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Inauguration

Transportation Nation

Your Guide to Biking to the Inauguration

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

(photo by Martin DiCaro)

No matter your mode of transportation to the second inauguration of President Barack Obama you will have to do a lot of walking, as D.C.'s police force will establish a large “hard perimeter” around the parade route closed to vehicular travel and bicycles. (A map of the restricted area is here.)

Before you begin to hoof it, however, the easiest way to get close to the National Mall may be on a bicycle.  Bicycling advocates expect thousands of people to pedal into downtown D.C. on Monday morning, and DDOT is taking steps to accommodate them.

For starters, there will be a large bicycle parking area established at 16th Street and I Street NW starting at 7 a.m.

“That’s going to hold about 700 bikes but you are going to want to bring your own lock.  It’s not valet parking but it will be supervised all day,” said DDOT planner Jim Sebastian.

As for Capital Bikeshare, there will be two special docking areas – corrals – that will accept an unlimited number of bikes: at Farragut Square in Northwest and at the USDA building at 12th Street and Independence Avenue Southwest.

“It’s essentially a bottomless station where you can come down and not have to worry about there being an empty space,” Sebastian said.

Starting today six bike share stations along the inaugural parade route will be temporarily dismantled. To make up for the closed stations, CaBi will open a temporary corral to accept bikes. You can see the list here.

For bicycling advocates, Monday presents an opportunity to show how much progress D.C. has made in becoming a bike-friendly city.

"This is going to be the first year that we have bike lanes on Pennsylvania Avenue during an inauguration, so President Obama is going to be riding down Pennsylvania Ave. and those bike lanes are going to be in all those photos,” said Greg Billing at the Washington Area Bicyclist Association. “This is a great time for us to show off to the nation that D.C. is a bike city and that we are setting an example that other cities around the country can follow.”

Remember the kerfuffle over bike share stations on the National Mall? Take a trip to March 2012 here.

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The Takeaway

Help Us Write a People's Poem for the Inauguration!

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

At The Takeaway, we think poetry was built for the digital age — and this inauguration could use a People’s Poem. So we invited noted poet Kwame Dawes to start us off with a first line — and we want you to be our co-authors! It’s a grand experiment — and here’s how you can make your voice heard.

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WQXR Blog

Poll: What Music Should Be Performed at Obama's Inauguration?

Wednesday, November 07, 2012

When Barack Obama took the oath of office in 2009, a group of four musicians played Air and Simple Gifts, a somber, elegiac piece by film composer John Williams. So who should perform in January?

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Transportation Nation

DC's Metro Prepares for Inauguration Day

Monday, October 15, 2012

(WMATA)

DC's transit agency is circulating proposed designs for a commemorative fare card that will be sold for the presidential inauguration.

(WMATA)

According to a WMATA spokeswoman, the agency will print 100,000 of these $15 cards, which would come pre-loaded with a one-day rail pass. (Functional and collectible!)

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The Takeaway

John F. Kennedy Inaugural Address Remembered

Thursday, January 20, 2011

Fifty years ago today, the 35th president of the United States John F. Kennedy uttered the following words at his inaugural address: 

"The energy, the faith, the devotion which we bring to this endeavor will light our country and all who serve it — and the glow from that fire can truly light the world. And so, my fellow Americans: Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country."

Why did JFK’s words strike a cord with so many? And how did his inauguration foreshadow what was ahead for the young president’s time in office?

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It's A Free Country ®

Keeping Score for Cuomo

Wednesday, January 05, 2011

Now that Governor Cuomo has taken office and given his first State of the State address, it's time to track what he does with his mandate. Here's a guide to the campaign promises Andrew Cuomo made as part of his "New NY Agenda." As he enacts these proposals, abandons them, or changes direction altogether, we'll be keeping score. For now, here's how the scorecard looks after the State of the State address.

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It's A Free Country ®

CT Governor Dan Malloy's Inaugural Address

Wednesday, January 05, 2011

The prepared text of Connecticut Governor Dan Malloy's inaugural remarks.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Real Malloy

Wednesday, January 05, 2011

Connecticut has a new governor. Dan Malloy will be sworn in as the state's 88th governor this afternoon and John Dankosky, news director at WNPR and host of Where We Live, joins us to review the inauguration plans and to discuss what's ahead for the new governor in 2011.

→ Read More And Join The Conversation At It's A Free Country

WNYC News

Today in History: JFK Delivers Inauguration Speech

Wednesday, January 20, 2010

(photo courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration)

(photo courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration)

Today in 1961 John F. Kennedy Jr. was inaugurated the 35th president. Below you can hear his full speech:

This also marks the one ...

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The Takeaway

Qualifying my "true belief" in President Barack Obama

Friday, January 23, 2009

The 20-year-old single "Don't Believe the Hype" by hip-hop icons Public Enemy has been a constant thought of mine in days up and through the inauguration of Barack Obama as the 44th president of the United States. The seminal political rap tune instructs black Americans, and others, to look beyond contrived media stereotypes to explore the complexities of black males and the negotiation of social and political spaces.

Having this lyrical tome — however dated — as a backdrop in considering the celebration of so many blacks on the election of President Obama can be helpful.

In cutting to the quick of Obama, there is an appreciation of him as articulate (I hated that reference to me by condescending teachers in school), self-disclosing and a brilliant, disciplined political mind. His list of personal and professional positives represents much of the best in the black community. And to see him appreciated so grandly gives us, and obviously many others, a sense of hope that we can be seen beyond the boxes that so often separate us from being seen as whole.

This is not to say that Mr. President is all-the-way on point. He is a politician. One who has manipulated circumstance, situation and stakeholders in ways that politicians do, and that's OK as long as there is an understanding of it all.

Just before the election of Mr. Obama to the presidency I opined that I'd sipped the Kool-Aid. I explained that I was a true believer, but only halfway. As with many who experience marginalization in this country, I believe in the ideal of American democracy — I dare say many black folk do. However that ideal has not been, nor is it now bound in one individual, no matter how cool and competent.

So, with President Obama there is true belief. His social standing and thoroughness gives us an opportunity to bet on black. He has allowed Us to step forward in this pivotal point in history.

Nonetheless, 'politics' is still 'politricks,' and we'd be wise to consider the words of Chuck D.

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The Takeaway

The President's shout-out to "nonbelievers"

Thursday, January 22, 2009

When he listed the diverse faiths of our nation in his inaugural address, President Obama chose to include nonbelievers, a group rarely acknowledged in official discourse. Randall Balmer, professor of American religious history at Barnard College and author of "God in The White House" joins John and Adaora to discuss the implications of the President's inclusion of atheists and agnostics as part of our spiritual community.

"I'm sure that maybe some Jains and Sikhs and Buddhists wished that their names had been mentioned in his laundry list as well."
— Barnard Professor Randall Balmer on the inclusion of nonbelievers in Obama's Inaugural Address

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The Takeaway

The morning after: Live from Washington, D.C.

Wednesday, January 21, 2009

The conclusion of the presidential Inauguration marks the end of what may have been the biggest party in U.S. history. Tens of thousands of people head back home today and the real work in the Capitol begins. The Takeaway checks in with two reporters who covered the inauguration. Josh Rogers is a political reporter for New Hampshire Public Radio and Ben Calhoun is a political reporter for Chicago Public Radio.

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The Takeaway

Video: "Section 1?" Andrea Bernstein finds her prime seat for the inauguration of Barack Obama

Wednesday, January 21, 2009

Follow Takeaway Political Director Andrea Bernstein to her prime, second-row seat at the inauguration of Barack Obama on January 20, 2009, in Washington, D.C.
Download the video
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The Takeaway

Top four things overheard at the inauguration

Wednesday, January 21, 2009

"I'd rather get a stimulus than a recovery."

"Look at this mob. It looks like a Will Smith movie here."

"Don't forget this is the city that greenlighted a trillion-dollar bailout and two days later couldn't figure out where the money had gone."

"Log cabin republicans? There are six, and they all hate themselves."

Watch Mary Beth Williams' collection of images from the Inauguration.

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The Takeaway

The picture of a presidential family

Wednesday, January 21, 2009

When President Obama was sworn in yesterday, he was surrounded by family. That family was a rainbow of colors and ethnicities including his Kenyan step-grandmother, his Indonesian-American half-sister, Michelle Obama's black cousins and brother, his Chinese-Canadian brother-in-law, and a rabbi. It is quite a change from the typical white Protestant presidential family. To discuss this changing American portrait we are joined by New York Times' writer Jodi Kantor.

For more, read Jodi Kantor's article, In First Family, a Nation’s Many Faces, in today's New York Times.

"Catholic passed for exotic."
— The New York Times' Jodi Kantor on the long history of White House residents being white and Protestant and how that is changing with the Obamas

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The Takeaway

Favorite part of the speech

Tuesday, January 20, 2009

Now safely inside and thawed (minus about seven layers of clothing) I’ve been listening to NPR, where the consensus seems to be that the speech was dark. But I found it strangely hopeful. After all, the revolutionary warriors made it through the icy waters, the soldiers whispering from Arlington are calling a nation to serve “something larger than themselves.” I find these encouraging words for dark times. But on the metro line waiting to leave the Capitol area, the emotional highlight of the day seems to have been the words “so help me God.” As one eight-year-old told me, on her way to the parade, “I liked it when he read the Bible.”

Read a transcript of President Obama's inaugural address and discuss it in The Takeaway's "user-annotated" document viewer.
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The Takeaway

"A long way to get here…"

Tuesday, January 20, 2009

Countless hours to arrive in Washington, six hours in sub-freezing temperatures, and some folks with tickets couldn’t even get in after the blue gate was shut down. Then it was a two-hour line just to get in to the Capital South metro station. Did it matter? Nope. A family from Rochdale Village, Queens, had a Plan B — they went to Cong. Gregory Meeks’s office in the Raeburn House Office Building — heated, with snacks — and watched it on TV. A young man from Scranton slipped in by walking around the crowd, but his friends were not so lucky. One woman from Philadelphia was relegated to the streets, far from the jumbotrons, where she clung to the event by listening to the cheers for the mall. She didn’t care, either. “We came a long way to get here,” she explained. “Oh,” I asked “Where are you from?” “No,” she corrected, “I mean a long way, in years.”
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The Takeaway

President Barack Obama's Inaugural Address (Transcript)

Tuesday, January 20, 2009

THANK YOU. THANK YOU. MY FELLOW CITIZENS, I STAND HERE TODAY HUMBLED BY THE TASK BEFORE US. GRATEFUL FOR THE TRUST YOU'VE BESTOWED, MINDFUL OF THE SACRIFICES BORNE BY OUR ANCESTORS.

I THANK PRESIDENT BUSH FOR HIS SERVICE TO OUR NATION. AS WELL AS ...

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The Takeaway

Made It! I'm at my seat

Tuesday, January 20, 2009

Two rows from the band, which is right in front of the podium. Dressed in four layers, rode a (full) metro at 4:30 a.m. By 4:45 a.m. the mall was filling with a crowd that just wanted to be a part of history — I met people from Alabama, Indiana, California, red states, blue states, the United States. People that just decided to come and people that bought tickets a year ago. They wanted to be part of something larger, and today they are.
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