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Internet Activism

WNYC News

So Verizon Won the Internet Wars—Now What?

Thursday, January 16, 2014

Verizon wants the internet to be more orderly - and more profitable. This week's major court decision against “net neutrality” is a big win for the company.

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WNYC News

Net Neutrality Blocked: What It Could Mean For You

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Tech entrepreneurs say a federal court ruling will have a profound and negative impact on the Internet. "You may find that your Internet service provider is functioning more like a cable company," says On The Media's Brooke Gladstone.

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New Tech City

New Tech City: Computer Fraud and Abuse Act: Is It Too Broad?

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Jordan Kovnot is the privacy fellow at the Fordham Center on Law and Information Policy.

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New Tech City

New Tech City: Internet Troll or Freedom Fighter?

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Internet troll Andrew Auernheimer (aka Weev) is facing up to 10 years in federal prison for breaching AT&T's servers.  On this week's New Tech City he explains why he believes his actions helped consumers and upheld American democratic ideals.

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New Tech City

Hackers Are Vigilantes, Cybersecurity Expert Says

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Cybersecurity expert Alan Paller says hackers and internet trolls like Andrew Auernheimer (aka Weev) are nothing more than vigilantes. 

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New Tech City

Internet Troll Weev: Full Interview

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Andrew Auernheimer (aka Weev) is a gray-hat hacker and self-described internet troll who is facing up to 10 years in prison for breaching AT&T's servers.

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The Takeaway

Creating a Shadow Internet in the Name of Freedom

Monday, June 13, 2011

As a rising tide of unrest swept across the Middle East this past Spring many authoritarian regimes in the region initially reacted by shutting down the Internet and social networking sites.

The tactic was used in Egypt, Libya and recently Syria. However, protesters have continued to risk their lives to broadcast stories of brutal repression and violence. Meanwhile, the United States has been working on creating a shadow mobile network, with the idea of providing a secure network for protesters.

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The Takeaway

A Reluctant Hero for Egyptian Protesters

Wednesday, February 09, 2011

Yesterday, 30 year old Google executive Wael Ghonim was released from an Egyptian prison yesterday after twelve days of imprisonment, during which time, he claims, he was kidnapped and held blindfolded by authorities. 

Hours later, in a live interview conducted on Egypt's DreamTV, Ghonim broke down in tears while seeing images of men killed in the riots. (Watch the interview after the jump.) His interview seems to have re-galvanized protesters who have taken to the streets in record numbers after two weeks of demonstrations.

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The Takeaway

Wael Ghonim: A New Kind of Revolutionary?

Tuesday, February 08, 2011

He thinks of himself as just another body among the faceless masses gathered in Cairo's Tahrir Square, demanding a new era in his nation's politics, and a better future for all the people of Egypt. Yet, it was a heartbreaking interview with Wael Ghonim, broadcast on one of Egypt's satellite channels last night, that drove thousands of Egyptians to march on their Parliament for the first time, refueling Egypt's two-week-old pro-democracy movement.

Ghonim, a marketing executive at Google, has become the face of the internet-based youth movement calling for the ouster of Egypt's autocratic leader, Hosni Mubarak. Using social networking tools like YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook, Ghonim helped inspire the protests that have brought a government thought to be stable to its knees, and became a symbol of that government's repression when he disappeared for twelve days.

 

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