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Independent Budget Office

Schoolbook

Report: Special Needs Students Stay Longer at New York City Charter Schools

Thursday, January 29, 2015

WNYC
In a reversal, the Independent Budget Office said students with special needs are less likely to leave charters than their peers at city district schools.
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WNYC News

99 Budget Options and a Deficit Ain't One

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Legalizing and taxing pot could bring in $25 million for New York City. 

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Schoolbook

IBO: More Special Need Students Leave Charters Than District Schools

Thursday, January 09, 2014

Students who enroll in charter schools for kindergarten are more likely to stay through third grade than students at traditional New York City public schools, according to the Independent Budget Office, with one exception: special education pupils.

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WNYC News

How Can NYC Save Money? Here's 90 Ways

Wednesday, December 04, 2013

WNYC

New York City's Independent Budget Office has come up with 90-plus ways the city can increase revenue and cut costs. The options range from taxing disposable plastic bags, to plastic surgery, to restoring the commuter tax that was cut in 1999.

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WNYC News

This is How Much Prisoners Cost the City Each Year

Friday, August 23, 2013

The average annual cost to house an inmate in New York City is more than $167,731,according to a report issued by the Independent Budget Office.

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Schoolbook

Budget Group Releases Extensive Schools Data

Thursday, May 30, 2013

The IBO analysts have made sense of reams of numbers and graphs in their second survey of New York City schools data. One factoid: 83 percent of public school students in 2011-2012 were born in the United States while the remaining 17 percent hail from 197 other countries or territories. Another one: average class sizes increased in kindergarten through eighth grades by varying degrees. In first and second grade, it was about one student per class while seventh and eighth grades increased on average by 0.1 students per class.

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WNYC News

Major Threat Looms for City's Fiscal Health: IBO

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

WNYC

The city’s independent budget analysts warned on Wednesday that the fiscal health of the city faces a serious threat: all the city's municipal labor unions are working with expired contracts.

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Schoolbook

IBO: Phase-Out Schools Enroll More Struggling Students

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

A new report finds higher concentrations of students in poverty and special needs at the 26 schools the city has targeted for closure, but it doesn't draw any conclusions about whether the schools received enough funds to prevent them from going downhill academically.

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WNYC News

Albany Under Pressure to Renew Condo & Co-Op Tax Break

Monday, January 14, 2013

The legislature in Albany is back in session, and among the top items on the agenda: whether or how to renew the tax abatement on 364,000 co-ops and condominiums in New York City.

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WNYC News

NYC Could End Fiscal Year with Small Surplus

Thursday, December 27, 2012

After years of shrinking tax revenues and yawning budget gaps, New York City's finances have improved significantly, according to a report from the city's Independent Budget Office.

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WNYC News

Tax Reform Options Spread Pain Differently for New Yorkers

Friday, December 21, 2012

As a compromise remains out of reach for President Obama and John Boehner on how to revamp spending and tax policies in 2013, a new analysis looks at five different scenarios for tax reform and how each would affect the annual bills paid by New Yorkers.

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WNYC News

Changing Food Truck Permitting Process Could Raise Millions

Friday, June 08, 2012

If New York City used a bidding system to issue food truck permits — much like it does for taxi medallions or park concessions — the city could add $37 million to its coffers.

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WNYC News

IBO Puts out Alternatives for City to Save and Generate Revenue

Friday, April 27, 2012

The city's Independent Budget Office issued a report Friday that included a list of 72 ways the city can save and generate revenue. On the list are old favorites that are often discussed but never implemented, but there were also some newer, controversial cuts recommended.

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Schoolbook

Independent Report Gives Mixed Scores to City Schools' Letter Grades

Thursday, April 12, 2012

A report released on Thursday by the New York City Independent Budget Office said that while the A to F letter grades that are assigned to public schools annually are an improvement over other, less complex ways of measuring performance, they tend to punish schools with higher concentrations of poor, black and Hispanic students.

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Schoolbook

School Budget Picture Evolving

Friday, March 30, 2012

With conflicting budget figures rolling around, the city continues to insist: not to worry. Chancellor Dennis M. Walcott said Tuesday at a City Council hearing on the preliminary budget that he intended to protect schools from cuts and planned to keep the schools' budgets stable. If that is so, it means principals -- who control their own budgets in New York City -- can avoid more of the painful cuts of this school year and maintain a similar level of service and staffing.

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Schoolbook

Budget Analysis: Charter Spending Squeezing Education Budget

Thursday, March 29, 2012

New York City's Education Department will spend $51 million to open 26 new charter schools next year, according to a report released on Thursday by the Independent Budget Office. The analysis of Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg's preliminary budget also found that the city had slightly overestimated how much the Department of Education's budget would increase next year, while minimizing the amount by which general education spending may have to be cut to cover rising costs in other areas.

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The Empire

NYC living wage battle well-worn subject matter

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

It turns out the current battle over a living wage bill that would raise the pay of workers in a select number of city-sponsored work environments is old hat. According to Doug Turetsky of the city's Independent Budget Office, New York already has living wage legislation on the books that, thanks to Mayor Michael Bloomberg, goes far beyond what's currently being proposed:

Amid the uproar during the past few weeks over the proposed living wage law there’s one important point that you might have missed: the city already has a living-wage law. Its rules cover thousands of workers employed under more than $1 billion worth of contracts with the city.

In fact, New York City had one of the first living-wage laws in the country, though the city’s first bill covered just a couple thousand workers. Passed in 1996, over the veto of then-Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, the legislation was championed by advocacy organizations such as the Industrial Areas Foundation as well as local unions. It required that private firms contracting with the city to provide food services, security guards, cleaners, and temporary office workers pay their employees a living wage that ranged at the time from about $7.25 to $12 an hour.

The number and type of workers covered by the city’s living-wage rules expanded in 2002 when Mayor Michael Bloomberg signed a law that extended living-wage provisions to home health care and child care workers whose agencies had contracts with the city. The Brennan Centerat New York University estimated that under the new requirements the pay of 50,000 home health care workers would rise immediately and later the pay of up to 9,000 child care workers. Shortly after the law went into effect, Steve Malanga wrote ruefully in City Journal, “Thanks to Mayor Bloomberg, New York will now have the largest number of workers covered by any living-wage law in the nation.”

Read the rest of the blog entry here.

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Schoolbook

New York City Schools, In Almanac Form

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Do you want to know how attendance relates to student test performance? How many students in the New York City schools were born in Guyana compared to those born in India? Or maybe you want to know how much the system spent on pensions. It's all here, in the Independent Budget Office's annual report.

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WNYC News

IBO Paints a Slightly Rosier Picture for City Budget

Tuesday, May 24, 2011

WNYC

The nonpartisan Independent Budget Office is predicting slightly better news for the city than Mayor Michael Bloomberg laid out in his revised spending plan earlier this month.

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WNYC News

Quinn: City Revenues Falling

Wednesday, April 01, 2009

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With the city's economic outlook getting worse, City Council Speaker Christine Quinn says the city needs an even tighter budget than the one Mayor Bloomberg proposed in January. Quinn predicts that the city revenues will be $438 million less ...

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