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Hurricane Sandy

On The Media

Hurricane Hoaxes and Confused Reporting

Friday, November 02, 2012

The 24-hour news cycle and social media provided consumers with up to the minute images and information about the toll of Sandy. Too bad some of those images and information were both woefully incorrect and deliberately misleading. Brooke and Bob talk to the New Jersey Record's John Brennan and Salon's Laura Miller about how disasters plunge us into a media mix of the real, the unreal, and the unknown.

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On The Media

How to Sort Good information from Bad on Twitter

Friday, November 02, 2012

Last week's storm highlighted Twitter's role as a useful (and occasionally infuriating) source of information during an emergency. OTM producer PJ Vogt talks to Bob about how to find accurate information on the platform while mostly avoiding the chaff. 

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Studio 360

Getting Creative During the Superstorm

Friday, November 02, 2012

Many of us in the Northeast had our routines upended by Superstorm Sandy this week. Here at Studio 360, we've been scrambling around Brooklyn — using laptops, kitchen tables, and borrowed studios to record and assemble the show. That makeshift spirit made us wonder if any listeners shut in by ...

Bonus Track: a piano composition inspired by Sandy

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WNYC News

Storm Challenges Compounding for Newark Residents

Thursday, November 01, 2012

This week’s storm knocked out power for 95 percent of Newark residents. It’s coming back now, neighborhood by neighborhood. But as the week wears on, residents are realizing electricity is just part of the challenges they now have to contend with.

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Transportation Nation

Subway Flooding Predicted, Eerily Matches Climate Change Model

Thursday, November 01, 2012

The subway map after flooding in 7 tunnels and a power outage suspended service to much of Manhattan in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, Nov 1, 2012

Compare that map with this one we posted a year ago after Hurricane Irene gave us a taste of what water could do to a transit system.

With Sea Level Rise, Subways Flood in 40 Minutes During Intense Storms (Map Courtesy LDEO & Civil Engineering, Columbia University)

Four days after Hurricane Sandy slammed New York, a huge chunk of New York’s subway remains closed.  Experts say the cost to the economy could run to the hundreds of millions.

Turns out they say the threat of rising sea levels coupled with big storms like Sandy’s to the city’s subway system – and its economy – was both predicted and predictable under models of rising sea levels.

New York’s Governor, Andrew Cuomo says New York has to rebuild its subway system to make it less vulnerable to storms like Irene and Sandy, which hit New York just fourteen months apart. “Part of learning from this is the recognition that climate change is a reality, extreme weather is a reality, it is a reality that we are vulnerable,” Cuomo said.

On Monday night, as Sandy’s storm surge hit, salt water rushed into all five subway tunnels linking Manhattan with Brooklyn.

More people ride through those tunnels then ride through every other transit system in America. MTA Chief Joe Lhota described the scene the next day. “The MTA faced a disaster as devastating as it has ever faced in its history.”

The MTA had been aware of the danger.

About a year ago I spoke to Columbia University’s Klaus Jacobs. He modeled a storm like Sandy and brought his findings to the MTA. “And there was a big silence in the room,” Jacob said. “Because the system is so old. Many of the items that would be damaged by the intrusion of the saltwater into the system could not recover quickly.”

That’s a prediction that came eerily close to reality. Without power, pumping out the tunnels is slow. MTA officials need to dry out the parts, and then check each one of them before fully opening the subway.

More than a year ago, Jacobs produced a subway with the flooded lines colored in deep blue, looking like skeletal fingers under the East River. Last night, the MTA released its own map of the new subway. The closed lines almost exactly reflect Jacob’s model.

By Thursday none of the five flooded tunnels under the East River had reopened, though Lhota said two were within hours of operation if power could be restored.  In the subway, announcers intoned: “Ladies and Gentlemen, there is no train service between Brooklyn and Manhattan.”

Officials set up shuttle buses to replace the subways, but the transfers were choked. A line at Brooklyn’s brand new basketball arena, Barclays Center, stretched fully around the arena – the same day the Arena was to host the Nets v. the Knicks season opener.

Damage to the MTA New York City Transit system in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy

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Transportation Nation

Lhota: Give Us Electricity, We'll Give You F, and 2/3 Subways in Two Hours

Thursday, November 01, 2012

MTA Chair Joe Lhota said subway trains can run between Manhattan and Brooklyn soon after power is restored

In a press briefing with Governor Cuomo, the transit chief said two of the tunnels that were flooded by Hurricane Sandy will be ready to go.

"As soon as we get power on the [in the 4/5 tunnel] we will be able to run service through the Rast Tiver into Manhattan and connect the 4 and 5 trains all the way up to the Bronx." The same goes for the F train he said.   The tunnel is ready to go. The same applies to most track south of 34th street in Manhattan.

Lhota said service could be up and running on closed stretches of track as quickly as two hours after power is restored. "We can't do it without electricity."

Other transit is coming back on line as well. You can always find the latest information in our Transit Tracker.

 

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Transportation Nation

NYC Transit: What's Running Friday Morning, MTA Subway, Buses, LIRR, Metro North and Long Island Rail Road

Thursday, November 01, 2012

You can always find the latest information in our Transit Tracker. But we thought it might be helpful to give you the rundown in a post as well. Here ya go.

As of late Thursday evening, here's the summary what's just come back on line from the MTA and then from NJ Transit:

 

The following restorations will be in effect for tomorrow’s commute:

Long Island Rail Road:

· Babylon Branch: Hourly service to Penn Station
· Huntington Branch: Hourly service to Penn Station

Metro-North Railroad:

· Hudson Line: Service between Croton-Harmon and Grand Central Terminal on the Hudson Line will operate on a regular weekday schedule.
· New Haven Line: Service will resume between New Haven and Stamford/Grand Central Terminal by midday.
· Harlem Line: Full service between Southeast and Grand Central Terminal will be restored tomorrow morning.

New York City Transit:

· #7 Service between Flushing Main Street and 74th St. in Queens, will begin by midnight tonight.
· In addition, Limited M service from Jamaica Center along Queens Boulevard, through the 63rd St. tunnel to 34th Street/Herald Square inManhattan, began this afternoon.

Other Public Transportation Restorations Updates:

Long Island Rail Road

· LIRR has been running hourly service fromJamaica to Atlantic Terminal, hourly service fromJamaica to Penn Station, hourly service fromRonkonkoma to Penn Station, and hourly service from Great Neck to Penn Station.

Metro-North Railroad

· Service on the Harlem Line was extended fromMountKisco through to Southeast Station, beginning this afternoon. Trains operated on a very limited schedule this afternoon.

New York City Transit

· More extensive restoration of normal service depends upon Con Edison’s restoration of feeds for Joralemon and Rutgers tubes, plus networks from those tubes up to 36th St. This would enable the New York City Transit to restore service on the 4, 5 and F lines, as well as to re-establish some service over the Manhattan and Williamsburg bridges. Restoration of these feeds would allow for robust Sixth Avenue service. Once power is restored, since the tracks are dry and signal testing has been completed done, the only thing that would remain would be to run a few test trains. Service could be restored within two hours. In addition, NYCT was prepared to establish a #5 shuttle train between Dyre Avenue and East 180th Street in theBronx, but is unable to do so because there is no station power.

MTA Bus Company/NYCT Bus

· Buses operated near normal service this morning with routes diverted as conditions required. In addition to weekday school closed requirements, buses operated the Atlantic, Jay Street and Hewes Street subway replacement shuttles and augmented M5 and M20 service in Manhattan where displaced subway customers were riding.
· Bus service will be curtailed at dusk in the areas of the city where power is still out as was done yesterday, for the safety of pedestrians and passengers. The Brooklyn bus bridge will continue to run past midnight.
· Access-A-Ride began fulfilling scheduled appointments as of noon today. Thirteen of the 14 carriers are providing vehicles to assist in the evacuation effort.
· Bus service will continue to operate the same service levels, as will the subway support service. Normal routes will be restored as soon as conditions allow, including routes supporting the Staten Island Ferry when ferry service resumes.

 

NJ TRANSIT is advising customers of the following:

Rail Service:

  • Northeast Corridor:  On Friday, November 2, service will resume between Trenton Transit Center and Newark Penn Station, operating on a special schedule.
  • North Jersey Coast Line:  On Friday, November 2, service will resume between Woodbridge and Newark Penn Station, operating on a special schedule.  Rail service between Bay Head and Woodbridge remains suspended. An assessment of rail infrastructure has revealed significant damage across the system, including:
    • Morgan Drawbridge in South Amboy sustained damage from boats and a trailer that collided into the bridge. 
    • There are wires and trees down, as well as rail washouts (no ballast under the tracks), between South Amboy and Bay Head.
  • Raritan Valley Line:  On Friday, November 2, service will resume between Raritan and Newark Penn Station only, operating on a special schedule.  Rail service between High Bridge and Raritan remains suspended.
  • Morris & Essex, Montclair-Boonton, Main/Bergen and Atlantic City Rail lines:  Service remains suspended.   An assessment of rail infrastructure has revealed significant damage across the system, including:
    • There is major damage due to downed trees between Summit and Millburn, as well as in Denville and Morristown.  There is also overhead wire damage, including signal wires, with support poles down in Lyons and Bernardsville.  In addition, rail washouts (no ballast under the tracks) occurred at Kearny Junction, where Midtown Direct service connects to the Northeast Corridor. Rail washouts also occurred at several tracks in Hoboken Terminal and at Netcong Station.
    • Elsewhere on the rail system, local power outages have prevented NJ TRANSIT rail operations from being able to further test crossing gates and operating signals.  In addition, hundreds of downed trees have fallen across the rail system, which have caused damage to overhead wires and signal wires.  Several rail stations have sustained flood damage, including Hoboken Terminal.

 

Bus Service:

  • Bus service is operating on 68 bus routes in northern New Jersey and 18 bus routes in southern New Jersey, providing service over the entire routes with no detours or truncations.   For a complete list, visit njtransit.com.
  • Partial service is operating on 58 bus routes in northern New Jersey and 17 routes in southern New Jersey, with detours or truncations due to ongoing impacts from Hurricane Sandy.  For details, visit njtransit.com
  • Bus service on routes not listed remains suspended until further notice.  Power outages in local communities have resulted in the loss of traffic control devices critical to safe operation in some areas.  Downed tree limbs and power lines continue to make many roads impassable.  Personnel are in the field reviewing and assessing these conditions in order to ensure that service is restored as soon as it becomes safe to do so. 

 

Light Rail Service:

  • River Line is operating on a Sunday schedule between Trenton Transit Center and the Entertainment Center in Camden.
  • Hudson-Bergen Light Rail and Newark Light Rail service will remain suspended until further notice.  There is currently no estimated time for resumption of service.   An assessment of rail infrastructure has revealed significant damage across the system, including:
    • Newark Light Rail sustained flooding in Newark Penn Station, as well as major debris damage between Newark Penn and Branch Brook Park stations.
    • Hudson-Bergen Light Rail experienced track washouts at Port Imperial and West Side Avenue stations, as well as trees in the overhead wire in Weehawken and flooding in Hoboken.


Access Link:

  • Access Link service is operating in the following regions:
    • Region 2, which includes Burlington, Camden, Cumberland, Gloucester and Salem counties.
    • Region 3, which includes Atlantic, Cape May and Southern Ocean County.

 

Monthly Pass Extension:

 

NJ TRANSIT has extending the validity period for October monthly passes until Wednesday, November 7 for customer convenience.

 

Service Updates:

 

For the latest travel information, customers should listen to broadcast traffic reports, visit or access NJ TRANSIT’s Twitter feed at @NJ_TRANSIT. Additionally, NJ TRANSIT will provide the most current service information via the My Transit alert system (www.njtransit.com/mytransit), which delivers travel advisories for your specific trip to your cell phone, PDA or pager. Service information is also available by calling (973) 275-5555.

 

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Schoolbook

DOE Presses Ahead With School Openings

Thursday, November 01, 2012

Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott said the Department of Education will be working all weekend to repair school buildings and communicate with school staff at those schools too damaged to re-open on Monday. He also said the specialized high school and SAT tests scheduled for this weekend have been postponed for two weeks.

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WNYC News

Back to Business, But With Limited Deliveries Downtown

Thursday, November 01, 2012

Three days after Sandy's wrath, restaurants and groceries with power in New York City are now getting back to normal. Delivery trucks are back on the roads and customers are back in the aisles. But not in downtown Manhattan, which is still waiting for its electricity to be restored. Con Ed says that should happen this weekend. But just how is the city's food supply holding up?

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Radio Rookies

Remaining in the Flood Zone, Despite the Warnings

Thursday, November 01, 2012

Staten Island was one of the areas hit hard by massive flooding from Sandy. Among the people that stayed, was the family of 17-year-old Tasina Berkey, a current Radio Rookie. Her family, like many of their neighbors, never experienced flooding like this before.

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WNYC News

Power, Transit Problems Drive Lines at the Pumps

Thursday, November 01, 2012

Around the metropolitan area, drivers are lining up at gas stations for hours on end to fill up. More people are traveling by car because of limited mass transit and many are buying gas to fuel generators after losing power. 

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WNYC News

Coping in the Dark, Long Islanders Learn to Live With Less Power

Thursday, November 01, 2012

Long Islanders are finding ways to do more than less, as a whopping 646,512 customers remain without power island-wide. It’s been tough, but they’re finding ways to cope, as the latest estimates from the Long Island Power Authority are likely to leave them in the dark for seven to ten days.

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WQXR Blog

Sandy Washes Classical Label Out of New Offices

Thursday, November 01, 2012

Superstorm Sandy has badly hobbled New Amsterdam – a nonprofit label home to a younger generation of composers and performers – destroying much of its CD inventory and equipment.

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: Why Bloomberg's Obama Endorsement is a Vote for Competence, Compassion

Thursday, November 01, 2012

Mayor Bloomberg's last-minute announcement of support for President Obama is an endorsement of competent governance.

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Schoolbook

Damaged Schools Dry Out, Clean Up From Storm

Thursday, November 01, 2012

Clean-up crews are working around the clock to get schools ready to re-open on Monday. It is still unclear what will happen to the school communities hardest hit by the storm. SchoolBook is working on getting the answers to all of your questions.

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The Takeaway

Will Hurricane Sandy Change Your Vote?

Thursday, November 01, 2012

With much of the hurricane damage in the country’s largest media market, the plight of New Yorkers is sure to dominate the news cycle for weeks — if not months. But could the effects of the hurricane extend beyond the flood zones and power grids?  Could it decide a presidency?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Update on Red Hook

Thursday, November 01, 2012

Jade Elias, Director of Programs at the Red Hook Initiative, talks about how the storm has affected the Red Hook neighborhood and how residents are faring.

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The Takeaway

Pumping Out the Water that Hurricane Sandy Pumped In

Thursday, November 01, 2012

One of the daunting tasks after Hurricane Sandy is how to drain out all the floodwaters caused by the massive storm. Chris Gardner, with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in New York, has been pumping water out from the subway system and transportation in New York City.

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The Takeaway

Hurricane Sandy Brings Long Lines at Gas Stations

Thursday, November 01, 2012

One of the problems facing people affected by Hurricane Sandy is transportation. That includes access to gasoline, of course, which has become more important because many subways, trains, and buses are still well below capacity. Jack Hohman works at Us Gas in Union, New Jersey. He's been dealing with shortages ...

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The Takeaway

Voting in a Disaster Area

Thursday, November 01, 2012

While Sandy’s main impacts have been felt on roads, in homes, and in communities, they also have the potential of being felt at the voting booth. In the storm's aftermath, will all the displaced people be able to make it to the polls? Will the absentee ballots be delivered? And in places that rely on electronic voting machines, will voting even be possible? Scott Colabella, the county clerk for Ocean County, New Jersey, explains.

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