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Hurricane Sandy

New Jersey News

Utilities Restore Power After Sandy, but Ratepayers Will Pick Up the Bill

Monday, November 05, 2012

When the state’s utilities are finished restoring power to millions of customers in the wake of Sandy, the final bill will be passed on to ratepayers, who already face more than a quarter of billion dollars in increases from last year's two powerful storms.

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New Jersey News

After Sandy, NJ's Homeless Population at Greater Risk

Monday, November 05, 2012

The devastation wrought by Hurricane Sandy as it roared through New Jersey last week was impossible to miss: multimillion-dollar homes collapsed like a house of cards, boats berthed on NJ Transit train tracks, much of the Jersey shore reduced to rubble. But the massive storm also did its share of silent — though no less traumatic — damage.

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New Jersey News

After Sandy, Residents Say the Jersey Shore Can Come Back

Monday, November 05, 2012

Sandy has taken an enormous toll on communities up and down the Jersey Shore, destroying homes and businesses, tearing up boardwalks and eroding beaches.  As people try to get back to normal, there’s a growing sense that it will be a new normal, at least of some areas of the shore.

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WNYC News

Public Housing Residents Still in Despair After Sandy

Monday, November 05, 2012

Large parts of the East Village appear to be back to normal with cafes open and young people back on the streets.  But at a public housing development on Avenue C, the desperation was palpable.

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WNYC News

Dispatch | Delivering Aid to Those Hardest Hit

Sunday, November 04, 2012

On the fourth floor of 2727 Surf Avenue, a dapper man in his 70s tried to retain a sense of normalcy. He answered the door wearing a matching vest and tie, his gray hair smoothed neatly back. The living room was a reflection of its occupant: neat and tidy.

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Transportation Nation

Line By Line: Here's What's Running For Monday's Commute: MTA Subways, Buses, LIRR, Metro North, NJ Transit

Sunday, November 04, 2012

The MTA says more than 80 percent of the subway network has been restored, but "it will carry less than 80 percent of normal capacity" on Monday.  Governor Cuomo, Mayor Bloomberg and transit officials are all warning customers to expect delays and crowding during the morning commute.

Jerome Hauer, NYS Commissioner of Homeland Security and Emergency Services, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo and MTA Chairman Joseph J. Lhota discuss the response to Hurricane Sandy before a press conference at the Jacob Javits Center

Jerome Hauer, NYS Commissioner of Homeland Security and Emergency Services, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo and MTA Chairman Joseph J. Lhota discuss the response to Hurricane Sandy before a press conference at the Jacob Javits Center, Sunday, Nov. 4. (Photo: MTA/Adam Lisberg)

The numbered trains are in the best shape -- service on the 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 lines is running normally, with few delays and problems this weekend.  The 1 train is the exception in Manhattan -- service was slowly being restored south of 14th Street Monday morning.  On Sunday, Gov. Cuomo announced that “the South Ferry station, which at one time was a large fish tank, has been pumped dry.”

Riders on the C, G and L trains will likely have the hardest time this week -- the MTA is not releasing an estimate for when problems on those lines will be resolved.

Here is a map of subway service, as it stands now.  More information below:

The L train from Brooklyn to Manhattan and G train from Brooklyn to Queens are unlikely to be carrying passengers early this week.  MTA Chairman Joe Lhota said the flooding in the L tunnel was "of particular concern" and was "hopeful" for restoration this week.  Service on both lines is suspended with no estimated time for resuming service.  From Williamsburg and Bushwick to Manhattan, the best alternative to the L is the J and the M, which were restored Sunday.  The L is running in Queens, between Broadway Junction and Rockaway Parkway.

N, Q and R trains: There is no service in Manhattan south of 34 Street.  A temporary ferry service may fill in gaps for some rush hour commuters between the Brooklyn Army Terminal in Sunset Park, Brooklyn and Wall Street/Pier 11 and East 35th Street.  Here's schedule and fare information.  The Q began running again on Sunday and is now restored from Kings Highway in Brooklyn to Ditmars in Astoria over the Manhattan Bridge.

B, D, F and M trains: The F will be ready for the morning commute.  It returned to full service Sunday, with the exception of Coney Island at the end of the line in Brooklyn, where trains stop at Avenue X, instead of Stillwell Avenue.  D trains are also running normally, with the exception of Coney Island -- the last stop in Brooklyn is Bay Parkway.  Riders on the M train can get into Manhattan from Queens, but trains were not going south of 34th Street Sunday.  B train service remains suspended.

A train: in Manhattan, there is no service on this line below 34th Street and above 168th Street, to Inwood.  Service picks back up in Queens, where passengers in Ozone Park can get on at Lefferts Boulevard and ride to Jay Street/MetroTech.  There is no service to JFK or the Rockaways through Howard Beach.  In the Rockaways, the A train remains suspended because of "extensive damage" around Broad Channel.  The MTA hopes to restore limited train shuttle service from Beach 116 Street to Mott Avenue with trains they bring back onto the Rockaway Peninsula by truck.  Passengers would still have only a shuttle buses to get them from the Rockaways to the Howard Beach station, once service is restored there.  Today, the MTA said "no timetable has yet been established for this service."

C and E trains: Service was restored late Sunday night on both lines through Queens, Manhattan and Brooklyn.

J and Z trains: J trains will run between Jamaica Center and Essex Street, but had some signal problems Sunday.  Z trains remain suspended.

Franklin Avenue Shuttle: restored

NJ TRANSIT

NJ Transit will only be able to operate 13 trains into New York during the peak period tomorrow morning -- normal level would be 63.  "Emergency Bus Service" will run in Hoboken, Weehawken, Jersey City and Manhattan Monday.  Gov. Christie says the temporary move aims to "provide approximately 50% of NJ TRANSIT’s normal rail rush hour service."  Routes will end at ferries, light rail and shopping areas.  Here's pickup, dropoff, schedule and route information.

One piece of good news for riders with monthly passes: NJ Transit announced that it will honor October monthly passes until Friday.

NJ Transit says 90 percent of its bus service is now operating again.  The largest obstacle for remaining lines are power outages, which have left traffic lights out and led drivers to declare the routes unsafe.

Here's the latest, line-by-line from NJ Transit on Sunday evening:

Montclair-Boonton Line: service remains suspended, with a bleak outlook.  Overhead wires, especially on the Montclair Branch, suffered heavy damage in the storm.  Flooding in Kearny has caused also rail washouts, making rail traffic impassable.

Morris & Essex Line:  service remains suspended, with a bleak outlook.  Summit, Milburn, Denville and Morristown took big hits to overhead wires.  The flooding in Kearny is also affecting service here.

North Jersey Coast Line: service resumed Sunday between Woodbridge and Penn Station New York, currently on a modified schedule.

Raritan Valley Line: service resumed Sunday between Raritan and Newark Penn Station.  On Monday, it will also follow a modified schedule.  Rail service between High Bridge and Raritan remains suspended.

Northeast Corridor Line: service between Trenton Transit Center and Penn Station New York on a modified schedule.

Main/Port Jervis Line: service resumed Sunday between Port Jervis and Secaucus Junction, currently on a modified schedule.

Pascack Valley & Bergen Line: service remains suspended, due mostly to power outages affecting signals, switches and crossing gates.  As power comes back on, these lines are expected to run again quickly.

PATH

All PATH service remains suspended due to damage to signal, control and substation equipment in multiple stations.

METRO NORTH

Metro North trains are running from Poughkeepsie on the Hudson Line, Southeast on the Harlem Line and New Haven on the New Haven Line.

Monday, Metro-North will resume regular service on the Wassaic Branch of the Harlem Line.  Service will also resume from Waterbury and Danbury in Connecticut.  The New Canaan Branch will be served by buses

West of the Hudson, The Port Jervis Line is running trains between Port Jervis and Secaucus Junction, but there is no service to or from Hoboken

The Newburgh-Beacon Ferry and the Haverstraw-Ossining Ferry will return to service Monday morning, but service remains suspended on the Pascack Valley Line.

LIRR

Sunday night, the Long Island Railroad said travelers should expect 10-15 minute delays systemwide during Monday morning's commute.

Trains will operate on a modified schedule Monday on all branches except the Long Beach Line. The Ronkokoma Line will not run east of Ronkonkoma, and the Montauk Branch won't be running east of Speonk.

The October monthly ticket will be valid for travel on Monday, November 5.

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Transportation Nation

The Official NY Area Transit Tracker

Sunday, November 04, 2012

Hurricane Sandy wrought havoc on all area transportation, closing bridges, flooding tunnels and drowning the NYC subway system. We will stay on top of the damage and the schedules for resumption of service. Check back regularly. We'll also tweet any openings, so follow us on Twitter to know when we update the Tracker below.

MTA Metro-North Railroad employees using a crane to remove a boat that had washed up on the tracks at Ossining. (Photo courtesy of MTA)

WE WILL UPDATE THIS POST THROUGHOUT THE RECOVERY

Sign up for our daily email to get a digest of all our reporting on Hurricane Sandy transportation impacts and recovery.

 

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Transportation Nation

Cuomo: Subway Service "Will Not Be Normal" Monday

Sunday, November 04, 2012

We're watching what more comes online today as the MTA and other agencies push to open resources or the Monday morning commute.  But Governor Cuomo is already warning that it will be another difficult day for getting around the region.

At a news briefing this morning with federal, state and local disaster officials, Cuomo listed the status of bus and subway lines citywide, but added, "service will not be normal tomorrow and we need you to understand that before you enter the system."

"The volume is going to be way up tomorrow.  The schools will be open.  And because of the gas problem, you'll have many more people on mass transit," Cuomo said.

"We are on uncharted territory here in terms of restoring the system," MTA Chief Joe Lhota added, noting that subways would not be running as frequently as straphangers are used to during the morning rush.  Lhota also noted that the South Ferry subway station, which he had described as being under water "up to the ceiling" on Tuesday, is now free of water.   But he said that the effects of saltwater on the system are still being tallied.

Mayor Bloomberg, for his part, said he planned to take the train to work Monday.

Both Cuomo and Senator Charles Schumer urged patience on the gas front.  "The Department of Defense is filling in the gaps as parts of the free market gas delivery system are in fragments," Schumer said at the briefing.  Schumer added that his wife, Iris Weinshall, the former NYC Department of Transportation commissioner, waited on a gas line for two and a half hours yesterday, and wanted to know what he was doing about it. "So I'm telling her, as well as all of you," Schumer said, adding that consumers should expect improvements each day.

Cuomo also added that the MTA would be bringing in subway cars by flat bed truck to restore subway service to the Rockaways.  The Rockaways bridge is still out, but Cuomo said there would be a bus shuttle.

The officials urged motorists to curtail unnecessary driving.

For it's part, the New York City Taxi and Limousine commission said, as of Saturday night, 80 percent of the taxi fleet was operating.

Today, NJ Transit added service back on four lines, some with limited schedules.  The Main/Port Jervis Line added limited service, with trains to and from Secaucus.  The Raritan Valley Line resumed limited service between Raritan and Newark Penn Station.  The North Jersey Coast Line began limited service between Woodbridge and New York Penn Station.

We'll be updating all changes to the transportation infrastructure here:

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Transportation Nation

Sunday Subway Updates: 2 and 3 Trains Run Under River, D Trains Begin Limited Service

Sunday, November 04, 2012

2:30PM UPDATE: The MTA says it is "now working to resume Q train service from Astoria in Queens to Brighton Beach in Brooklyn, M train service from Queens to Brooklyn and A train service from 168 St. in Manhattan to Lefferts Blvd. in Queens.

The L train from Brooklyn to Manhattan and the G train from Brooklyn to Queens remain suspended with no estimated time for resuming service."

At an afternoon news conference, Mayor Bloomberg said, "city, state and federal workers are continuing to pump out the Hugh Carey Tunnel/Brooklyn Battery Tunnel, the Queens Midtown Tunnel as well as the Montague Tunnel that carries the N and R trains."

Trains are now getting between Brooklyn and Manhattan via two tunnels and two bridges, as the MTA adds service on more lines across the East River.

2 train service now runs from 241 Street in the Bronx to Flatbush Avenue in Brooklyn and 3 train service has resumed from 148th Street to New Lots Ave.

Tunnels and stations for 1, 2 and 3 trains were the hardest hit on the New York City transit system.  The restoration of service has come after millions of gallons of water have been removed.  This morning, Gov. Cuomo announced that "the South Ferry station, which at one time was a large fish tank, has been pumped dry."

Still, that station remained closed Sunday and 1 train service stops at 14th Street in Manhattan.  Cuomo said he expected more stations opened farther south today.

The D and J trains are now running over the Manahattan and Williamsburg bridges.  The MTA says D service will be limited for now, but it runs from 205th Street in the Bronx to Bay Parkway in Brooklyn.

Today, the F train is running in two sections.  In Manhattan and Queens, it makes local stops between 179 St to 34 St.  In Brooklyn, a second arm of service runs between Avenue X and Jay Street.  MTA shuttle buses can take passengers from Jay Street to 34th Street in Manhattan.

Here is updated information on the rest of the transit systems and roadways:

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New Jersey News

Essay | Sandy Helps Make Neighbors Family

Sunday, November 04, 2012

Adam Wade, 37, has been living in Hoboken, N.J., for the last nine years. During the last two years, he’s had the top floor of a 3-story brownstone. He’s grown close to the occupants of the two other floors, and Sandy just helped solidify those bonds.

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Transportation Nation

NYC Subways Run Under East River for First Time Since Storm, System 80% Operational

Saturday, November 03, 2012

New York City Transit employees are pumping water out of the Cranberry Street Tunnel, which carries the A and C trains between Brooklyn and Manhattan underneath the East River, Nov. 03, 2012 (Photo: MTA New York City Transit / Leonard Wiggins)

Remember you can always find the very latest information on what is running and what isn't at our Transit Tracker.

This just in from the MTA and the NY Governor's office:

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) has restored 80 percent of the New York subway system including subway service between Brooklyn and Manhattan, restoring a vital transit link that was severed by Hurricane Sandy.

The 4, 5, 6 and 7 trains are fully restored. The Staten Island Railway will resume service hourly today, move to half hourly service later today, and will be fully restored in time for the Monday morning rush.

The F, J, D and M will be fully functional by later this morning.

"This is a major step forward in the resumption of regular subway service in New York City," Governor Cuomo said. "Once again, subway customers have a direct link between Brooklyn and Manhattan, giving them a fast and reliable way to get to their jobs, their schools and their homes."

The resumption of service is made possible by Con Edison's continued work to restore power to darkened sections of lower Manhattan. Engineers from the MTA and Con Edison worked together to plan an orderly restoration of power so the subway system would have an adequate supply of electricity without destabilizing the network.

"We have worked closely with Con Edison to bring back the subways as soon as possible without jeopardizing the progress they have made in restoring Manhattan's electric grid," said MTA Chairman and CEO Joseph J. Lhota. "Our dedicated workers are continuing to pump water, test signals and bring back more of the subway network that 5.5 million customers depend on each day."

Governor Cuomo also announced that the MTA will be able to restore limited service on the Staten Island Railway as soon as Con Edison is able to supply power. The railway will initially run trains hourly.

Governor Cuomo earlier announced the MTA Metro-North Railroad would resume full train service Saturday morning on the Hudson Line from Poughkeepsie to Grand Central Terminal, completing the restoration of all main lines east of the Hudson River.

Additionally, a tweet from the MTA said the A train will be ready for the Monday morning rush.

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WNYC News

Teachers, Students and Evacuees Co-Exist as Schools Set to Resume

Saturday, November 03, 2012

Teachers were back in school Friday, preparing for Monday’s reopening.  But eight public schools are still doing double duty as shelters for those displaced by flooding from Sandy. At Brooklyn Tech, the borough's most sought after public high school, students will share their building with the elderly and people with mental and physical disabilities. Some are apprehensive.

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WNYC News

WTC Site Floods, But Officials Say Buildings Will Be Hurricane-Proof

Saturday, November 03, 2012

Millions of gallons of water streamed into the World Trade Center site during Sandy, cascading through the PATH terminal and down ramps used for construction vehicles. But officials say the prognosis for flooding, and any other hurricane damage, should be much better once the 16-acre redevelopment is complete.

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WNYC News

As Queens Remains in the Dark, Panic and Fear Grow

Friday, November 02, 2012

Power has been restored to parts of Manhattan, but in Far Rockaway, Queens, it’s cold and dark. The NYPD says its adding extra patrols and lighting after reports of looting, but residents are still anxious and fearful.

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WNYC News

Even as Power is Restored, Some Buildings Remain Dark

Friday, November 02, 2012

For someone without power,  that longed for moment is when the clock radio starts blinking 12:01 or the refrigerator's calming hum returns.

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Transportation Nation

Why Sandy Emergency Aid Is for Roads, Not Subways, Buses: Congress

Friday, November 02, 2012

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood in Newark, hours after workers finished pumping water from the city's light rail line.  (Photo by Anna Sale)

(Anna Sale, Newark, NJ -- WNYC) The federal Department of Transportation announced $12 million in emergency highway funds for Connecticut and New Jersey on Friday. New Jersey gets the bulk: $10 million.

That money will pay for road repair. Ray LaHood, the U.S. Secretary of Transportation, says none of the aid money will pay to fix the stalled transit system in New Jersey, which is coping with washed away track, broken equipment and even a pile of boats stuck on top of a drawbridge. (Slideshow)

"They tried to get an emergency transit fund established, but it hasn't been funded," LaHood said of Democrats in Congress.

New Jersey Senator Robert Menendez supported emergency transit funding in Washington, but says it was blocked by Senate Republicans. He says Sandy’s paralyzing effects on regional transit could alter the politics of transit funding in Washington. “Maybe when we go back and we can make the case, see this is what we were talking about when we were trying to get you to agree. Agree now to give us an appropriation for this amount.”

New Jersey’s two U.S. senators joined Secretary LaHood on a tour of a flooded light rail line at Newark’s Penn Station on Friday. The last water had been pumped from the muddy tracks just hours before, and the extent of the electrical damage was still not clear. New Jersey Transit has not released an estimate or timetable for restoring service, earlier telling Transportation Nation the damage had been "unprecedented" and "crippling."

Secretary LaHood says it will be a busy weekend of repairs, but transit riders may still have to wait to resume their normal routines. “Be patient," he said. "We are doing all we can to make sure that people can be delivered to work on Monday in this region. Not just in New Jersey, but in this region. Whatever requests were received for additional buses, we’ve provided.”

Some of those buses will begin running between New Jersey park-and-ride locations and Hudson River ferries as early as Monday, New Jersey Transit announced. NJ Transit rail service along the Northeast Corridor will began connecting Trenton to New York City late Friday night.

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WNYC News

For One East Villager, A Lesson Learned in the Dark

Friday, November 02, 2012

I was daunted by the task of leaving and also feeling the pull of home and neighbors in need. We stayed as long as we could and I am grateful for the chance to live not just among the “have nots” but to be one. Here is what I gleaned from just a few days of living in the dark zone.

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Schoolbook

More Than 100 Schools Remain Closed Monday

Friday, November 02, 2012

School officials are scrambling to re-route buses and get the word out to parents about the start of school Monday. While most students will return to the classroom on Monday, about 100 schools will not open, including schools in eight buildings that are serving as emergency shelters for people displaced by Sandy.

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WNYC News

Amid Growing Criticism, NYC Marathon is Canceled

Friday, November 02, 2012

The ING New York City Marathon has been canceled amid growing criticism from those who felt the city should focus its efforts on cleanup and rebuilding in the wake of Sandy.

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The Takeaway

New York City Marathon Will Go on as Planned

Friday, November 02, 2012

Even as New York gets back on its feet after the storm, tens of thousands of runners have begun descending on the city to take part in the world’s largest marathon on Sunday. Many runners say the event's economic boost — and spirit of celebration — is just what the city needs. But not everyone agrees. Alicia Feghhi is member of the Clifton Road Runners.  Though she lost power in her home, she was initially still planning to run the marathon -- her first.  Now she says, the race should be canceled. Mary Elizabeth Williams, staff writer for Salon is running the marathon this weekend -- also for the first time.  A cancer survivor, she's trained with and raised money for other cancer patients and their families.  She's saddened by the backlash against the race.

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