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Hurricane Sandy

Schoolbook

News of Shortened Vacation Sparks Range of Reactions

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Not everyone was pleased to hear that the public schools' February break would be cut short to make up days lost to Sandy but most people acknowledged the D.O.E. didn't have many other options.

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Transportation Nation

Staten Island To Get A Second Ferry...Briefly

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Map of the temporary ferry terminal in Great Kills Park (image courtesy of NYC DOT)

The dream of a South Shore ferry for Staten Island will soon be a reality -- albeit a fleeting one.

To improve the post-Sandy commute for some of the hardest-hit areas of the southernmost borough, New York City is soliciting bids for temporary ferry service from Great Kills to two separate points in Manhattan. The service -- which will be made possible by FEMA funding -- is expected to be up and running by Monday, November 26th.

The existing Staten Island Ferry operates between the northern tip of the borough -- difficult to get to for residents further afield -- to the Battery in lower Manhattan, which is experiencing its own issues: the South Ferry subway station, seriously damaged during the storm surge, remains closed.

This isn't the first time the idea of a ferry on the southern tip of the island has been raised. According to a story earlier this year in the Staten Island Advance, there was a 1997 plan to operate a fast ferry between Great Kills Harbor and Manhattan, but it  "was thwarted by community opposition."

A press release from the city says the service will operate for eight weeks and will include "six trips leaving a newly-constructed landing at Great Kills between 6:00 AM and 9:00 AM, bound for Pier 11 at Wall Street and continuing on to 35th Street, and six return departures in the afternoon, between 12:00 Noon to 6:15 PM. The one-way fare will be $2.00, comparable to fares for temporary ferry routes established in the Rockaways."

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WNYC News

Police: Sandy Flooding May Have Damaged Evidence

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Sandy may have wiped out DNA and other physical evidence stored at a facility in Brooklyn, police officials said Tuesday.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

New York Recovering

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Kenneth T. Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences at Columbia University and author of The Encyclopedia of New York City: Second Edition, talks about how New York recovered from previous disasters.

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Schoolbook

Mid-Winter Break Shortened For Extra Class Time

Monday, November 19, 2012

Union leaders reached agreement with the city to swap three vacation days in February for school days and return a clerical half day to one more day of instruction to make up for learning time lost to the Sandy and its aftermath.

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WNYC News

Dramatic Drop in the Number of Summonses, Tickets After Sandy

Monday, November 19, 2012

WNYC

In the aftermath of the storm, thousands of police officers were assigned to extended tours of duty in parts of the city without power or to help keep order at the gas pumps. The NYPD said crime dipped in the days since Sandy, and according to the Office of Court Administration, so did the number of summonses.

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WNYC News

Soup Kitchens, Food Pantries Help Storm Victims While Struggling, Too

Monday, November 19, 2012

The Food Bank for New York City distributes emergency food to pantries and soup kitchens across the city and says since Sandy hit its delivered half a million meals to affected areas. But it's questioning how long it can keep up the pace.

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Transportation Nation

(Audio) NJ Transit Assailed for Lack of Information, Poor Planning

Monday, November 19, 2012

Bay Head Comet III's with debris (photo by NJ Transit via flickr)

New Jersey's commuter rail system returned to its normal schedule on several lines today, but delays continue to hamper commuters, and three weeks after Sandy, there are still questions about how well prepared the agency was for the storm.

While the NYC MTA, the agency that runs the New York subway system, has received high marks for preparation and response to the unprecedented flooding, NJ Transit has drawn the ire of its riders for a slower restoration of service and a lag in communicating what was working and what wasn't so that New Jersey commuters could plan their altered, and lengthened commutes.

Josh Crandall who created a website called Clever Commute, where people share information about NJ Transit delays with each other because traditionally that information hasn't been provided by NJ Transit fast enough. He was hearing from a lot of people who were upset by the lack of communication.

"People just didn't know: are they going to be without train service for two days, four days, of four weeks," he said.

New Jersey Transit spokesperson Nancy Snyder has repeatedly told Transportation Nation the reason for the delays is the "unprecedented damage” from Sandy. She was unable to provide an exact accounting of the damage even weeks later, though it was certainly extensive, including a boggling range of obstacles from piles of boats on top of rail lines, washouts, floods, and trenches of dead carp rotting by the rail lines.

This weekend Reuters reported that NJ Transit stored some rail cars in areas at risk of flooding, hampering the agency's ability to restore service quickly. NJ Transit parked some trains in Hoboken, which is four feet above sea level, and in Kearney Junction, in the Meadowlands, a swamp under normal conditions. Both got flooded with sea water damaging trains.

New Jersey Public Radio's Nancy Solomon recaps the NJ Transit response in this interview with WNYC's Richard Hake.

Listen:

Bay Head Comet III's with debris (photo by NJ Transit via flickr)
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WNYC News

Q&A | How the City Decides to Raze Sandy-Damaged Homes

Monday, November 19, 2012

WNYC

The city says some of the homes most damaged by Sandy are going to have to be bulldozed, but there's a lot of confusion over whose home and where.

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New Jersey News

In Looking to Rebuild the Jersey Shore, the Debate is Over How

Monday, November 19, 2012

There's no question that New Jersey will rebuild its shoreline in the wake of Sandy. But the real question is whether the Jersey Shore will be built smarter and stronger.

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Transportation Nation

The H Train Rides Again in the Rockaways

Monday, November 19, 2012

(For the full NYC subway map, go here.)

The H train is rolling where the A train can't.

Starting Tuesday, residents of the storm-battered Rockaway Peninsula will get a free subway shuttle known as the H train. To connect Beach 67 Street to Beach 90, the train will incorporate a piece of rarely-used track known as the Hammels Wye.

Currently, A train service to Queens terminates at Howard Beach. According to a press release issued by New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, the tracks over Jamaica Bay were "almost completely destroyed by the storm." Residents have been using shuttle buses to connect to mainland Queens as well as navigate the peninsula.

There are no estimates yet as to when full A train service will be back up and running.

(Note: according to the MTA, the appellation "H" is unrelated to Hammels. Shuttle service began on the Rockaways in 1956; by 1962, it was called the "HH." )

To get subway service out to the Rockaways, the MTA loaded subway cars onto flatbed trucks in Ozone Park, Queens, drove them over the Cross Bay Veterans Memorial Bridge, and lifted them back on the rails at the Rockaway Park-Beach 116 station. That work can be seen in the below video.

The H still exists on the rolls of the MTA -- as captured in the 2008 photo below.

An H train, spotted in 2008 (photo by SaikoSakura via flickr)

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: Occupy Sandy Proves its Progressive Mettle in Hurricane Relief

Monday, November 19, 2012

Hurricane Sandy revealed the strengths of a volunteer-driven cooperative relief effort pulling from the core values, relationships and skills of the Zuccotti Park movement.

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Schoolbook

Students Powered Our School's Recovery

Monday, November 19, 2012

An elementary school teacher sings the praises of his school community as it absorbed the repercussions from Sandy and prepared to return to its building in Rockaway Park, Queens.

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Schoolbook

A Twice Relocated School Strives to Regain Footing

Saturday, November 17, 2012

Twelve more city schools will re-open on Monday, after having relocated because of storm damage from Sandy. Relocating has been an unsettling experience for teachers and students. It was especially challenging at the Goldie Maple School, from the Rockaways, which was moved twice and split between different sites in the last three weeks.

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Schoolbook

High School Deadlines Extended As Schools Continue Recovery

Friday, November 16, 2012

The number of displaced schools is dropping to 18, as 12 schools and programs return to their repaired buildings on Monday.

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WNYC News

Rebuilding After Sandy: Small Property Owner Learns Lessons from Disaster

Friday, November 16, 2012

The Far Rockaway peninsula is a sandy spit that hooks out of southern Queens, and was one of the worst hit areas during Hurricane Sandy. Rockaway Beach Boulevard is the main artery where many live, shop and  work.  Ken Swan is a small property owner whose four, 2-story apartment buildings were devestated.  FEMA doesn't cover the costs, because they're rentals, and its his primary source of income.

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WNYC News

For Many Volunteers, Disaster Response is Double-Duty

Friday, November 16, 2012

WNYC

In the wake of Sandy, thousands of Red Cross volunteers deployed to hard-hit areas. At the same time the group is responding to other disasters that occur on a daily basis.

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WNYC News

Tourism at South Street Seaport Hit Hard By Sandy

Friday, November 16, 2012

When Sandy blew into the South Street Seaport the night of October 29, the neighborhood's quaint red-brick buildings were quickly submerged in a raging river full of timber, debris, street signs and fuel oil.

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Studio 360

Redesigning the Waterfront Post-Sandy

Friday, November 16, 2012

“Superstorm” Sandy has made it clear that flooding is not only a New Orleans problem: some of the country’s densest population centers are also extremely vulnerable to rising sea levels and storm surges.  For cities like New York, the waterfront is a design problem ...

Slideshow: Redesigning Lower Manhattan

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WNYC News

How to Help | Post-Sandy Holidays

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Looking to help a family affected by Hurricane Sandy? We're collecting a list of places to donate, volunteer and receive help for the holidays.

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