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Hurricane Sandy

Operavore

Sandy Meets The Tempest: The Met Opera Reopens

Thursday, November 01, 2012

After cancelling performances for two days, the Met returned Wednesday with – ironically – a scheduled performance of The Tempest, an opera based on Shakespeare by Thomas Adès.

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The Takeaway

How to Disaster-Proof a Cellphone Network

Thursday, November 01, 2012

It wasn’t just power that went out for hundreds of thousands of people across the northeast. Cell reception — even in areas with power — has been spotty at best, and frequently entirely absent.

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Schoolbook

School Buildings Serve As Refuges For Evacuees

Thursday, November 01, 2012

School Buildings were a refuge for many people evacuated from Zone A areas over the weekend. SchoolBook spent time at one school serving dozens of families in crisis.

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WNYC News

Your Post-Sandy Questions, Answered

Thursday, November 01, 2012

We're collecting your questions about city and regional services here, and answering the ones we can.

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Schoolbook

Schools Closed Until Monday; Staff Returns Friday

Thursday, November 01, 2012

The storm known as Sandy has shut down the schools for the rest of the week. Families scrambled to adjust their schedules and city crews started repairs on the 200 damaged school buildings.

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It's A Free Country ®

Explainer: How to Vote After Sandy

Thursday, November 01, 2012

As the region has focused on recovery efforts post-Sandy, local election officials have been working to make sure polling locations have power, displaced voters have access to absentee ballots, and any changes to polling locations gets communicated to a distracted public.  

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Public Housing Post-Sandy

Thursday, November 01, 2012

WNYC reporter Marianne McCune talks about her post-Sandy visit to LaGuardia Houses on the Lower East Side.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Finding Answers

Thursday, November 01, 2012

We're collecting questions and answers about problems and solutions to post-Sandy problems.  Guests include NYC Public Advocate Bill De Blasio and Patricia Smith, first deputy commissioner of NYC's Human Resources Administration

See "Your Post-Sandy Questions, Answered" at WNYC News.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Westchester / Rockland Check-In

Thursday, November 01, 2012

Westchester County Executive Robert Astorino and Rockland County Executive C. Scott Vanderhoef discuss the damage in their counties.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

More on the Aftermath of Superstorm Sandy

Thursday, November 01, 2012

Andrea Bernstein, David Furst, Richard Hake and Bob Hennelly of WNYC's newsroom check in on water advisories in New Jersey and transit developments in the area.  Plus, FEMA coordinator Mike Byrne calls in and WNYC's Stephen Nessen from Breezy Point.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Cleaning up after Sandy

Thursday, November 01, 2012

Larry Ubell, one of our gurus of how-to, is back again to talk about how to safely repair damage to your home after Hurricane Sandy—how to deal with flooding, downed trees, electricity issues, leaks and more. Call in with your questions at 646-829-3980!

Do you have questions about repairing your home after the storm? Let us know!

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Transportation Update

Thursday, November 01, 2012

Transportation Nation gives us an update on the subway, train, and airport service, and the reopening of roads in the New York area.  

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Sandy and Climate Change

Thursday, November 01, 2012

Andy Revkin, blogger for New York Times Dot Earth discusses climate change and Superstorm Sandy.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Congressman Bob Turner on Breezy Point

Thursday, November 01, 2012

Rep. Bob Turner (R-NY) is one of the many residents of Breezy Point, Queens who lost their homes in a fire during the superstorm. 

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Transportation Nation

My Wednesday #Commutefail

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

No fares = back door boarding -- IF you could get on (photo by Kate Hinds)

I left my Upper West Side apartment at 9:53 this morning, aiming for an M7 or M11 bus -- only to see a packed M11 pulling out of the bus stop on Columbus Avenue and 80th Street, leaving a trail of would-be passengers in its crowded wake.

The Columbus Avenue bus was my stand-in for the C train, which I normally take down to Spring Street. I had adjusted my expectations about my Wednesday commute, but even in the new reality of post-Sandy transportation it was grueling.

I had ridden my bike the 80+ blocks to work on Tuesday, which I often do -- but the return trip home, in the dark, with no streetlights, was harrowing. So I was glad to see the return of some transit.

But by 10:12 a group of us were still waiting for a downtown bus we could actually get on. I was busy both talking to people and eavesdropping (overheard at the bus stop: one man complained to his friend that he was sorry he sold his car; his friend said to him "man, you don't want to own a car in New York -- it's too expensive!")

A couple of crosstown M79s went by, comparatively empty. The crosstown bus line -- often used by people getting to subway lines on either side of Central Park -- was nowhere near as popular as the uptown/downtown ones.

 

New Yorkers who wanted to go downtown could only gawk in envy at the relatively empty M79s (photo by Kate Hinds)

"The crosstown was terrific," said woman I spoke to. Sue Breger was going from her home on East End Avenue to her office at Primary Stages, on 38th and 8th. She was one of the few sanguine commuters I spoke to. "I think we've been through worse, and I love this city," she said.

By 10:20, two M7s had come and gone, too full to pack on to. A few minutes later, two M11s followed, so crowded that people were riding in the door wells. By 10:38, I was debating the merits of bailing on Columbus with another woman, only to be told by a third person that the lines -- and gridlock -- on Broadway were no better. I considered the M10 on Central Park West and discarded it, for the simple reason that I rarely see it running on a good day.

Meanwhile, I waited. I felt like a desert island castaway, ceaselessly tracking the horizon for rescue. "I think I see an M7! I think it has room! Oh, never mind, it's too crowded."

At 11:05, I was able to push my way onto an M11.

Welcome to your Wednesday morning, post-Sandy commute (photo by Kate Hinds)

But did I mention what Columbus Avenue looked like?

Sure, you can get on a bus, but will it actually move in this traffic? (Photo of Columbus Avenue by Kate Hinds)

Twenty-three minutes later, I had only gone 15 blocks. Which was a walk in the park compared to a man whose personal space I was invading. Newman (as he identified himself) had been on the M11 for two hours, after boarding at 125th Street. "My shift started at 10," he said. "It's terrible." He was trying to get to his job at B&H photo on 34th Street. "I don't know why, but they're open," he said. "But that's business."

At that point, I overheard a woman talking to a friend on her cellphone. "I want to go to Dubai or Monaco," she said wistfully. "Places you go to by helicopter or Maserati."

Our unMaserati-like pace gave me plenty of time to meditate on what was slowing progress: hyper-crowded roads hampered by the dangling crane at 57th Street, which had caused street closures. Another complicating factor: Columbus Avenue turns into Ninth Avenue, which runs into...the Lincoln Tunnel, the only avenue of egress to New Jersey on Wednesday morning. And there was undoubtedly a ripple effect caused by the power outages south of 26th Street on the West Side.

By 11:40 a.m., I was only on 57th Street, and had gotten the word from my editor to return home. I made it back to my apartment, on foot, in under 30 minutes.

 

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WNYC News

Setting Up ‘Home’ Inside an Evacuation Shelter

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Some people who fled their homes in Lower Manhattan, hunkering down in a city evacuation center, moved again after the power went out Monday night. They’re now staying at a school on the Upper West Side, trying to make the best out of the situation as they wait for the all clear to go home.

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WNYC News

Cuomo: Helicopter Survey of Sandy Damage ‘Disturbing’

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Governor Andrew Cuomo took a helicopter tour of areas devastated from Hurricane Sandy, along with New York's Senators Chuck Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand. He says the state faces "significant" challenges to rebuild, and will have to "fundamentally" rethink  New York City's infrastructure going forward.

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WNYC News

Area Hospitals Lean On One Another in Storm's Aftermath

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

After days operating on a backup generator, Bellevue Hospital is "pulling the plug," according to one official. About 500 patients, including about 50 prisoners from city jails, are being evacuated.

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Transportation Nation

Amtrak to Restore NYC Train Service Friday

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Amtrak said limited Northeast Corridor service to New York City will resume on Friday.

Until then,  train travelers heading south need to get themselves to Newark where Amtrak service cuts off until New Haven, Conn. On Friday, regional service will run, but not the Acela. A schedule will be released Thursday.

Amtrak is still pumping water from tunnels under the Hudson river and running modified service on 10 routes with three lines canceled.

The Northeast corridor is the busiest rail corridor in the nation. More travelers use the train between New York and Boston and Nwe York and Washington than all airlines combined.

For the latest update information always check our Hurricane Transit Tracker. And for context see our last dispatch on Amtrak recovery, our broader past coverage on the rail company.
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WNYC News

Sandy Derails Nets Season Opener

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

It was expected to be the match to launch the rivalry. The NY Knicks vs. The Brooklyn Nets at Barclays Center Thursday night. Instead, Mayor Michael Bloomberg urged that the game be delayed, and the NBA agreed.

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