Streams

 

 

Hurricane Sandy

Schoolbook

Back to School Business: What's Delayed, What's Still On

Friday, November 09, 2012

Despite the storm's disruption to the school-year calendar, the Department of Education is moving ahead with tests and meetings scheduled this month and next, beginning with the first Parent Academy workshops on Saturday.

Read More

Comment

Transportation Nation

Another Transpo Impact of Sandy: Higher Used Car Prices

Friday, November 09, 2012

(Photo CC by Flickr user bcostin)


(Stacey Vanek Smith -- Marketplace) The Northeast is still picking up the pieces from Hurricane Sandy and the nor'easter earlier this week. Many people are still without power and thousands of homes were damaged. On top of that, an estimated 250,000 cars were totaled, a pile up that could affect American consumers across the country.

Hurricane Sandy is expected to tack $200 to $300 onto the price of a used car, according to Jonathan Banks, executive automotive analyst at the National Automobile Dealers Association, or NADA. "Many vehicles are going to be destroyed meaning that many consumers are going to have to replace their cars."

Some people will opt to buy used cars, and that will put the squeeze on an already tight supply, says Richard Arca, a senior analyst with Edmunds.com: "The problem with used cars over the past couple years is a lack of inventory."

That's because many Americans put off buying new cars during the recession. Now the number of used cars seven years and younger is at an all time low.

Used car buyers all over the country will feel the impact, says NADA's Jonathan Banks, "This impact will wash across the whole country and people will feel the price increases even as far out as California."

Auto dealers in storm-hit areas will start pulling in used cars from all over the U.S. to meet the spike in demand. Banks says we’ve seen this before. Hurricane Katrina pushed used car prices up three percent nationally.

Read More

Comments [2]

Schoolbook

The View From The Eye Of The Storm

Friday, November 09, 2012

The principal of Scholars' Academy in Rockaway Park, one of the schools relocated after Sandy, says he has witnessed countless acts of compassion and kindness since the storm devastated his community.

Read More

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

After Sandy: Long Island Power and LIPA

Friday, November 09, 2012

Gus Garcia-Roberts, Newsday reporter, discusses the ongoing power outages on Long Island and discusses charges by Governor Cuomo and others that energy provider LIPA is failing to meet the recovery needs there. 

Comments [22]

WNYC News

Mayor Says Public Housing Should Get Power Back by Saturday

Friday, November 09, 2012

Mayor Michael Bloomberg says most of New York City's public housing residents should have electricity by Saturday and heat by early next week.

Comments [1]

WNYC News

In Lower Manhattan, Sandy Grounds Some High-Rise Residents for Months

Friday, November 09, 2012

Beth Rice lives with her husband in a one-bedroom rental on the 11th floor of a luxury high-rise in the financial district. So while much of Manhattan begins to return to business as usual after the storm, Rice and her husband spent last week holed up in a 90-square-foot Midtown hotel room for $165 a night.

Comments [7]

Schoolbook

A New Co-Location Issue: Shelters and Schools

Thursday, November 08, 2012

While the use of school buildings as shelters makes sense in the short term they are not necessarily meant for the long-term sheltering of displaced people. Take a listen to the discussion about school facilities and emergency planning.

Read More

Comment

Schoolbook

Sandy Shakes Ups Enrollment and Attendance

Thursday, November 08, 2012

The latest data from Tweed shows fluid movement among school districts and neighborhoods as students displaced by Sandy find new or temporary schools. Attendance rate for the relocated students was just 30 percent on Thursday.

Read More

Comment

WNYC News

In Sandy's Wake, Aquarium Struggling to Stay Afloat

Thursday, November 08, 2012

The New York Aquarium on Coney Island is closed indefinitely after it was pounded by Sandy's storm surge. The boardwalk aquarium is home to 12,000 marine animals.

Comment

Last Chance Foods

Last Chance Foods: Post-Sandy Farm Report

Thursday, November 08, 2012

Farmers from around the area are making repairs, cleaning up, and getting back to their markets. Last Chance Foods spoke with farmers in Long Island and New Jersey and got the latest news from New York City's farmers markets.

Comments [1]

Transportation Nation

How NY's MTA Restored Service...to the Subway Map

Thursday, November 08, 2012

The MTA's Chuck Gordanier, holding up the Hurricane Sandy Recovery Service subway map (photo by Kate Hinds)

If you looked at the MTA’s website in the days following Hurricane Sandy, you probably saw a subway map (pdf) that wasn’t what most straphangers were used to.

To protect New York City’s subway system, all transit shut down in advance of the storm. But then the under-river subway tunnels flooded, and the MTA had to convey to riders what was and wasn’t running.

That’s Chuck Gordanier's job, and he began booting up his Mac before the storm even ended.

He’s a manager at the transit agency. His task was -- and is -- to quickly translate the continuous service changes into a stripped-down map. So he began subtracting subway lines and stations. At first he thought the result was almost too harsh.

"But then once I saw this I thought ‘hey, that kind of fits the mood, doesn’t it?’" he said. "So I just kept stripping it down, taking everything off. The ferries weren’t going, why should they be there? The parks were closed, remember? So why should the parks be there? So I just took out everything that wasn’t actually happening and ended up with this."

The map, shown on screen in Adobe Illustrator. (Photo by Kate Hinds)

'This' is the subway recovery map, and it’s a stark contrast to the normal one. No perks, like neighborhood names, landmarks, or even the street grid. Just colored lines on a gray and white background showing what’s operational, and shaded out lines showing what isn’t. Gordanier’s been working 14-hour days to keep the map current. As in: power’s been restored to lower Manhattan? Color in the 1 train. The Joralemon Tunnel’s been pumped dry? Color in the four and five. Lather, rinse, repeat.

A list of the dozens of changes Gordanier made to the subway map since Hurricane Sandy. (Photo by Kate Hinds)

"When I had it done," he said, "and it was right, then we’d put it on the website right away and we’d roll out a quickie print version to post." Gordanier says it’s a matter of turning on and off some of the 50-plus layers that make up the map. He demonstrates how to power up the G line. "First I've got to find the G train layer," he said, clicking the mouse to unlock it. "There’s the G train--see that, 30 percent? Boing. There it is. Full strength."

(He got to do that for real Wednesday, when it began running again.)

Gordanier says he’ll keep updating the MTA’s subway recovery service map until things get back to normal. Until then, it’s a work in progress.

"Today, later," he said, "it will probably be different."

Example: two hours before this story aired on WNYC, the MTA restored full service on the L line.

Watch the return of subway service below.
Follow TN on TwitterFacebook, or Tumblr.

Read More

Comments [4]

Transportation Nation

WATCH: The New York City Subway Comeback, in GIF

Thursday, November 08, 2012


WNYC's Data News team has turned the city's post-Sandy recovery into a time-lapse GIF. Click through for the full image.

Read More

Comments [1]

Schoolbook

Rockaways School Lands Across the Bay

Thursday, November 08, 2012

As of Thursday morning, the Education Department said all schools are open to students for the first time since Sandy hit the region. Many students expressed relief to be back, even though some are getting used to life in new buildings for the foreseeable future. Students from Scholars' Academy in the Rockaways settled in to a new home at P.S. 13 in East New York.

Read More

Comment

Transportation Nation

Flooded Out Staten Islander Preps for Second Blow From Nor'easter

Thursday, November 08, 2012

Stephen Drimalas surveys his flooded-out home in Ocean Breeze, Staten Island. (Jim O'Grady/WNYC)

Staten Islander Stephen Drimalas is one of thousands of New Yorkers who are still without power. He's digging out from Sandy, showing up sporadically to his city job and, as of Wednesday, riding out a nor'easter.

The 46-year-old Drimalas lives alone in a small house in Ocean Breeze, Staten Island, a neighborhood that the storm submerged under eight feet of water. He works for the city Department of Transportation, installing signs and Muni meters. Seven years ago, he moved from Brooklyn to this modest beachfront neighborhood on Staten Island's east shore because it was cheap, beautiful and near the water.

He knew flooding was a possibility. So a year ago, he built a new foundation and raised his house by four feet. The night Sandy hit, he stepped outside to smoke a cigarette and check on conditions.

"As soon as I opened the door, the water started pouring down," he said. "By the time I got to my car, the water was up to my shin. Another minute or two and I wasn't getting out. That's how fast it came in."

Drimalas fled with the clothes on his back and some papers he managed to grab. Everything else was destroyed, including a set of appliances he'd just loaded into his house at the end of a year-long renovation.

He escaped but his neighbor, 89-year-old Ella Norris, did not. "She lived with her daughter here on Buel," Drimalas said on Monday as he stood outside Ella's house, his neighbors circulating around him as they cleaned and salvaged what they could. "She and her daughter got trapped in the house. Her daughter survived. Ella's in the funeral home right now. They're having a service for her, as we speak."

Drimalas has spent the last ten days piling garbage on the street and digging out from the mud, calling FEMA and trying to contact his insurance company. On nights when a friend can't put him up, he sleeps in his car.

Now comes a nor'easter with snow and slashing rain, high winds and forecasts of flooding. When reached by cell phone, Drimalas described how he was preparing for a second blow.

"I'm getting all the garbage out in case any winds pick up," he said. He added that he was hoping to stay with a friend, before cutting short the call. "I'm working outside," he said. "I gotta go."

To see more photos of Drimalas and his neighborhood, go here.

Read More

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Beach Erosion from Sandy

Thursday, November 08, 2012

Stewart Farrell, director and founder of the Coastal Research Center at The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, discusses beach loss and dune erosion along the Jersey shoreline in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.

 

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Nor'easter Follows Sandy

Thursday, November 08, 2012

It was another cold night for many in the northeast. Hundreds of thousands without power had to withstand the power of a nor'easter storm that brought snow to places still recovering from Sandy. New Jersey Public Radio reporter Scott Gurian reports from the affected area.

Comments [1]

Schoolbook

New Dorp HS Welcomes Displaced Middle Schoolers

Thursday, November 08, 2012

With dozens of schools still damaged or without power, entire school communities have re-located to temporary locations. The 2700-student body and staff at New Dorp High School on Staten Island made room for I.S. 2 which can't move back to its building for at least a few weeks. It was a logistical feat that students and educators said went well on its first day despite a few bumps.

Read More

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

After Sandy: Insurance Help

Thursday, November 08, 2012

J. Robert Hunter, director of Insurance for the Consumer Federation of America and former federal insurance administrator under Presidents Ford Carter, talks about how the insurance industry is reacting to the damage from Sandy and answers insurance questions from listeners.

 

Comments [8]

The Brian Lehrer Show

After Sandy: Housing Recovery

Thursday, November 08, 2012

Eric Lipton, Washington correspondent for The New York Times, discusses the government effort to provide housing assistance for those displaced by Sandy. Then, WNYC reporter Cindy Rodriguez talks about local aid for the displaced. 

 

Comments [18]

WNYC News

Specialized NYPD Unit Works in Unexpected Ways Post-Sandy

Wednesday, November 07, 2012

WNYC

Some residents in areas hard hit by Sandy say they’ve been left on their own to cope with the severe damage inflicted by the storm — supplies are limited and help has been slow to reach them. It may seem uncharacteristic, but the New York Police Department’s Emergency Service Unit has been doing more than its usual tactical support or rescues.

Comments [3]