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Humanitarian Aid

The Takeaway

Can The U.S. Help Iraq Save Itself?

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Thousands of Kurdish Yezidis remain trapped atop Mount Sinjar, and on Sunday evening, Britain's Royal Air Force was forced to abort an aid drop amid fears that the thousands below could be injured. Here, The Takeaway examines what it takes to make humanitarian missions successful.

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The Takeaway

Rwanda Still Healing 20 Years After Genocide

Monday, April 07, 2014

Commemoration ceremonies have begun in Rwanda 20 years after genocide ripped through the country. The healing, in many ways, has still just begun. What does a nation on its way to healing look like?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Decade In and Out of Humanitarian Aid

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Jessica Alexander talks about life as a foreign aid worker. She arrived in Rwanda in the aftermath of the 1994 genocide as an idealistic intern, but the experience in the field was messy, chaotic, and difficult—but she was hooked. Her memoir Chasing Chaos: My Decade In and Out of Humanitarian Aid traces her personal journey from naïve newcomer to critical realist.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

“Fatal Assistance” and Post-Earthquake Haiti

Thursday, June 20, 2013

Award-winning Haitian-born filmmaker Raoul Peck discusses the challenging, colossal rebuilding efforts in post-earthquake Haiti. His film “Fatal Assistance” is an indictment of the international community’s post-disaster idealism and looks at the complexity of the reconstruction process, the impact of worldwide humanitarian and development aid, and reveals the failures. “Fatal Assistance” is playing at Film Society of Lincoln Center's Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center June 19, at 6:30, and at IFC Center June 20, at 7:00 pm, as part of the Human Rights Watch Film Festival.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Doctors Without Borders and Humanitarian Negotiations

Tuesday, January 31, 2012

Michael Neuman explores the practical realities of conducting humanitarian negotiations in complex situations. He’s the editor of Humanitarian Negotiations Revealed: The MSF Experience, published on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), which addresses the evolution of humanitarian goals, the resistance to these goals, and the political arrangements that overcame (or failed to) this resistance.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Marine's Path to Peace

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Rye Barcott talks about being both a Marine and a humanitarian. He started Carolina for Kibera (CFK), a non-governmental organization focused on developing a new generation of leaders from within Kibera, one of Africa's largest slums, in Nairobi, Kenya. In It Happened On the Way to War: A Marine's Path to Peace, he gives an account of his experience in the Marines, serving as a human intelligence officer in Iraq, Bosnia, and the Horn of Africa, as well as his work in humanitarian service.

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The Takeaway

Twenty Years Later, Somalia's Grave State Continues

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

John Hockenberry went to Somalia in 1992. Hunger, armed Islamists, and drought were taking a heavy toll on the country — just like they are now. In his latest video, Hockenberry talks about the experience, and how news of famine and difficult challenges to delivery of aid in recent weeks sounds far too familiar in a country still desperate for help, and plagued by those who undermine it. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Third Wave: A Volunteer Story

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Filmmaker Alison Thompson describes her journey as a volunteer—from her first real introduction to disaster relief after 9/11 to her efforts in Haiti, where she helped create and run, with Sean Penn, a displaced-person camp and field hospital for more than 65,000 Haitians who lost their homes in the 2010 earthquake. In The Third Wave: A Volunteer Story, she provides an inside glimpse into what really happens on the ground after a disaster—and a road map for what anyone can do to help.

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The Takeaway

Nicholas Kristof on Africa's Worst Drought in Decades

Friday, July 08, 2011

Nearly 12 million people in Africa are facing the worst drought the continent has seen in 60 years. Along with water shortages, come food shortages — and as people desperate for food become refugees, aid groups are calling for a wide-ranging effort to tackle the problem. New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof joins the show to talk about the challenges facing the region most severely impacted, and the aid groups trying to provide relief.

 

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The Takeaway

United Nations Call For Pause in Libyan Conflict for Humanitarian Aid

Wednesday, May 11, 2011

A United Nations Security Council Resolution sanctioned military intervention in Libya to safeguard civilians from attacks led by Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi. But now reports of cluster bombs, sea and land mines, and deaths from aerial bombing has the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs concerned that the toll on civilians might be too great. The agency has called for a weapons' pause to allow humanitarian supplies and investigators safely into the country.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Heart and the Fist

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

Eric Greitens, a Rhodes Scholar and Navy SEAL, talks about his volunteer and aid work, and his experiences leading US Marines in Iraq, as well as his work with severely wounded and disabled veterans. He shares his story of service as both a humanitarian and a soldier in his memoir The Heart and the Fist.

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