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Indian

The Leonard Lopate Show

Kiran Ahluwalia, Infusing Modern Music With Sufi Mysticism, Performs Live

Friday, February 20, 2015

Vocalist-composer Kiran Ahluwalia and her band perform live from her new album, Sanata: Stillness. She brings modern sensibility to songs of Sufi mysticism and yearning romantic love. 

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FT Big Read

Aceh ten years after the Indian Ocean tsunami

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Aceh ten years after the Indian Ocean tsunami

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Soundcheck

Gig Alert: Kavita Shah

Tuesday, September 02, 2014

Indian and African sounds meet jazz standards tonight... at Jazz Standard. Download 'Visions.'

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Storycorps

StoryCorps 377: My Father, The Giant

Monday, June 09, 2014

Thompson Williams talks about his father's legacy with his son, Kiamichi-tet Williams.

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99% Invisible

113- Monumental Dilemma

Tuesday, May 06, 2014

About ten miles north of Concord, New Hampshire, off of interstate 93 there’s a little island with a great, big monument on it. The monument depicts a woman, who is holding a hatchet in her right hand and bunch of scalps in her left hand.

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Soundcheck

Gig Alert: Tongues In Trees

Monday, April 14, 2014

Indie dream pop meets Indian bhangra, tonight at Nublu. Download "Meri Bhavana."

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Micropolis

One Indian Man Eats and Tells

Monday, April 07, 2014

As a South Asian growing up in Texas, Arun Venugopal never thought twice about eating with his hands while at home but in public in front of his friends and strangers alike, it was a different story. Arun hits Wall Street to see if this taboo of his childhood is still relevant in NYC today.

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WNYC News

Miss America's Haters Meet Their Match

Monday, September 16, 2013

New Yorker Nina Davuluri won the pageant, becoming the first person of Indian descent to claim the title. But it was the racist backlash to her win that made this episode significant — online remarks like "Miss America? You mean, Miss 7-11?" or ones that called her "Miss Al-Qaeda."

The Takeaway

Movie Date: 'The Lone Ranger,' 'Despicable Me 2,' 'Kevin Hart: Let Me Explain'

Thursday, July 04, 2013

When's the last time Johnny Depp played an average, regular guy? What exactly are those yellow egg-shaped things in the "Despicable Me" movies? And does Kevin Hart really need to explain anything? These and other questions are explored in the newest Movie Date podcast, as Rafer and Kristen review "The Lone Ranger," "Despicable Me 2," and "Kevin Hart: Let Me Explain." To help them with "The Lone Ranger," and specifically with the depiction of Tonto, they're joined by Rick Chavolla, Education and Development Officer at the American Indian Community House in New York.

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Soundcheck

Ravi Shankar: A Sitar Star Remembered

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Ravi Shankar, legendary sitar master who played alongside The Beatles, John Coltrane and Yehudi Menuhin, died Tuesday at the age of 92. Soundcheck host John Schaefer reflects on the life and music of Shankar. 

Listen back to two archival interviews conducted by Schaefer on his program New Sounds -- one from 1984, the other from 1996.

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The first time I met Ravi Shankar, he told the story of the first time he met Baba Allaudin Khan, the man who would become his guru, and later, his father-in-law. Khan began, Shankar recalled, "by rebuking me. He said I was like a butterfly, doing too many things." Shankar was a 15-year old dancer in his brother Uday Shankar's troupe, which in the 1930s first brought Indian music and dance to the West. He also sang, played flute, and sitar -- all by ear. Khan told him that when he was ready to settle down and commit to one thing, he would accept Shankar as a student. It was, he said, a difficult decision, and it took a couple of years, but he eventually committed to the sitar.

Fortunately for us, Ravi Shankar never stopped doing "too many things." While he did become the most famous sitarist and perhaps the most globally-renowned non-Western artist of our time, he also composed film scores, collaborated with leading classical, rock, jazz and traditional Japanese musicians, and even wrote electronic music and played a bit of synthesizer.

"When I play the sitar," Shankar said during one of his many visits to our studio, "I am a purist, orthodox, very traditional. But as a composer I'm not frightened of experimenting with new sounds. It excites me to hear a whole range of instruments."

This was a hard-won wisdom. In the wake of becoming The Beatles "cult guru," to use his phrase, Shankar found himself in a range of unusual settings. Booked into huge rock festivals, he admitted to being discomfited by the sheer volume of the music and the rampant drug use that accompanied much of it. Though he did say he liked The Mamas & The Papas and some of the other, more melodic groups, I got the strong impression that he would not have willingly sat through another Jimi Hendrix set. After Woodstock, when he saw half a million young people "in the mud, and no one in their right mind," Shankar insisted to his overeager managers that he would not do any more rock festivals.

So for much of the 1970s, Shankar kept a relatively low profile, and when he returned in the '80s, he found that the wave of raga-rock excess has crested, and left behind in its wake a much smaller, but still substantial, number of listeners who were genuinely interested in and moved by his music. When he marked his 50th anniversary of performing, he seemed as energized as ever. Every night, he said, meant a different audience, and that kept it new for him.

Shankar passed on his musical genes. His son Shubho passed away in 1992 at the age of 50, but had toured with Ravi and had proven himself a worthy musical companion. His daughters, Anoushka Shankar and singer Norah Jones have each come into their own in the last decade -- Norah of course with a boatload of Grammy Awards and Anoushka as a globetrotting, risk-taking sitarist very much cut from her father's cloth.

And finally, Ravi Shankar taught. You can take that any way you want: He literally taught music to students in school and in private. But he also taught several generations of Westerners to appreciate the beauty and tradition of Indian music. On an even more basic level, he taught us that just because music doesn't come from your culture doesn't mean it can't be yours.

The first time I met Ravi Shankar, he told the story of the first time he
met Baba Allaudin Khan, the man who would become his guru (and later, his
father-in-law). Khan began, he recalled, “by rebuking me. He said I was
like a butterfly, doing too many things.” Ravi was a 15-year old dancer in
his brother Uday Shankar’s troupe, which in the 1930s first brought Indian
music and dance to the West. He also sang, played flute, and sitar – by ear.
Khan told him that when he was ready to settle down and commit to one thing,
he would accept him as a student. It was, Ravi said, a difficult decision,
and it took a couple of years, but he eventually committed to the sitar.The first time I met Ravi Shankar, he told the story of the first time he
met Baba Allaudin Khan, the man who would become his guru (and later, his
father-in-law). Khan began, he recalled, “by rebuking me. He said I was
like a butterfly, doing too many things.” Ravi was a 15-year old dancer in
his brother Uday Shankar’s troupe, which in the 1930s first brought Indian
music and dance to the West. He also sang, played flute, and sitar – by ear.
Khan told him that when he was ready to settle down and commit to one thing,
he would accept him as a student. It was, Ravi said, a difficult decision,
and it took a couple of years, but he eventually committed to the sitar.

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Soundcheck

Putting The 'Indie' In Indian Cuisine

Wednesday, November 07, 2012

A new short film, Dosa Hunt from Stereogum executive editor Amrit Singh documents a quest by six indie musicians as they seek out the best dosa in New York City.

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Spinning on Air

Heading East

Sunday, August 19, 2012

David Garland presents recordings new and old by musicians exploring the paths that unite East and West, including a new collaboration between Jesse Sparhawk and Eric Carbonara, a classic recording by Bill Evans and Herbie Mann, and music by Nils Frahm, The Stone Poneys, Clem Alford, and Ravi Shankar.

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On Being

Ernie LaPointe and Cedric Good House — Reimagining Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotake [remix]

Thursday, April 19, 2012

As some Lakota make an annual pilgrimage on horseback to Wounded Knee in memory of Sitting Bull's death, we'll pull out some of the lesser known threads of the legacy of this complex leader and American icon. And we'll explore why his spiritual character

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On Being

[Unedited] Ernie LaPointe with Krista Tippett

Thursday, April 19, 2012

As some Lakota make an annual pilgrimage on horseback to Wounded Knee in memory of Sitting Bull's death, we'll pull out some of the lesser known threads of the legacy of this complex leader and American icon. And we'll explore why his spiritual character

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On Being

[Unedited] Cedric Good House with Krista Tippett

Thursday, April 19, 2012

As some Lakota make an annual pilgrimage on horseback to Wounded Knee in memory of Sitting Bull's death, we'll pull out some of the lesser known threads of the legacy of this complex leader and American icon. And we'll explore why his spiritual character

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On Being

[Unedited] Carole Barrett with Krista Tippett

Thursday, April 19, 2012

As some Lakota make an annual pilgrimage on horseback to Wounded Knee in memory of Sitting Bull's death, we'll pull out some of the lesser known threads of the legacy of this complex leader and American icon. And we'll explore why his spiritual character

Comment

Spinning on Air

Heading East

Sunday, November 20, 2011

David Garland presents recordings new and old by musicians exploring the paths that unite East and West, including a new collaboration between Jesse Sparhawk and Eric Carbonara, a classic recording by Bill Evans and Herbie Mann, and music by Nils Frahm, The Stone Poneys, Clem Alford, and Ravi Shankar.

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Features

A Journey to Chindia at the Asia Society

Wednesday, November 02, 2011

To explore the sometimes problematic confluence of the two countries, The Asia Society will launch its new Asian Arts & Ideas series with a forum called “The ‘Chindia’ Dialogues” on Thursday. The talks run through Sunday.

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The Takeaway

Geraldine Brooks on 'Caleb's Crossing'

Monday, May 16, 2011

In 1665, a young man from Martha's Vineyard became the first Native American to graduate from Harvard College. His name was Caleb, and a new novel imagines what his life was like, and who the people were that helped shape him. The new book is called “Caleb’s Crossing.” Pulitzer Prize winning novelist and journalist Geraldine Brooks is the author. She joins us in studio.

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The Takeaway

The Life and Death of Crazy Horse

Tuesday, December 07, 2010

The mythology of Native American warriors permeates a vast swath of American history and culture: from the stories we see played out on the big screen to the questionable names of some of our professional sports teams. And among the American Indian warriors, the name that is perhaps best known is that of Crazy Horse, the Sioux warrior famous for his involvement in Custer’s last stand.

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