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Human Rights

The Takeaway

New Tech Shines Light on Human Trafficking in Supply Chains

Friday, October 25, 2013

KnowTheChain.org is an online resource that lists which businesses have a policy against human rights abuses in their supply chains. Lori Bishop, director of investments at Humanity United, says its the first step in a long-term strategy to engage businesses in a dialogue about human trafficking. Also on the market: apps that allow consumers to examine a company's ethical practices before making a purchase. Manoush Zomorodi, host of WNYC's New Tech City, joins The Takeaway to discuss these apps.

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The Takeaway

HRW: Hundreds of Civilians Caught in Line of Fire by Syrian Rebels

Friday, October 11, 2013

A new report released today by Human Rights Watch shows that hundreds of civilians have been caught in the line of fire by Syrian Rebels. Armed opposition groups in Syria killed at least 190 civilians and seized over 200 as hostages during a military offensive that began in rural Latakia governorate on August 4, 2013, according to the report. Joining us to discuss this report and what it means for the Syrian civil war is Lara Setrakian, founder of Syria Deeply.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Covering the Conflict and Unspoken Crimes in Syria

Monday, August 12, 2013

Janine di Giovanni discusses covering the conflict in Syria and talks about reports that rape has become an epidemic in Syria and in refugee camps as both sides seek to de-stabilize, frighten, and ruin the other. But unearthing the stories is difficult, and often impossible, because women in Syria face dire political, personal, and familiar consequences if they admit to being victims. Her article “Syria’s Unspoken Crimes” appears in the August issue of Vanity Fair. She’s also the author of Ghosts by Daylight: Love, War, and Redemption.

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The Takeaway

Snowden to Meet With Human Rights Groups in Quest for Asylum

Friday, July 12, 2013

After three weeks of silence, NSA leaker Edward Snowden is meeting with international human rights workers today from his base in the Moscow Airport. In an email invitation to groups like Human Rights Watch and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Snowden wrote that he has "been extremely fortunate to enjoy and accept many offers of support and asylum from brave countries around the world,” according to The New York Times. Joining us is Ellen Barry, Moscow correspondent for our partner The New York Times. She walks us through the possible outcomes this meeting could produce.

In an email invitation to groups like Human Rights Watch and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Snowden wrote that he has "been extremely fortunate to enjoy and accept many offers of support and asylum from brave countries around the world,” according to The New York Times. In the note, Snowden says that U.S. government is carrying out an "unlawful campaign" to block his attempts at being granted asylum.
Joining us is Ellen Barry, Moscow correspondent for our partner The New York Times. She walks us through the possible outcomes this meeting could produce

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Any Good From Evil?

Monday, May 13, 2013

James Dawes, professor of English and director of the Program in Human Rights and Humanitarianism at Macalester College in St. Paul, talks about what he learned about evil in a series of interviews with men convicted of war crimes during the Sino-Japanese War and asks whether there's anything of value to find in such studies or only sensationalism.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Louise Arbour on International Justice

Monday, April 22, 2013

Louise Arbour, president and chief executive officer of the International Crisis Group, discusses her work heading up the International Crisis Group and recent news in international justice.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Dr. Hawa Abdi, the Mother Theresa of Somalia

Thursday, April 04, 2013

Dr. Hawa Abdi has been called "the Mother Teresa of Somalia." Since 1991, when the Somali government collapsed, famine struck, and aid groups fled, she has dedicated herself to providing help for people whose lives have been shattered by violence and poverty. In her new memoir, Keeping Hope Alive: One Woman: 90,000 Lives Changed , she talks about founding a camp for internally displaced people located outside war-torn Mogadishu, Somalia. She also tells of being kidnapped by radical insurgents, who also destroyed much of her hospital, because she was a woman. She, along with media pressure, convinced the rebels to let her go, and she demanded and received a written apology. She's joined by her daughter, Dr. Deqo Mohamed.

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The Takeaway

The United Nations Approves Global Arms Control Treaty

Wednesday, April 03, 2013

On Tuesday the United Nations voted overwhelmingly to approve a first of its kind global arms trade treaty. Republican Senators and at least one Democrat immediately condemned the treaty, calling it a "non-starter" and vowing to oppose Senate ratification. And without ratification, it's just another piece of paper.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Escape from Camp 14: North Korea's Political Prisoners

Wednesday, April 03, 2013

Blaine Harden tells his story of Shin Donghyuk, who was born and raised—then escaped from—one of North Korea’s political prison camps. In Escape from Camp 14, he offers a narrative of Shin's life and remarkable escape and offers an inside account of one of the world's darkest nations.

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Micropolis

Micropolis: Gay Marriage, Bollywood Version

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

To understand just how much America -- and it's ideas about gay rights and other issues -- continue to influence the rest of the world, it's worth watching a movie called English Vinglish, a Bollywood hit from last year, starring Indian screen legend Sridevi. Her character, Shashi, is visiting her sister in the U.S. for a few weeks, and starts taking English-language classes in Manhattan.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Chen Guangcheng and Jerome Cohen

Friday, January 18, 2013

Chinese civil rights activist Chen Guangcheng talks about his work on human rights in China, his new life in the United States, and his views on the Chinese government. Joining him is Chinese law expert Jerome Cohen, professor of law at New York University School of Law and a senior fellow for Asia Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations. Ira Belkin, executive director of the U.S. Asia Law Institute at NYU School of Law, interprets Chen's remarks.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry

Friday, July 27, 2012

Director Alison Klayman discusses her documentary “Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry,” an up-close look at renowned Chinese artist and dissident Ai Weiwei and his ongoing battle with the Chinese government. Ai Weiwei is China's most celebrated contemporary artist, who helped design Beijing’s Bird’s Nest Olympic Stadium, and its most outspoken domestic critic. Against a backdrop of strict censorship, Ai has become a kind of Internet champion, using his blog and Twitter stream to organize, inform, and inspire his followers, becoming an underground hero to millions of Chinese citizens. “Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry” opens July 27 at the Lincoln Plaza Cinemas and IFC Center.

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The Takeaway

Not Going Away: Chen Guangcheng is a New Voice Driving Disability Rights

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng came into The Takeaway studio this week for what turned out to be a historic conversation in my estimation. Since when has the subject of disability rights been even remotely relevant to the wider global political discussion of human rights?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: Inside Syria

Thursday, July 12, 2012

Donatella Rovera, senior adviser on crisis response for Amnesty International, spent several weeks this spring in 23 of Syria’s towns and villages. On this week’s Underreported, she describes the damage she saw as traveled around the country and the stories she heard from Syrians about the tactics of the national army as fighting continues there, 16 months after the protests first began.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Impossible State: North Korea

Wednesday, July 04, 2012

Victor D. Cha, the former Director for Asian Affairs at the National Security Council discusses North Korea, the world's most controversial and isolated country. His book The Impossible State: North Korea, Past and Future documents the rise of the Kim family dynasty, and the obsessive personality cult that empowers them, and he illuminates the repressive regime's complex economy and culture.

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The Takeaway

Defining the 'Tipping Point' for Intervention in War

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

All this week The Takeaway has followed the news out of Syria, where a horrific massacre at the hands of Syrian government troops in the village of Houla recently left 108 civilians dead, including a number of children, most murdered at close-point range. Are we at a tipping point in Syria?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: Did Slaves Catch Your Seafood Dinner?

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Thailand is one of the largest exporters of seafood to the United States. On today’s Underreported segment, Global Post’s senior southeast Asian correspondent Patrick Winn investigates claims that forced labor is used on Thai fishing boats.

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The Takeaway

Chen Guangcheng's Impact from Abroad

Monday, May 21, 2012

Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng arrived in New York to a throng of cheering supporters on Saturday. He will soon begin a fellowship at New York University Law School's U.S.-Asia Law Institute, and he spoke to the crowd at NYU about his plight: "After much turbulence, I have come out of Shandong," he said, through an interpreter. "This is thanks to the assistance of many friends." Bob Fu is a Chinese human rights activist and pastor, living in the United States. He was instrumental in publicizing Chen Guangcheng's case and helped negotiate his release.

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The Takeaway

Madeleine Albright Explores the American Relationship with China

Thursday, May 03, 2012

Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright managed the United States' relationship with a rapidly-changing China at the turn of the millennium. As the United States and China continue to negotiate for the safety of dissident Chen Guangcheng, Secretary Albright discusses the United States' current relationship with China, and her new book, "Prague Winter: A Personal Story of Remembrance and War, 1937-1948."

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The Takeaway

Chinese Dissident Leaves US Embassy

Wednesday, May 02, 2012

Prominent Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng has left the U.S. embassy in Beijing a week after seeking shelter after escaping from house arrest. Jonathan Fenby is former editor of the South China Morning Post and his latest book on China is called “Tiger Head, Snake Tails: China Today."

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