Streams

 

Integration

Selected Shorts

Short Stories about Convergences

Friday, August 01, 2014

Guest host David Sedaris presents a Flannery O’Connor classic, and a bittersweet road story by Amy Hempel.

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Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: Convergence

Sunday, May 26, 2013

Guest host David Sedaris presents one of his all-time favorite stories, Flannery O'Connor's "Everything that Rises Must Converge," fiercely read by Estelle Parsons.

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The Takeaway

Cyprus Rejects E.U. Bailout Deal

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Lawmakers in Cyprus turned down a €10 billion package from the European Union yesterday, calling it not a bailout but blackmail. It would have taxed ordinary bank deposits and left bondholders alone, a widely-criticized move that all but ensured its defeat.

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American RadioWorks

State Of Siege: Mississippi Whites and the Civil Rights Movement

Sunday, February 24, 2013

No state in the South was more resistant to the struggle for black equality and none more violent than Mississippi. Drawing on newly discovered archival audio and groundbreaking research on the civil rights era, State of Siege brings to light the extraordinary tactics whites in Mississippi used to battle integration and the lasting impact of that battle in American politics today. Produced by American RadioWorks

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Housing Integration

Thursday, December 06, 2012

ProPublica reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones; Fred Freiberg, Executive Director of the Fair Housing Justice Center; and Betsy Julian, former Housing and Urban Development executive, discuss why the 1968 Fair Housing Act, which was supposed to help integrate cities, has gone largely unenforced, and what HUD should do to integrate cities. Nikole Hannah-Jones has been reporting on the topic for ProPublica, and you can read her articles here, and she's the author of a Kindle single called Living Apart: How the Government Betrayed a Landmark Civil Rights Law.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

James L. Farmer Jr. Advocates Revolutionary Freedoms for African-Americans

Friday, September 21, 2012

"America is being forced to face itself," James Farmer proclaims in this 1963 Overseas Press Club appearance, before discussing the upcoming march on Washington and the historical roots of the civil rights struggle.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Strange Story of Integration in America

Monday, September 03, 2012

Tanner Colby points out that while racial equality is the law of the land, actual integration is still hard to find, and that in most of the country, black people and white people don’t spend much time together—at work, school, church, or anywhere. Colby set out to discover why, and in Some of My Best Friends Are Black: The Strange Story of Integration in America he chronicles America’s relationship with race and integration.

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The Takeaway

Diverse Neighborhood, Uniform Friends

Thursday, July 12, 2012

Tanner Colby is what you might call a typical, liberal, city-dwelling, 30-something white guy. But one day he looked around and realized something: Despite living in Brooklyn, one of the most diverse cities in the world, he had no black friends.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Strange Story of Integration in America

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Tanner Colby points out that while racial equality is the law of the land, actual integration is still hard to find, and that in most of the country, black people and white people don’t spend much time together—at work, school, church, or anywhere. Colby set out to discover why, and in Some of My Best Friends Are Black: The Strange Story of Integration in America he chronicles America’s relationship with race and integration.

Comments [12]

The Takeaway

Ojibwe Language Thrives in Minnesota

Thursday, February 23, 2012

A small town in Minnesota is trying to make a big change. The people of Bemidji, Minnesota are building bridges between the white and the Native communities by making the signs in public buildings and many businesses both in Ojibwe and English

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On The Media

Hellhounds On My Trail

Friday, December 30, 2011

If all commenters are ticking time bombs waiting to go off, then rule one is - don’t light the fuse by responding directly. But as a professional writer and critic, Lee Siegel had had enough. So he used a pseudonym to respond. In an interview from 2008, Siegel explains the hard-won lessons from his trip to the trenches.

Anika - Officer Officer

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The Takeaway

Race, Academics and 'Acting White'

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

It has been 56 years since the Supreme Court struck down segregation in Brown vs. Board of Education. A new book, “Acting White: The Ironic Legacy of Desegregation,” puts forward the notion that desegregation's positive changes have come along with some unintended side effects. Stuart Buck, the book's author, argues that the criticism successful black students often receive from their peers – that they are “acting white” – is largely a consequence of how our schools were desegregated.

 

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The Takeaway

The Takeaway Hour 4: What Teachers Want, Poverty Index, Mayor of 'Google, Kan.,' Mugabe

Thursday, March 04, 2010

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The Takeaway

[Web Special] NAACP Women Made History in Tennessee

Friday, July 17, 2009

To commemorate the NAACP's Centennial, we take you to Franklin County, a rural area of 40,000 people in the southern part of Middle Tennessee. In 1958, two black women — Mrs. Johnnie Fowler, and Mickey Marlow — and one white man — Scott Bates — formed the area's first branch of the NAACP, the "Franklin County Branch." It's one of the few branches nationwide where female activists, and not men, led the town's desegregation efforts. One woman is still alive to tell the story of their struggle: Ms. Sarah Staten.

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Patricia Marx

Martin Garbus

Thursday, June 13, 1968

A report on the slow progress of integration in The South.

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