Streams

 

Information

The Leonard Lopate Show

How to Master Information Overload Using Neuroscience

Monday, October 13, 2014

A psychologist and neuroscientist explains how new research into attention and memory can help us navigate information overload.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How to Multi-Task and Better Manage Your Time at Home and at Work

Monday, August 18, 2014

A psychologist and neuroscientist explains how new research into attention and memory can help us navigate information overload.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Invention of the News

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Long before the invention of printing, people wanted information. Andrew Pettegree tracks the history of news in ten countries over the course of four centuries—from gossip, civic ceremony, sermons, and proclamations to printed pamphlets, edicts, journals to the local and worldwide news as we know it today. In The Invention of the News: How the World Came to Know About Itself, Pettegree investigates who controlled the news and who reported it, news as a tool of political protest and religious reform, issues of privacy and titillation, reliability and trust.

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On The Media

Facebook is still not dying

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Another day, another hysterical report on the demise of Facebook.

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On The Media

Going Viral, Antebellum Style

Friday, November 22, 2013

The Infectious Texts project at Northeastern University is making thousands of pre-Civil War newspapers searchable. Bob talks with Ryan Cordell, a leader on the project, about the mechanism behind text virality in the 1800’s and some of what’s been discovered so far.

Black Keys - Psychotic Girl

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On The Media

India's Right to Information

Friday, October 04, 2013

India, infamous for its bureaucracy and corruption, has one of the strongest freedom of information laws in the world. OTM reporter Jamie York went to India to talk to Subhash Agrawal, Nikhil Dey, Aruna Roy, Shailesh Gandhi and Sowmya Kidambi (and to hear Shankar Singh sing) about the struggle to achieve the law and the power and pitfalls of such a transformative tool.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

How do Spammers Target Your Inbox? Hint: it's Scary

Monday, July 15, 2013

Finn Brunton, assistant professor of Media, Culture and Communication at NYU Steinhardt and the author of Spam: A Shadow History of the Internet (MIT Press, 2013) talks about the history of much-despised spam and how it mirrors that of the internet.

How do S

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The Takeaway

100,000 Volunteer Proofreaders and a Whole Lot of Books

Thursday, April 18, 2013

The world record for proofreading, if there ever was one, was surely broken this month by the 100,000 volunteers who've helped out Project Gutenberg, the world’s oldest electronic library, with their close reading and tireless dedication.

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Radiolab

REBROADCAST: Emergence

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

This spring, parts of the East Coast will turn squishy and crunchy -- the return of the 17-year cicadas means surfaces in certain locations (in patches from VA to CT) will once again be coated in bugs buzzing at 7 kilohertz. In their honor, we're rebroadcasting one of our favorite episodes: Emergence.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Information Overload

Thursday, February 09, 2012

Clay Johnson, founder of Blue State Digital, former director of Sunlight Labs at the Sunlight Foundation, and the author of The Information Diet: A Case for Conscious Consumption, talks about how to weed out the junk data and stick to a healthy diet of information.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Google: Do No Evil?

Thursday, May 12, 2011

Google expert Scott Cleland argues that the world's most powerful company has a hidden political agenda, and explains why he things its mission to organize the world's information is destructive and wrong. In Search & Destroy: Why You Can’t Trust Google Inc., he explains that Google has the largely unchecked power to influence and control virtually everything the Internet touches.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

James Gleick on The Information

Friday, May 06, 2011

James Gleick discusses how information has become the modern era’s defining quality and the vital principle of our world. The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood looks at how we got to the current information age and where we are heading. It tells the story of information, explains how information technologies have changed the nature of human consciousness, and he writes of the key figures in the development of our modern understanding of information.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Knowing What They Know

Tuesday, April 05, 2011

Today’s Wall Street Journal reports that federal prosecutors in New Jersey are now investigating whether some smartphone applications are illegally grabbing or transmit your personal information without the proper disclosure. It’s an issue that came up during Leonard’s discussions with WSJ editor Julia Angwin in August 2010 and last month.

The online music service Pandora is one of the companies that has received a subpoena, but the WSJ tested 101 apps and found that 56 of them were transmitting information about the device without the user’s consent.

Do you think that you’ll change the way you use your smartphone? Will you cut back on the apps you use on your iPhone or Droid? Should information gathering be a criminal offense? Let us know what you think in the comments section below

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The Takeaway

James Gleick's Information Overload

Thursday, March 10, 2011

We commonly describe the time we live in as “the information age.” More dramatically, some, like Eric Schmidt of Google, say we’re in the midst of an “information explosion.” But what, exactly, is information? Is it an idea? The documentation of an idea? James Gleick explores these questions in his new book “The Information: A History, A Theory, A Flood.” He joins us from Tampa, Florida.

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The Takeaway

Using Information to Beat Gadhafi

Wednesday, March 02, 2011

The United States is considering a range of options to deal with Libya, including military action and sanctions. However, there's another possibility for Libya: an information campaign and the Pentagon has reportedly explored at the option of jamming Libya's communications so that Gadhafi has a harder time talking to his forces. Matt Armstrong, lecturer on public diplomacy at the USC Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism and publisher of  the blog MountainRunner.us, takes a closer look at how an information campaign might work in Libya.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

21st Century Power

Wednesday, February 09, 2011

Joseph Nye, University Distinguished Service Professor and former dean of Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and the author of The Future of Powerexplains why he believes that technology and information flows shape today's balance of global power.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Master Switch

Friday, November 12, 2010

Tim Wu discusses the history of the information industry in America, and looks at whether the Internet will be taken over and privatized as radio and television has before it. In The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information, he tells stories of the power over information, and wonders if the Internet—and the entire flow of American information—will come to be ruled by one corporate leviathan.

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The Takeaway

Tim Wu on the Rise and Fall of Information Empires

Tuesday, November 09, 2010

It's a debate that's been around for as long as the Internet has been around: How do we keep the information superhighway open and beneficial for the public in a world that seems increasingly driven by corporations? The question has inspired plenty of debate about modern treatment of older principals, but author Tim Wu insists this debate isn’t new. He says it’s been around as long as communication structures have existed — from the telephone and radio to television.

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The Takeaway

'Information Ubiquity' Connects Swine Flu and the Kindle

Monday, May 11, 2009

Experts said our interconnected world was going to make outbreaks like H1N1 far worse than those that came before. But author Steven Johnson says that information spreads faster than people do, and that's what will keep us safe. This is thanks to what he calls "information ubiquity," which is the same force behind the decline of newspapers and the rise of e-readers like the Kindle. Johnson is the author of a recent book about the 1854 cholera epidemic in London called The Ghost Map as well as Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Software, and his most recent book is The Invention of Air. He is also the founder of hyper-local reporting site Outside.In.

For more, read Steven Johnson's article in the Wall Street Journal, How the E-Book Will Change the Way We Read and Write.
"We don't have national headlines about car accidents, but we about child abductions, ironically, because they're unusual and because they're so dramatic. So we're drawn to those things because they're unusual and dramatic, but the instill in us a wrong sense of where the actual threats are."
—Author Steven Johnson on the spread of information

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