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Insects

The Brian Lehrer Show

Eat Some Worms

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

New Yorker staff writer Dana Goodyear discusses her article in this week's magazine about entomphagy (eating insects) and the gourmet virtues of insects as a food source.

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Features

Learn to Live Like a Wasp at the Natural History Museum

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

This week, insect lovers can learn to live like wasps at the American Museum of Natural History. A nearly 15-foot tall replica of a yellow jacket nest is being constructed of cardboard, wood and aluminum on the museum's Arthur Ross Terrace. It will be completed by Friday.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

From Ants to Invasive Potato Beetles: More About Bugs

Friday, May 06, 2011

Today’s Please Explain is a look at bugs with Amy Stewart, author of Wicked Bugs. If you want to learn more about some specific insects—and some of the diseases they carry—here are some of our other insect-related Please Explains we've done in the past:

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: Bad Bugs

Friday, May 06, 2011

You may have noticed the first gnats, flies, and ticks of the season. Today’s Please Explain is about bad bugs—the dangerous, destructive, and poisonous creatures that are feared and sometimes misunderstood. Amy Stewart, author of Wicked Bugs joins us.

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Transportation Nation

TN Moving Stories: US Traffic Fatalities Hit Lowest Point In 60 Years, Toronto Went From "Transit City" to "Transit Pity", and: Look Up! Invisible Bug Highway

Friday, April 01, 2011

U.S. traffic fatalities fell to the lowest levels in 60 years--representing a 25% decline since 2005 (New York Times). US DOT head Ray LaHood writes: "Despite this good news, we are not going to rest on our laurels."

A Los Angeles Times columnist says that the MTA, in eliminating bus lines, is making the wrong decision at the wrong time. Says he in the accompanying video (below): "We are cutting back at exactly the time we should be throwing a lot of resources into expanding public transportation."

The Toronto Star feels similarly about that city's transit plan. "Transit City has become a transit pity," they write of Mayor Rob Ford's commuter rail expansion, saying it "will take longer to build, deliver less service, and leave Toronto in search of an extra $4.2 billion."

Skanska AB, the construction giant working on some of New York's largest public works projects (including the Fulton Street Transit Center), will pay a $19.6 million settlement after being investigated for circumventing rules designed to encourage the hiring of minority- and women-owned businesses. (Wall Street Journal)

A decision about contested bike lanes in Boston's Charlestown neighborhood is expected in April. Last November, the city installed about a quarter-mile of a bike path on Charlestown's Main Street, then removed the lanes a short time later after neighborhood complaints. (Boston Globe)

U.S. sales of cars and trucks are expected to rise at a double-digit rate in March (AP via Detroit Free Press). Meanwhile, Toyota USA today announced higher sticker prices for nearly every 2011 model the company sells here. (USA Today)

A new report says that Texas will be facing a $170 billion gap between the amount of money that needs to be invested in transportation to keep commutes from getting worse and the amount of money the state expects to bring in from federal freeway funds, the gasoline tax and vehicle registration fees between 2011 and 2035. (Houston Chronicle)

President Obama signed a bill that funds the Federal Aviation Administration re-authorization bill through May. Meanwhile, a battle is brewing over some controversial pieces of the longer measure. (The Hill)

In Bethesda, Maryland, you can now use your cellphone to pay the parking meter. (WAMU)

Look up! Above your head is an invisible billion-bug highway. (NPR)

Top Transportation Nation stories we're following: Houston is contemplating natural gas-powered buses. NY Congressman -- and bike lane cipher -- Anthony Weiner kills at the Correspondents Dinner (sample line: "Vote for Weiner--he'll be frank.") We have the latest in the inter-city bus investigations. And: the K train rides again -- if only on the subway's roll sign.

Follow Transportation Nation on Twitter.

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Radiolab

Emergence

Tuesday, August 14, 2007

What happens when there is no leader? We look at the bottom-up logic of cities, Google, and even our brains.

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Radiolab

There is No Lord of the (Fire)Flies

Tuesday, August 14, 2007

We begin in Thailand, watching fireflies glow in glorious synchrony, lighting up miles of mangrove trees like Christmas trees. Next...it’s off to Stanford University to contemplate the bottomless mystery of ants, a mystery which culminates in New York City’s flower market (ever wondered what ants can teach us about human ...

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Studio 360

Charlotte's Web

Saturday, April 03, 2004

In children's literature, spiders have a history as heroes. Eric Carle's Very Busy Spider and David Kirk's Miss Spider's Tea Party are both modern classics of arachnophilia. The spider who won our hearts first, 52 years ago, is Charlotte, the heroine of E.B. White's Charlotte's Web. The novelist Susan Minot ...

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Studio 360

Metamorphosis

Saturday, April 03, 2004

One of the best known bugs in literature is Gregor Samsa. He's the protagonist of Franz Kafka's novella Metamorphosis. Gregor wakes up one morning to discover he's turned into a giant roach. Actor Danton Stone reads Kafka's opening passages. Produced by Leital Molad.

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Studio 360

Jennifer Angus

Saturday, April 03, 2004

Jennifer Angus makes art installations in which the walls look like fancy wallpaper. But when you get close, you see that the patterns are formed by dragon flies and beetles. She pins insects to walls by the thousand, arranging them in repeating patterns. Producer Sesh Kannan talked with Angus ...

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Studio 360

Miya Masaoka

Saturday, April 03, 2004

When Musician Miya Masaoka tours she often sits in her hotel room for hours, watching her musical collaborators interact. Her collaborators are Madagascar hissing cockroaches. She has another composition that she performs with a chorus of bees. Produced by Michael Raphael.

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Studio 360

Special Guest: Catherine Chalmers

Saturday, April 03, 2004

Kurt Andersen and artist Catherine Chalmers talk about how music, art, and literature explore the creative possibilities of bugs.

Catherine Chalmers is a photographer and artist who spends her time with bugs and other small creatures. She takes funny, and amazing portraits of caterpillars, flies, preying mantises, and grasshoppers. Lately ...

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