Streams

 

 

Illness

The Leonard Lopate Show

Philip Galanes on the Best and Worst Ways to Console Someone

Wednesday, November 05, 2014

Philip Galanes, New York Times Social Q’s columnist gives advice on what to say—and do—for people dealing with illness or death in their families.

Comments [66]

99% Invisible

123- Snowflake

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Well before the early 1500s, when Sir Thomas Moore first coined the term "Utopia," people have been thinking about how to design their ideal community. Maybe it's one that doesn't use money, or one that drops traditional family structures and raises ch...

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Blogging Your Illness: "You're Not Doing This Alone"

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

A conversation has broken out online about how much information is too much information when it comes to blogging and tweeting about illness. The Brian Lehrer Show takes calls from those who write about their health on the sense of community, the role of humor, and the reasons people decide to share.

Comments [36]

The Brian Lehrer Show

AmeriCanada!; Pregnancy Myths; Evolutionary Medicine

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Journalist Diane Francis has a modest proposal: the U.S. and Canada should merge. She talks about what both countries could bring to the partnership. Plus: neuroscientist Sam Harris on lying; economist Emily Oster debunks pregnancy myths about what’s dangerous for a woman who is expecting; and a deep look at “mismatch diseases”; how to be a friend to a friend who is sick; and an urban monk talks about spirituality in the city.

Listen to Lucy

Distraction beats doctors for back pain relief

Monday, October 21, 2013

Distraction beats doctors for back pain relief

Comment

Radiolab

Hidden Truths

Thursday, August 01, 2013

Surprising truths hidden in plain sight.

Comments [4]

WNYC News

Possible Parasite Outbreak Sickens New Jerseyans

Thursday, July 25, 2013

WNYC

A parasite usually found in tropical or subtropical nations may have found its way to New Jersey and six other states, making some people sick, officials say.

Comment

WNYC News

Yes, Flu Season is Worse this Year

Thursday, January 10, 2013

New York is among 29 states reporting high levels of flu-like illnesses, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Comment

Operavore

Coughy Talk

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Classical concert-going is sometimes criticized as too formal and rigid. But blogger Fred Plotkin believes that more restraint is needed when it comes to one common audience affliction: uninhibited coughing.

Read More

Comments [15]

The Takeaway

Cancer as Silent Killer in 'Memoir of a Debulked Woman'

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Ovarian cancer is called the silent killer. Most women don’t receive a diagnosis until the disease has spread, until the chances for survival have dwindled. Once diagnosed, the treatment might be just as bad as the disease, as Dr. Vivian Bearing, the main character in Margaret Edson’s play “Wit," explains: "I am in isolation because I am being treated for cancer," she says. "My treatment imperils my health. Herein lies the paradox." Like Vivian Bearing, Susan Gubar is a professor of English, coping with ovarian cancer. Yet Professor Gubar's story of diagnosis and treatment is quite different from the one Margaret Edsons chronicles in "Wit."

Comments [1]

Strangers

Stephen Rochelle: A Father’s Story

Friday, December 16, 2011

In July 2011, Matthew Rochelle stood trial for murder. This is the story of what happened from the point of view of his father, Stephen Rochelle.

Comment

Operavore

The Wound That Does Not Heal

Friday, December 09, 2011

How does illness or disability affect creative and performing artists? As blogger Fred Plotkin writes, this question has confronted artists from Mahler and Britten to James Levine and Thomas Quasthoff.

Read More

Comments [4]

The Takeaway

Are Profits Driving Medical Research?

Tuesday, October 04, 2011

On April 12, 1955, Edward R. Murrow interviewed Dr. Jonas Salk on the CBS show, "See it Now." Salk’s polio vaccine had just been proven effective in preventing the disease. Murrow asked who owned the vaccine. "The people I would say," Salk answered. "There is no patent. Could you patent the sun?" Medical research culture has changed dramatically since Salk's time. Had it been invented today, it seems likely that the polio vaccine would have been patented immediately, and that Salk would have worked for a pharmaceutical company, rather than a university.

Comments [6]

The Takeaway

Caring for Loved Ones with Alzheimer's

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

One in eight people over age 65 suffers from Alzheimer's disease. Most patients develop late-onset Alzheimer's. Scientists have found a predisposing genetic risk factor for this type of the disease, and while they have yet to discover a direct genetic link, researchers have isolated the early-onset Alzheimer’s gene. Early-onset Alzheimer's is rare, affecting only five percent of Alzheimer’s patients. But it can strike as early as 30, with devastating consequences for the patient and their families. Many families are unprepared for the difficult decisions caregivers face when their loved ones are diagnosed with early- or late-onset Alzheimer's. 


Comment

The Takeaway

Facing the Facts On What We Eat

Wednesday, June 08, 2011

More than 2,000 people are sick and 20 dead in Germany from an E. coli outbreak that German officials still don't know the source of. The scare has spread to the U.S., where many are worried about a similar outbreak happening here. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, reported Tuesday that most food-borne illnesses were down, except for salmonella and a group of rare E. coli bacteria related to the German one. Is hysteria warranted?

Comments [1]

The New Yorker: Out Loud

Rachel Aviv on patients who deny their mental illness

Monday, May 23, 2011

Rachel Aviv on patients who deny their mental illness.

Comment

Radio Rookies

My Mother's Disease

Friday, October 09, 2009

At 17-years-old, Vikky Cruz struggles to cope with her mother's illness, a rare gentetic disease called neuroacanthytosis, and the ways it's taken over the mother she once knew.

Comments [1]

On Being

Dan and Sue Hanson — Room for J: One Family's Struggle with Schizophrenia [remix]

Thursday, May 04, 2006

Joel Hanson has schizophrenia and believes he is God. His parents reflect on living with their son and how they have learned to see mental illness, normalcy, and religion differently. Is there room in our culture to consider a schizophrenic personality as

Comment

Radio Rookies

My Family Remembers

Friday, February 24, 2006

Just three out of every million Americans are diagnosed each year with a potentially fatal blood disease called Aplastic Anemia. Edward was one of them.

Comment