien's "The Things They Carried," the combat novel takes its readers right into the action, into the horrors of war. With his recent novel "The Yellow Birds," author and veteran Kevin Powers does for Iraq what Remarque did for World War I and O'Brien did for Vietnam. On this Memorial Day, Powers reflects on his fellow veterans, and the military personnel still serving today.

Comment