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Immigration Reform

The Takeaway

Latino Registered Voters Less Likely to Vote This Year, Poll Finds

Wednesday, October 06, 2010

With less than a month until Election Day, Democrats are hoping to keep control of both the House and Senate while trying to appeal to their core constituencies. Just two years ago, President Obama brought the Democrats back to the White House with the help of Latino voters. Democrats will surely need those votes if they hope to keep their majorities in Congress, but it is not clear that the Latino votes will come through in the mid-terms.  A new poll from the Pew Hispanic Center reports that only 51 percent of Latino registered voters say they are "absolutely certain to vote," this season, compared to 70 percent of all registered voters who say they'll go to the polls.

Why is it looking like so many Latinos will skip voting November 2?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

30 Issues: Immigration

Monday, October 04, 2010

Randy Altschuler, Republican and Conservative Party nominee for Congress from New York's 1st District, talks about immigration, the role it plays on Long Island, and his belief in the need to enact strong reforms to stop illegal immigration.  Then, Chung-Wha Hong, executive director of the New York Immigration Coalition, talks about her organization's support of broad legalization and comprehensive immigration reform measures.

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The Takeaway

'Machete': 'A Trash Mexploitation Flick' Worth Seeing

Tuesday, September 07, 2010

As the debate over immigration rages on in the political spotlight, and candidates all over the country use the sensitive topic as a platform to gain votes for coming November election, Robert Rodriguez’s new movie, "Machete" does the same. Op/Ed pages contributing editor for The Los Angeles Times and creator of  Ask A Mexican, Gustavo Arellano, joins us to discuss Rodriguez's film and its satirical look at the immigration issue, corruption in politics and drug trafficking. He also revels in the revenge fantasy.

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The Takeaway

Univision Anchor Jorge Ramos Takes the Long View on SB 1070

Thursday, July 29, 2010

Jorge Ramos is an anchor on the Spanish language television network Univision, and author of A Country for All: An Immigrant Manifesto. A familiar face in Hispanic households across America, Ramos regularly covers the immigration debate. Ramos talks about Arizona's hobbled law, and where immigration reform can go from here. He says that the time is right for immigration reform, "but that nobody has the political courage in Congress to do something about it."

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Anti-Immigrant Attacks in Staten Island

Thursday, July 29, 2010

The Arizona immigration law, which goes into effect today, is shining a light on police interactions with immigrant populations around the country. Maria Hinojosa, host of Latino USA, and John Annese, reporter for the Staten Island Advance, discuss how the NYPD is surging into Staten Island after a wave of attacks on Mexicans.

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The Takeaway

Dolores Huerta Discusses SB 1070 Injunction

Thursday, July 29, 2010

Dolores Huerta co-founded the United Farm Workers of America alongside Cesar Chavez in 1962. Huerta coined the slogan "Si Se Puede." In the years since, she has gone on to mobilize countless unions, activists and Hispanic organizations. At 80 years old, Ms. Huerta shows no signs of slowing down. She responds to the injunction which blocks major parts of Arizona’s controversial anti-immigration law.

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The Takeaway

What's Next for Arizona Immigration Law?

Thursday, July 29, 2010

Federal Judge Susan Bolton issued a blow to Arizona's controversial immigration law Wednesday, blocking key parts of the law, including the provision that requires immigrants to carry their papers with them at all times. We take a look at how long the injunction will stay in place and what Arizona's next legal move might be. And we ask what this means for other states that want to craft their own immigration policies. 

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The Takeaway

Last Minute Ruling Holds Most Provisions of Arizona's Immigration Law

Thursday, July 29, 2010

Yesterday, just one day before Arizona's controversial immigration law was to go into effect, a federal judge put a last-minute hold on some of the most controversial parts of the law, including the requirement for immigrants to carry papers at all times, and the directive for officers to check the immigration status of people they detain for other reasons.

For civil rights groups who oppose the law, it's a last-minute reprieve. For law enforcement agencies who supported it, it's a disappointing setback. It's been a long three months for supporters and opponents alike since Arizona Governor Jan Brewer signed S.B. 1070 into law on April 23rd. 

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The Takeaway

The Challenges for Undocumented Students Seeking Higher Education

Wednesday, July 21, 2010

A new AP-Univision poll says more than eight out of ten Latinos in America believe the most important goal for high school graduates is to continue their educations.  94 percent of the more than 1,500 Latinos polled said they expect their children to go to college.

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The Takeaway

The Real American Lives of Immigrants in Reagan's 1986 Amnesty

Thursday, July 15, 2010

Arizona continues to attract the spotlight in the fiery immigration debate for taking a tough, conservative stance against undocumented immigrants. Their new law is the far end of the spectrum from more liberal reform proposals, like amnesty. It was, however, a conservative hero, President Ronald Reagan, who signed the last amnesty into law in 1986. 

Three million illegal immigrants were permitted to set roots and build lives in America on the books after the Simpson-Mazzoli Act granted them a path to citizenship while making hiring an undocumented worker a crime. So what happened to those three million? How did their lives unfold after an act of congress and the stroke of a pen protected their presence on our soil? 

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The Takeaway

Obama Administration Sues Arizona

Wednesday, July 07, 2010

The Obama administration has filed suit in federal court, challenging the constitutionality of Arizona’s tough, controversial new immigration law. SB1070 requires state and local police to question and possibly arrest those who exhibit reasonable suspicion of being in the country illegally. The justice department says that this is a federal job, which should not be handled by lcal law enforcement.

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The Takeaway

Immigrant Farm Workers Ask Americans to Take Their Jobs... Please

Wednesday, July 07, 2010

It’s perhaps the most common complaint levied against illegal immigrants – they are stealing American jobs and bringing down the economy. Now, the United Farm Workers of America is teaming up with "The Colbert Report" to offer farm worker jobs to any American who wants to take them. The organization is encouraging any unemployed Americans, Washington pundits and anti-immigrant activists to sign up for the Take Our Jobs campaign. They say that if you’re okay with long days under the hot sun, small paychecks, no overtime or workers compensation, they will happily train and set up Americans with farm jobs.

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The Takeaway

Univision's Jorge Ramos on President Obama's Immigration Policy

Monday, July 05, 2010

When President Obama spoke recently at American University School of International Service in Washington, D.C., Univision anchor Jorge Ramos was watching very closely. Ramos is a familiar face at Univision, the spanish-language network, and he's also been pressing the Obama Administration to make good on its campaign pledge to reform immigration laws. It's been an issue for Ramos since 2008, when Obama was fighting for the nomination. Ramos gleaned this pledge from him: “What I can guarantee,” Obama said, “is that we will have in the first year [of the presidency] an immigration bill that I strongly support.” Ramos called it “La Promesa de Obama,” and he's been pressing the administration to make good on it ever since.

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The Takeaway

Arizona Police Training Video Opens Window onto Law

Friday, July 02, 2010

When Arizona's controversial immigration law goes into effect at the end of this month, police officers will be under close scrutiny in their enforcement. A new video hopes to make Arizona's police force equal to that scrutiny. The video was required by Jan Brewer at the law's signing on April 23, and it's been mailed out to all 170 police districts the state. We speak with Larry Talvy, a marshal from Tombstone, Arizona, who has watched the video, about what anxieties it reveals and what situations it hopes to prevent. 

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The Takeaway

President Obama Addresses Immigration Reform

Thursday, July 01, 2010

President Barack Obama is scheduled to give a speech on comprehensive immigration reform at the American University School of International Service in Washington, D.C. today. This in the wake of Arizona's controversial immigration law, and the threat of other states passing their own immigration legislation. Valeria Fernandez, a reporter for Feet in Two Worlds — a project of the Center for New York City Affairs at The New School; and Maria Elena Salinas, an anchor at Univision, join us to talk about what they and the hispanic population hope the President will say in his speech.

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The Takeaway

Mexico Reacts to America's Immigration Policies

Thursday, May 20, 2010

Mexican President Felipe Calderon will address a joint session of Congress today, as he continues his visit to the United States. Yesterday he joined President Obama at the White House and spoke out against Arizona's recent immigration law.

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The Takeaway

New Mexico at Odds with Neighboring Arizona Over Immigration Policy

Wednesday, May 12, 2010

In the next few months, Arizona will begin to enforce its new immigration law that allows local law enforcement to ask for documentation from people they suspect of being in the country illegally. But its neighbor, New Mexico, vehemently opposes this law and its own House of Representatives has passed a resolution recognizing economic benefits for undocumented immigrants. The rift between the bordering states could make things tricky for law enforcement.

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The Takeaway

New Arizona Immigration Law Concerns Some Local Police

Tuesday, April 27, 2010

This weekend, Arizona Governor Jan Brewer signed into a law a controversial bill that gives local police the power to check documentation of anyone they suspect to be an illegal immigrant. It has sparked a fierce political debate and enraged many in the Hispanic community. But it has also raised concerns over how local police officers will go about enforcing the law and whether it will lead to racial profiling. Others worry it will burden officers who are already busy addressing other crimes in the state.

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: Immigration Reform in Democrat's Crosshairs, Your Take on Secret Recipes

Monday, April 26, 2010

  • CONGRESSIONAL TAKEOUT: Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich discusses the new sense of urgency in Washington for immigration reform, and how the Democrats' agenda might get disrupted as a result.
  • LISTENERS TAKEOUT:  Friday, we talked to Todd Wilbur, a cookbook author turned master in the art of cloning secret recipes. This morning, we hear your take on what makes you keep or share kitchen secrets.

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The Takeaway

Arizona's 'Safe Neighborhoods' Bill Signed into Law

Monday, April 26, 2010

Arizona Governor Jan Brewer followed tough words with tough action when signed the "Safe Neighborhoods" bill into law on Friday. State House Bill 1070 is considered to be the nation's strictest law against illegal immigration. Among other changes, the bill requires all immigrants to carry proper identification at all times and broadens the power of local police to detain anybody suspected of immigration violations. State and local leaders who support the bill praise its sweeping reforms and cite the state's violent crime rate as reason alone for strict measures. On the other side of the debate, activists and lawmakers, including President Obama, have called the bill a "misguided" attack on the "basic notions of fairness that we cherish as Americans."

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