Streams

 

Human Rights

The Brian Lehrer Show

Uncovering Abuses in Abu Dhabi

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Daniel Nardello, the CEO of Nardello & Co., investigated labor practices for NYU's Abu Dhabi campus. He shares what he learned about how workers were treated. 

Comments [10]

The Takeaway

What Our UN Ambassador Sees in Syria's Brutality

Monday, March 23, 2015

We joined Samantha Power, the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, to observe a new art installation that captures the raw horror of the conflict in Syria. Hear her reaction. 

Comments [6]

The Takeaway

Exiled Russian Official Takes a Stand Against Putin

Monday, March 16, 2015

Ilya Ponomarev, a member of the Russian parliament, has been living in exile here in the U.S. because of his opposition to President Putin.

Comments [3]

The Takeaway

Saudi Arabia & America's Blind Eye

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

President Obama arrives in Saudi Arabia today to pay his respects for the deceased King Abdullah. But is the U.S. sending a mixed message to Saudi Arabia on human rights?

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WNYC News

Transgender Women at Rikers Get Separate Housing

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Transgender women entering Rikers Island will be housed in separate facilities, in order to reduce violence.

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The Takeaway

We The People: When Corporations Trump Human Dignity

Tuesday, October 07, 2014

A new case is leading some to question who, under the current Supreme Court, qualifies for human rights and why corporations seem to be more protected than individuals. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Update on Human Rights in Bahrain

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

A journalist talks about Maryam al-Khawaja, the Bahraini human rights activist, detained as she returned to the country to visit her jailed father.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Who Decides What Human Rights Are?

Thursday, August 14, 2014

What are the origins of human rights? In recent years, this question has become a major focus of historical and ideological debate. Law professor Samuel Moyn explores the past, present, and future of the politics of human rights and talks about when humanitarian intervention is justified. He’s the ...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Human Rights, Activism and George Takei

Thursday, August 14, 2014

On today’s show: Legal professor Samuel Moyn looks at the history and politics of human rights and talks about what justifies humanitarian intervention. Actor, activist and social media superstar George Takei discusses his life and career—along with Jennifer Kroot, who’s made a documentary called “To Be Takei.” Five-time Grammy winner Marty Stuart talks about his photographs of legendary musicians, eccentric characters and portraits of members of the Lakota tribe. And we’ll look at the growing militarization of American policing and why some small town sheriffs’ departments have been given heavily armored tanks.

 

The Leonard Lopate Show

China's Secret Organ Transplant Business

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

A China analyst investigates China’s program to get rid of political dissidents while profiting from the sale of their organs--in many cases to Western recipients.

Comments [12]

The Takeaway

Should we Do Deals with Dictators?

Thursday, August 07, 2014

Tutu Alicante is the executive director for EG Justice and and an Equatoguinean living in exile. His home country has one of the worst human rights records on the continent and is ruled by Africa's Longest serving dictator, Teodoro Obiang Nguema. Tutu says that the United States should use the U.S.-Africa Summit to address the human rights abuses occurring in Africa with the same zeal it’s approaching trade and investment opportunities.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Emergency Cinema in Syria

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Andrea Holley, deputy director of the Human Rights Watch Film Festival, and Charif Kiwan, producer and spokesperson for the Abounaddara Collective, discusses short films made by citizen-reporters in Syria.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

“The Supreme Price,” the Abiola Family, and Politics in Nigeria

Thursday, June 19, 2014

The director of the documentary “The Supreme Price,” discusses the film with its subject, Hafsat Abiola, an activist from a political family in Nigeria.

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Parks, Maps, Education, and Human Rights

Thursday, June 19, 2014

On today’s show: Michael S. Roth, the president of Wesleyan University, defends the value of a liberal education in today’s world. We’ll take a look inside the cut-throat business of antiquarian map collecting and a startling criminal case of theft. Find out how Frederick Law Olmsted virtually created the field of landscape architecture. And we’ll talk about some films at the Human Rights Watch Film Festival—a look at the Abiola family and their role in Nigeria’s independence, and a series of documentaries smuggled out of war-torn Syria that reveal the chaos its people are forced to live in.

WNYC News

Activists Call for Investigation of NYPD Surveillance Practices

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

It's only his first week on the job, but political activists are already calling on the new Inspector General for the NYPD to investigate the department's Intelligence Division.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Change and Conflict in Modern-Day China

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

After decades of rapid social and economic change in China, the rise of the individual is clashing with the Communist Party’s struggle to retain control.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Former Iranian Political Prisoner on Human Rights in Iran

Monday, March 31, 2014

Mehdi Arabshahi, was president of the largest student organization in Iran, the Daftar Tahkim Vahdat, and a former political prisoner who fled Iran after being held in solitary confinement for 100 days. He and Gissou Nia, Executive Director of the Iran Human Rights Documentation Center, discuss the status of human rights in Iran. Over the last few years, there have been a significant rise in human rights abuses in Iran with 624 executions in 2013, and over 75 executions since January 1, 2014, and more than 800 human rights defenders imprisoned; figures that are on the rise each and every day. Recently, UN Secretary General’s offered a sharp rebuke of Iran’s President Rouhani for failing to improve human rights in Iran since taking office in August.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Human Rights in Iran; Prison; Poverty and Health

Monday, March 31, 2014

On today’s show: we’ll talk to the former head of Iran’s largest student organization, who fled the country after being held in solitary confinement for 100 days. Filmmaker Timothy Skousen on the program at Sing Sing prison that has allowed inmates to earn a college degree. He’s joined by one of the program’s founders. Our series Strapped: A Look at Poverty in America examines the effects poverty has on health and mental health. And food writer Michael Ruhlman tells us about his new cookbook devoted to eggs.

WNYC News

In NYC, Pussy Riot Target Russian Politics, Prisons

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

The Russian band has formed a human rights group to continue their activism, on the eve of their concert at Brooklyn's Barclays Center.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How Federal Prosecutors Force Drug Defendants to Plead Guilty

Monday, December 16, 2013

Jamie Fellner, senior advisor to the US Program at Human Rights Watch, discusses how federal prosecutors routinely threaten extraordinarily severe prison sentences to coerce drug defendants into waiving their right to trial and pleading guilty. She’s the author of a Human Rights Watch report “An Offer You Can’t Refuse: How US Federal Prosecutors Force Drug Defendants to Plead Guilty.”

Comments [2]