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Inclusion

Schoolbook

Special Education Reform Brings City More In Line With National Trend

Thursday, August 09, 2012

New York City is revamping how it teaches many of its special-needs students, who have learning disabilities or moderate behavioral problems. Although the national trend has been to mix more of these students into mainstream classrooms, the city has stuck to an old model of keeping special ed students separate. Until now.

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Schoolbook

City Sees Special Ed Reforms as Costly but Necessary

Monday, July 30, 2012

Speaking on WNYC, the city's chief academic officer, Shael Polakow-Suransky, said the city was opening its hot line this week for parents of special education students ahead of this fall's overhaul of special education programs. Listen to the conversation, and share your comments.

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Schoolbook

Albany Bill Would Consider Home Life in Special Ed Placement

Tuesday, July 03, 2012

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo is weighing whether to sign a bill on special education that opponents argue would give families more power to send their children to religious schools at taxpayers’ expense.

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Schoolbook

Special Education Overhaul Brings New Concerns About Students' Programs

Monday, July 02, 2012

In September, most students with disabilities will be able to attend their neighborhood school. This means schools will have to follow the student's individualized education program, or I.E.P. It’s a legally binding document that spells out the needs of the student and it's not always easy to get the plan right.

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Schoolbook

Questions on Special Ed? There's a Hot Line for That

Friday, June 29, 2012

One of the many big changes coming to the city schools next year is the revamping of the special education program, which calls for more inclusion classrooms, with special education classes reserved for only the most severely disabled students. Now comes word that the city is creating a hot line so that parents can easily reach education officials if they have questions or problems with their child's placement or services that can't be addressed by the school.

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Schoolbook

City Official on Special Ed Plan: 'This Is Going Forward'

Thursday, June 14, 2012

City officials said its new citywide special education plan, which is supposed to take effect in the fall, is moving forward. Staff training is ongoing. Better communication is on the way. And, says Corinne Rello-Anselmi, the city’s incoming deputy chancellor for special education, there will be no delays: "This reform will no longer be a reform. It will be the way we do school.”

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Schoolbook

Horace Mann Case Prompts New Look at State Sex Abuse Laws

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

In the news this Wednesday, questions about the state's laws on sexual abuse in light of the allegations surrounding Horace Mann, and stalled progress in Albany to move against public schoolteachers who abuse students. Also, does the city know enough before implementing new special education policies citywide? What about parents? And a thief takes students' cellphones.

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Schoolbook

City Urged to Slow Down on Special Ed Plans

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

A citywide special education plan that aims to put New York City more in step with other school districts around the country by including those students in general education classrooms is causing commotion here, with a growing chorus of parents, teachers and elected officials insisting it is being too hastily implemented with too little information.

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Schoolbook

City Panel Approves Special Education Inclusion Plan

Thursday, May 24, 2012

A plan to restructure the city’s special education program by funneling thousands of learning-disabled children into mainstream classrooms — an increasingly popular practice around the country — was given the go-ahead Wednesday night when the Panel for Education Policy voted to finance it. Following some criticisms to the plan, Chancellor Dennis M. Walcott said after the vote, “We’re pure, at least with regards to the goals we are trying to achieve.”

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Schoolbook

Why Should a Disability Limit High School Choices?

Friday, April 20, 2012

Bryan Stromer is an eleventh grader at NYC Lab High School, a place where he is happy and thriving. But he wound up at Lab by default, after another school that interested him could not provide the special education services he needs. Now on the Citywide Council on Special Education, he writes about his hope that the city's upcoming changes in special education will make more schools accessible, giving students more options when choosing a high school.

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Schoolbook

Do High-Needs Students Affect a School's Grade?

Monday, February 13, 2012

New York City's latest plan to reform special education services encourages public school principals to take more of the neediest students. An analysis by WNYC shows how these students are not distributed evenly across all schools. The analysis also found that high schools with the best report card grades often take smaller percentages of the special education students who are the toughest to educate.

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Schoolbook

Voices: A Thoughtful Debate Over Inclusion

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

The issue of inclusion for special education students drew many commenters to SchoolBook, expressing a range of opinions. Most commenters took the approach that inclusion is not right for every child, and some argued that it is harmful. But others depicted inclusion as the civil rights struggle of the era. Here is a sample of the comments.

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Schoolbook

Inclusion: The Right Thing for All Students

Friday, November 11, 2011

In an open letter to the New York City schools' chief academic officer, Shael Polakow-Suransky, a disabilities expert argues that integrating special education students into the general classroom is a proven method that improves the education both of children with disabilities and those without.

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Schoolbook

Growing Long Island Cheating Scandal Now Includes ACT

Thursday, November 10, 2011

That cheating scandal on Long Island is now believed to involve as many as 35 students in five high schools, the Nassau County district attorney's office reports. And the cheating accusations do not surround only the SAT, but also the increasingly popular ACT exam.

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Schoolbook

For Some Special Ed Students, Inclusion Is Deferred

Thursday, November 10, 2011

More than 85 percent of New York City’s special education students are not meeting state standards for reading in the elementary and middle grades. Yet the city spends about $5 billion a year to educate students with special needs, more than a fifth of the total budget for schools. The city has been heavily criticized for spending so much money and getting such poor results. It is now trying to improve the way these students are educated. But going forward sometimes means taking a step back.

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WNYC News

Inclusion Deferred For Some Special Ed Students

Wednesday, November 09, 2011

More than one third of the city’s 165,000 special ed students are in separate classes for most of the school day. That is a bigger percentage than in Chicago and Los Angeles, according to those who have studied the city.

Some academics think anything less than full inclusion adversely affects special ed students for many years, and leads to poor graduation rates. Only 30 percent of New York City’s special education students graduate in four years, less than the national average.

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