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Hungary

PRI's The World

Moscow has a long history of making interesting excuses for its military interventions

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

NATO says a Russian invasion of Ukraine is "highly probable." The Ukrainian government says a large convoy of humanitarian aid coming from Russia is just a "Trojan horse." If the humanitarian crisis is indeed a pretext for an invasion, it certainly wouldn't be Moscow's first time.

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Exploring Music

Magnificent Magyars

Monday, February 03, 2014

Host Bill McGlaughlin delves into the rich musical history of Hungary, starting with ancient sacred music and working his way through Liszt, Kodaly, Bartók and Hungarian gypsy music.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Love and Separation in WWII Hungary

Wednesday, September 04, 2013

Marianne Szegedy-Maszak tells a wartime love story about her parents, Hanna and Aladár, who met and fell in love in Budapest in 1940. He was sent to Dachau, and she and her family were forced into hiding when the Germans invaded Hungary and later fled to Portugal. They were reunited and were at last married in a devastated Budapest.  I Kiss Your Hands Many Times includes her parents letters and tells of the complicated relationship Hungary had with its Jewish population and with the rest of the world.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Ethics and Fashion; Alan Alda and "Brains on Trial"; Love Survived WWII in Hungary; Kirk Johnson's List Project

Wednesday, September 04, 2013

Five months ago, a building collapse in Bangladesh killed more than 1,000 garment workers. We’ll find out how the fashion industry has been changing how overseas workers are treated. Alan Alda and neurologist Bea Luna talk about how developments in neuroscience could change criminal trials. We’ll hear one woman’s story of how her parents’ love survived war and the Holocaust. And Kirk Johnson describes going to Baghdad in 2005 with USAID, his struggles with depression and PTSD, and how he’s now trying to help Iraqis find refuge in the United States.

Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

James Michener Speculates on Soviet Satellites, the U.S., and 'The Bridge at Andau'

Monday, November 19, 2012

WNYC

Hungary's abortive 1956 revolution provides the subject for this talk given by the journalist and novelist James Michener at a 1957 New York Herald Tribune Books and Authors Luncheon. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Guest Picks: László Krasznahorkai

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Celebrated Hungarian writer László Krasznahorkai was on the Lopate Show recently to discuss a new translation of his novel, Satantango. He also told us what he's been reading, listening to and looking at.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

László Krasznahorkai on Satantango

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Hungarian writer László Krasznahorkai discusses his novel Satantango. It’s set in desolate Hungarian town, and when a charismatic man named Irimias returns, the villagers fall under his spell.

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Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: The Power of Love

Sunday, May 27, 2012

Two gripping short tales about the power of love.

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New Sounds

New Music from Hungary

Saturday, May 19, 2012

Hear works by Hungarian composers and musicians on this New Sounds, including Istvan Marta, György Ligeti, and the Amadinda Percussion Group.  Amadinda happens to be the first professional percussion group in Hungary and has had a number of works commissioned for them, including one by Hungarian composer Istvan Marta.  Marta, has been called a bit of a minimalist who works in folkloric Hungarian and Transylvanian touches, sometimes even field recordings.

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Classics For Kids

Hungarian Dancing

Saturday, April 14, 2012

The Hungarian Dances by Johannes Brahms were never really intended for dancing.  But that doesn't mean that people in Hungary don't dance!  Richard Graber, the director of a Hungarian dance company in Cleveland, talks with Naomi Lewin about Hungarian dancing.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Hungary's New Constitution

Thursday, January 05, 2012

Over the last few weeks, thousands of Hungarians have been in the streets, protesting the government’s changes to the country’s constitution. On today’s second Backstory, journalist Adam LeBor joins us from Budapest to discuss why the new constitution has raised concerns within Hungary and around the world, and why the changes could affect the country’s access to economic aid from the IMF and the EU.

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The Takeaway

Controversial Changes and Protest in Hungary

Thursday, January 05, 2012

It's been a controversial start to the new year in Hungary. The turn of the year meant changes to the country's constitution, changes that some say are incompatible with Hungary's membership in the European Union. Tens of thousands of people are protesting the new constitution, and the EU is contemplating sanctions against Budapest. BBC correspondent Nick Thorpe reports.

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New Sounds

New Music from Hungary

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Hear works by Hungarian composers and musicians on this New Sounds, including Istvan Marta, György Ligeti, and the Amadinda Percussion Group.  Amadinda happens to be the first professional percussion group in Hungary and has had a number of works commissioned for them, including one by Hungarian composer Istvan Marta.  Marta, has been called a bit of a minimalist who works in folkloric Hungarian and Transylvanian touches, sometimes even field recordings. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Update: Post-Communist Hungary

Thursday, January 06, 2011

Adam LeBor, Budapest correspondent for the London Times and the Economist magazine, gives us an update on the political situation in Hungary, including a new law passed by parliament that gives the government tighter control over the media.

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Selected Shorts

The Power of Love

Sunday, November 28, 2010

This week's episode features “Love” by Tibor Dery, performed by Keir Dullea and “Silver Water” by Amy Bloom, performed by Linda Lavin.

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The Takeaway

Fears of Second Toxic Sludge Spill in Hungary

Monday, October 11, 2010

A week after 35 million cubic feet of toxic sludge leaked out of an alumina plant reservoir in Ajka, Hungary killing seven people and creating one of the worst environmental disaster in European history, there are new fears this morning of another catastrophe. Four thousand workers and 300 machines are rushing to complete an emergency dam to prevent a second incident after new cracks were discovered in the reservoir's retaining wall.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Hungarian Sludge Spill

Thursday, October 07, 2010

The toxic spill of red sludge from an alumina plant has finally reached the Danube River. On today’s Backstory segment, we’ll look into the messy method of producing aluminum and what can be done with all the so-called “red mud” that’s created in the process. We’ll speak with Dr. William Cary, a professor of ceramic engineering at Alfred University, Dr. Lex Van Geen, a geochemist at Columbia’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, and Gabor Figeczky, acting director of the World Wildlife Fund in Hungary.

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WQXR News

Hungary Tries to Stop Flow of Toxic Waste

Thursday, October 07, 2010

The Associated Press reports that toxic waste that spilled from a reservoir at a Hungarian refining plant about 100 miles southwest of Budapest on Monday has made its way to the Danube River, and authorities are carefully testing water samples to determine whether the waste could be carried to other countries.

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The Takeaway

Toxic Sludge Devastates Hungary

Wednesday, October 06, 2010

An estimated 185 million gallons of toxic sludge spewed out of a break in a reservoir at an alumina refining plant in Ajka, Hungary, leaving a path of destruction and havoc in its wake. At least four people were reported dead and 120 injured as the Hungarian government declared a state of emergency in the area. Though the European Union does not classify the sludge as toxic waste, people who came into contact with the caustic substance describe being burned through their clothing. Officials are worried about the environmental impact of the flood, especially should the sludge come into contact with the Danube River. Julian Siddle of the BBC has been following the story and joins the program with the latest.

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