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International Relations

The Takeaway

Obama, Biden Seek to Balance East and West

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

While Russia and Ukraine dominate the headlines, President Obama embarks on a long-awaited trip to Southeast Asia. As Vice President Biden practices Containment 2.0 with Russia in the West, can President Obama do the same with China in the East?

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The Takeaway

Russia's Neighbors on Edge Over Crimea Crisis

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

In defiance of the U.S. and Europe, Russian President Vladimir Putin has declared his intention to make Crimea a part of the Russian Federation. Latvian and Estonian diplomats tell us how their nations see the Crimea vote.

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The Takeaway

Another Cold War? Russia Can't Afford It

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

The economic climate of today's Russia is nothing like the Soviet Union's was two decades ago — and that could be the crucial factor that prevents the current conflict over Crimea from escalating.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Frontline's "Egypt in Crisis"

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Less than three years after the popular uprising that led to President Hosni Mubarak's ouster, and just one year after Egypt's first free and fair elections, the democratically elected government has been overthrown and the Egyptian military is running the state. Writer/producer Martin Smith looks at what went wrong and what happens next. Frontline’s new documentary “Egypt in Crisis” explores those questions. It premieres September 17, at 10:30 pm, on PBS.

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The Takeaway

CIA Finally Confirms Role in 1953 Iranian Coup

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

It's long been known that U.S. and British operatives were behind the 1953 Iranian coup, which overthrew the nation's Prime Minister, but only yesterday did the CIA officially confirm it. Malcolm Byrne, the director of the National Security Archives, which made these documents public for the first time,  joins The Takeaway to discuss these revelations.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

U.S. Foreign Policy: Lead By Example

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Richard Haass  president of the Council on Foreign Relations, former director of policy planning for the Department of State and author of Foreign Policy Begins at Home: The Case for Putting America's House in Order (Basic Books, 2013) says the U.S. needs to fix its problems at home to regain credibility abroad.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Hillary Clinton's Time as Secretary of State

Monday, March 18, 2013

BBC foreign correspondent Kim Ghattas gives an inside account of Hillary Clinton's time as secretary of state. Ghattas had unparalleled access to Clinton and her entourage for four years.

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The Takeaway

Mecca and the Modern Day Hajj

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Every year between two and three million Muslims converge on the city of Mecca for the hajj. The annual religious pilgrimage is one of the pillars of Islam. The hajj begins this week and author Basharat Peer reflects on his experience of going on the hajj last year.

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The Takeaway

Iran Threatens US Navy Carrier

Tuesday, January 03, 2012

Iran warned a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier to stay out of the Persian Gulf on Tuesday, just a day after Iran completed naval exercises in the Strait of Hormuz. In the latest episode of saber-rattling toward the West, Iran tested two short and medium range missiles on Monday. A U.S. Navy aircraft carrier moved into the area in response to the exercises. Iran's army chief threatened to attack the ship if it returns. Iran said during the drills that if the West imposed sanctions on its oil exports, it would close the Strait of Hormuz, the source of 40 percent of the world's oil shipments.

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The Takeaway

Pakistan Accused of Secretly Supporting Taliban

Wednesday, October 26, 2011

The increasingly fraught relationship between the United States and Pakistan is under even greater scrutiny after new revelations showing Pakistan has continually supported and trained the Taliban in Afghanistan for the last decade. A BBC investigation alleges that Pakistan has secretly armed and trained the enemy in Afghanistan while professing to be a U.S. ally. David Loyn, correspondent for the BBC, filed this report.

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The Takeaway

The Foreign Policy Implications of Gadhafi's Death

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Col. Moammar Gadhafi was killed this morning in his birthplace of Sirte as forces of the National Transitional Council swept the city, according to the leader of the Tripoli military council. The reports have not been confirmed outside of the NTC. Martin Indyk, former U.S ambassador to Israel, and director of the Foreign Policy Institute at the Brookings Institution, comments on how Gadhafi's reported death will shake up international relations in the region.

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The Takeaway

UN Reports Abuse at Afghan Prisons

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Detainees in prisons run by the Afghanistan National Police and the country's intelligence service are routinely abused and subjected to what a new report from the United Nations refers to as "systematic torture." The report details repeated beatings, electric shocks, the use of stress positions and the threat of sexual assault. It is unknown whether American officials were aware of or complicit in the abuse.

And here to explain what the implications these revelations are going to have on U.S.-Afghan relations is 

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The Takeaway

Myanmar to Release Thousands of Prisoners

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

The highly secretive and authoritarian nation of Myanmar announced on state-controlled television that it would grant amnesty to 6,300 prisoners. The announcement, which did not specify whether prisoners of conscience would be included in the general amnesty, came only a day after a State Department official indicated that Washington would be open to improving relations with Myanmar's new military-backed government that came to power in March. The prisoner releases could begin as soon as Wednesday.

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The Takeaway

American Hikers Freed from Iranian Prison

Thursday, September 22, 2011

The two Americans who have been kept in Iran's notorious Evin prison for the past two years were freed yesterday. Shane M. Bauer and Joshua F. Fattal, who were arrested by Iranian border guards in 2009 and sentenced to eight years in prison for illegal entry and espionage, were brought to Oman, where they await their return to the United States.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Chris Hedges on the Myth of Human Progress

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Chris Hedges, senior fellow at the Nation Institute, former foreign correspondent for the New York Times, and Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter, discusses his two decades of experience as a war correspondent, and examines the American empire at home and abroad. The World as It Is: Dispatches on the Myth of Human Progress looks at the constant struggle with the nature of war and its impact on human civilization.

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The Takeaway

What is Our State of Relations with Pakistan?

Wednesday, May 18, 2011

Two NATO helicopters allegedly crossed over into Pakistani air space and were shot at by Pakistani ground troops yesterday morning. This incident comes at a time when relations between Pakistan and the U.S. are extremely tense and fragile. Both countries need each other, but both would love to be less dependent on the other, and are trying to find ways to accomplish that. Teresita Schaffer, former U.S. ambassador to Sri Lanka, analyzes the relationship.

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The Takeaway

Pakistan's International Role After Bin Laden

Tuesday, May 10, 2011

It appears the U.S. is leering towards Pakistan with suspicious eyes after intelligence reports Osama bin Laden was most likely living in a compound in Abbottabad, for close to six years. The White House claims a healthy relationship with Pakistan is vital to U.S. national security. How will the relationship between the U.S. and Pakistan change after bin Laden's death — will it improve or deteriorate? And what will Pakistan's new role in the international community be? To help us answer those questions is Munir Akram, former Pakistani ambassador to the United Nations.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Anatol Lieven on Pakistan

Tuesday, May 03, 2011

Anatol Lieven, professor in the War Studies department at King’s College, London, and Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation talks about Pakistan’s increasing importance to south Asia and to the United States. He’ll discuss the rise of Islamic extremism and the Taliban in the area, and U.S. relations with Pakistan in the war on terror, the search and discovery of Osama bin Laden, and the war in Afghanistan. His latest book is Pakistan: A Hard Country.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Lost and Found In Russia

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Susan Richards looks at the transformation of Russia after the fall of communism. Lost and Found in Russia: Lives in the Post-Soviet Landscape reveals how the history of contemporary Russia is a portrait of a society in transition.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Armed Humanitarians

Monday, February 21, 2011

Nathan Hodge looks at how our failure to establish peace in Iraq prompted a fundamental change in our foreign policy: shifting the U.S. military’s focus to counterinsurgency and the rebuilding of failed states. In less than a decade, foreign assistance has become militarized, and humanitarianism has been armed. Armed Humanitarians: The Rise of the Nation Builders follows this experiment in armed social work from Afghanistan and Iraq to Africa and Haiti.

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