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Iran

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Oil and Extremism: The Prescient Caution of Justice William O. Douglas

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

WNYC

"We are heading up to one of the greatest crises, I think, in modern history." This prediction about oil and the Middle East was made in 1951 by none other than Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas at a Books and Authors Luncheon.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

David Sanger on American Foreign Policy

Friday, September 07, 2012

David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for the New York Times, WNYC contributor and author of Confront and Conceal: Obama's Secret Wars and Surprising Use of American Power, discusses his reporting on Middle East, how regional tensions are playing out, and American foreign policy towards the region. He also fact-checks one of the claims President Obama made in his convention speech last night. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Marjane Satrapi on "Chicken with Plums"

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Marjane Satrapi discusses writing and co-directing the new film “Chicken with Plums,” based on her graphic novel of the same name. The story begins in Teheran in 1958, when renowned musician Nasser Ali Khan has lost the will to live since his violin has been destroyed. Finding no instrument worthy of replacing it, he decides to confine himself to bed and wait for death. Through the film a poignant secret of his life comes to light, a story of love that inspired his genius and his music. “Chicken with Plums” opens August 17 at Lincoln Plaza and Angelika Film Center.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

David Sanger on Syria, Iran and Regional Conflict

Thursday, August 09, 2012

David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for the New York Times, WNYC contributor and author of Confront and Conceal: Obama's Secret Wars and Surprising Use of American Power, discusses the latest diplomatic efforts around the Syria crisis and where Iran and the rest of the region fit in.

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The Takeaway

Laundering Iranian Money, British Bank Violates U.S. Law

Tuesday, August 07, 2012

It’s largely against American law to do business with Iranian banks, but Standard Chartered broke those laws when they allowed some transactions with Iran to pass through New York.

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The Takeaway

Romney Voices Support For Israel

Monday, July 30, 2012

Mitt Romney has said he'd support an Israeli strike against Iran's nuclear program, but will it win him any votes in America? Meir Javedanfar, an Iranian Studies lecturer in Israel, thinks Obama will be tough to beat on Iran.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The History of the U.S. Conflict with Iran

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

David Crist, senior historian for the Department of Defense and author of The Twilight War: The Secret History of America's Thirty-Year Conflict With Iran, discusses the United States' relationship with Iran and the latest developments in the Middle East.

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The Takeaway

Netanyahu Blames Iran for Bulgaria Bus Bombing

Thursday, July 19, 2012

Bulgaria says it is likely that it was a suicide bomber who carried out an attack on a bus carrying Israeli tourists. At least six Israelis and a Bulgarian were killed, and more than 30 people injured. Israel's Prime Minister has blamed Iran and promised a firm response.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

David Sanger on Iran, Syria, More

Monday, July 09, 2012

Chief Washington correspondent for the New York Times and WNYC contributor David Sanger talks about the latest on the diplomatic relationship with Iran, the effects of economic sanctions and their impact on the oil markets. Plus the latest from Syria, Libya, and more.

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The Takeaway

Nicholas Kristof on the People of Iran

Thursday, July 05, 2012

For journalist, author, and two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Nicholas Kristof, one of the biggest mysteries about Iran was how the regime not only stayed in power, but remained relatively popular among the Iranian people during the Arab Spring. To find out, he took a road trip across Iran with two of his children, looking for an answer to that question.

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The Takeaway

Obama and Allies Impose Severe Sanctions on Iran

Monday, July 02, 2012

The American government has been trying to shut down Iran’s nuclear program for three and a half years. They’ve used diplomacy, sanctions, cyber warfare, and, yesterday, the Obama administration and its allies put in place the strictest and furthest reaching sanctions yet.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Meet 'Flame'

Friday, June 01, 2012

Wired senior reporter Kim Zetter discusses 'Flame,' the latest tool of cyberweaponry infecting Iranian computers.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Iran, Syria, and Mid-East Security Update

Thursday, May 31, 2012

The unrest in Syria implicates Iran-US-Israel relations, as does the news of the latest computer virus known as "flame." We check in on Iranian stability with Afshin Molavi, senior research fellow at the New America Foundation and former Tehran-based correspondent for the Washington Post.

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The Takeaway

Cyber Security Experts Discover "Flame," The Newest, Best Way to Spy on a Country

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

A Moscow-based cyber security team has discovered the most advanced computer program for spying ever – they say a nation wrote it to spy on the Middle East, though they don't know which nation specifically. They’re calling it “Flame.” Roel Schouwenberg, a senior policy analyst for Kaspersky Labs, the company that discovered Flame, explains exactly what makes this worm so special. And Kim Zetter, a senior writer at Wired Magazine, discusses what this means for the future of espionage and security.

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On The Media

Western Technology in Oppressive Regimes

Friday, May 04, 2012

Much of the hardware and software used by oppressive regimes to monitor foreign dissidents is manufactured in the west. Margaret Coker, Middle East Correspondent for the Wall Street Journal, talks to Bob about President Obama's recent Executive Order banning the sale of this technology to Iran and Syria.

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The Takeaway

Voting in Iran a 'Tragic Farce'

Tuesday, May 01, 2012

A long winter of heightened tensions between Israel, Iran and the United States seems to finally have thawed, on this first day of May. But while Iran’s international relations may be improving, the country's internal politics have become increasingly hard-line. Laura Secor is a contributor at The New Yorker. Her piece, "Election, Monitored," appears in the May 7 edition.

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: The GOP's Dumb Pivot to Foreign Affairs

Thursday, April 26, 2012

It's a bad sign for Republicans if their candidate is trying to focus the debate back on international security.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

North Korea's missile politics

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Governments in Seoul, Tokyo and Washington reacted angrily to the announcement last month of North Korea's impending rocket launch. But what are they really concerned about? Geoff Dyer, US diplomatic correspondent, and Christian Oliver, Seoul correspondent join Shawn Donnan to discuss Pyongyang's missile politics.

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The Takeaway

North Korea Prepares Long-Range Rocket, US Prepares Negotiations with Iran

Monday, April 09, 2012

We talk to BBC correspondent Damian Grammaticas, who was among a group of foreign journalists taken by train to North Korea's north-west coast to see the final preparations for the rocket launch, and the New York Times' Steven Erlanger explains the demands that the U.S. and its allies are planning before a new round of negotiations with Iran.

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The Takeaway

Richard Clarke on Stuxnet and Cyber-Security

Thursday, March 29, 2012

This story has all the trappings of a spy novel, or a James Bond film. Espionage. International intrigue. Underground nuclear development. It would make for quite a work of fiction...except that this story is true. In 2010, a little virus called Stuxnet caused severe damage to an Iranian uranium-enrichment facility, effectively delaying Iran’s nuclear capabilities for months or possibly years. It was long thought that Israel took the lead in developing Stuxnet, but our next guest thinks that the Untied States was the culprit. And while we Americans might be skilled in creating cyber-viruses, we might be completely unprepared when it comes to defending ourselves against them.  

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