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Insects

WNYC News

Extraordinary Species Living On the Edge

Friday, April 10, 2015

An exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History offers a look at the world of animals and plants with superpowers.

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The Takeaway

Why Cockroaches Make Good Robots

Tuesday, September 09, 2014

Scientists have found an unusual partner to potentially help find people caught under rubble or monitor conditions in hard to reach places: The much-maligned cockroach.

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Last Chance Foods

Last Chance Foods: Eat a Cricket, Save the Planet

Friday, May 16, 2014

Chirp, chirp... chomp. Could crickets be the protein of the future? Six Foods founder Rose Wang explains why the little critters could secure our future on Earth. And they don't taste half bad, either.

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Radiolab

Plants Talk. Plants Listen. Here's How

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

They don't have eyes. Or ears. Or what we would call a nervous system. But plants can talk. And they listen. Let me show you how.

First, we'll need a plant eater. This one's perfect: It's an aphid, a hungry little critter who loves to munch on fresh, green leaves ...

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WNYC News

Egads. There's a New Cockroach in Town

Monday, December 09, 2013

AP

The High Line, a park that turned a dilapidated stretch of elevated railway on Manhattan's West Side into one of New York's newest tourist attractions, may have brought a different kind of visitor: A cockroach that can withstand harsh winter cold and never seen before in the U.S.

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WNYC News

Killers on the Loose! Cicada Killers, That Is

Thursday, September 05, 2013

If you've noticed some enormous wasps buzzing through New York City parks recently, you're not alone. The two-inch long black and yellow Eastern Cicada Killer wasp has been turning heads and quickening steps from Prospect Park to Central Park, as the insect's late summer season draws to a close.

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Radiolab

Plotting a Pain Scale

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Pain is a fundamental part of life, and often a very lonely part. Doctors want to understand their patients' pain, and we all want to understand the suffering of our loved ones. But pinning down another person's hurt is a slippery business. Is your relentless lower back pain more or ...

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Radiolab

The Risks and Rewards of Empathy

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Sometimes being a good scientist requires putting aside your emotions. But what happens when objectivity isn't enough to make sense of a seemingly senseless act of violence? Lulu Miller introduces us to Jeff Lockwood, a professor at the University of Wyoming, who spent a part of his career studying a ...

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Radiolab

Known Unknowns

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Stories of trying to chart the unknown, by measuring and making sense of things just beyond our grasp.

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Radiolab

Let's Spoon for Forty Years

Sunday, July 21, 2013

You've got them... under your skin... Well, hopefully not. But if you did get infected with blood flukes, would it make you feel better to know they're monogamous creatures, pairing up and sticking together for years, sometimes even decades? Warms the heart.

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Radiolab

I Like Ant Butts And I Cannot Lie

Saturday, July 20, 2013

We pay tribute to the ingenious (and stomach-churning) ways that parasites hook up with hosts in our Parasites episode. Case in point: the parasitic nematode, which turns an ant's rear end into a ripe-looking red morsel that, to a hungry bird, looks like a juicy berry.

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Radiolab

Seeking Cockroaches, Any Age

Friday, July 19, 2013

Are those butterflies in your stomach... or did something else worm its way into your system? In honor of our Parasites episode, we imagine how some of our favorite (most disgustingly fascinating?) parasites might look for love (and a stable host) online. Up first...the Paaarasitic Wasp!

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Radiolab

Cicadas, Not Just for the Outdoors

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Tempted to collect some cicada specimens this spring? An entomologist at the American Museum of Natural History explains how you can prepare, pin, and display the bugs at home.

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Radiolab

Free Download: Bug Music

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

David Rothenberg hears symphonies where most of us hear squeaks and squawks. In our new podcast The Septendecennial Sing-Along, he describes tuning his ears to hear, and play along with, the music of animals and insects. Here's a free download from his CD Bug Music.

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Radiolab

Do Bugs Make Your Mouth Water?

Thursday, April 18, 2013

Sizzling Chili Cicadas? How About Some Cicada-Rhubarb Pie? Bugs will be bursting from the ground in patches along the East Coast this spring when the 17-year Brood II cicadas emerge. Will you sink your teeth in?

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Radiolab

The Bugs of History

Friday, April 05, 2013

Periodical cicadas emerge in cycles of 17 and 13 years, making them a kind of cultural bug clock -- a buzzing reminder of invasions of yore, and a good excuse to think back on where we were the last time they burst from the ground in massive, memorable hordes.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Cicadas Are Coming!

Monday, April 01, 2013

The last time Cicadas appeared in NYC, the Brian Lehrer Show was called "On the Line," there was no such thing as an "embedabble map," and WNYC's Data News team didn't exist. Luckily that's all changed. John Keefe of WNYC Data News discusses their latest project: Cicada Tracker. WNYC is asking citizen scientists around the region to build a detector that reports back soil temperatures. When we begin to see consistent readings of 64° we'll know the cicadas or on their way!

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Radiolab

REBROADCAST: Emergence

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

This spring, parts of the East Coast will turn squishy and crunchy -- the return of the 17-year cicadas means surfaces in certain locations (in patches from VA to CT) will once again be coated in bugs buzzing at 7 kilohertz. In their honor, we're rebroadcasting one of our favorite episodes: Emergence.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Threat to Orange Juice

Monday, March 04, 2013

The U.S. orange industry is under siege from a disease killing citrus trees. Anna Kuchment, senior editor at Scientific American, talks about possible solutions and what it means for consumers.

 

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Radiolab

Inside "Ouch!"

Monday, August 27, 2012

Pain is a fundamental part of life, and often a very lonely part. Doctors want to understand their patients' pain, and we all want to understand the suffering of our friends, relatives, or spouses. But pinning down another person's hurt is a slippery business. 

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