Streams

 

Human Rights

PRI's The World

How an American scientist helps grandmothers in Argentina find their ‘stolen’ grandchildren

Thursday, August 07, 2014

For three decades, Mary-Claire King has led efforts to improve genetic technologies that can be used to identify the stolen children of Argentina’s Dirty War. Her partnership with The Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo has yielded remarkable results.

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PRI's The World

An American faces a bewildering end to her decade in Russia

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

American Jennifer Gaspar is married to a Russian and has lived in the country for ten years. As of August 8, she's no longer welcome to stay. Her American citizenship, work with NGOs and prominent husband might have something to do with it — but no one is sure.

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PRI's The World

A grandmother in Argentina finds her grandson after nearly 40 years

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

Estela de Carlotto has been searching for her grandson for 36 years. He was stolen during the Dirty War in Argentina. Now, after nearly four decades she has found him.

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PRI's The World

A summit of African leaders in Washington tries to move beyond 'speed dating'

Monday, August 04, 2014

The US is hosting its first-ever summit of leaders from across Africa, but the short timeframe and large number of attendees means that meaningful dialogue might be hard to achieve.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Human Rights in Bahrain; Radio Diaries; Straw Donor Case

Monday, May 06, 2013

Defense attorney Irwin Rochman talks about the case against his client, Xing Wu “Oliver” Pan. Pan has been convicted of a straw donor scheme to illegally raise campaign funds for New York City Comptroller John Liu. Plus: USA Today’s Susan Page on the latest political developments from Washington DC; Maryam al-Khawaja of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights; and a look back at the Radio Diaries project with founder and executive producer, Joe Richman.

Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Foreign Policy in Central America: Anastasio Somoza is Welcomed by Mayor Impellitteri

Friday, December 28, 2012

WNYC

At this official 1952 ceremony on the steps of City Hall, the president of Nicaragua, Anastasio Somoza, is welcomed to New York by Mayor Vincent R. Impellitteri. 

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

'Eleanor Roosevelt Remembered,' a Touching Tribute by Eight Women

Monday, December 17, 2012

WNYC

This 1962 tribute to the former first lady features eight women reminiscing about their friend, and illuminating the many different areas of Eleanor Roosevelt's politically wide-ranging life. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Making the Case Against Extraordinary Rendition

Monday, April 30, 2012

James Goldston, head of the Open Society Justice Initiative, talks about arguing a landmark court case in front of The European Court of Human Rights in May. Khaled El-Masry, a German citizen, alleges that he was abducted in Macedonia in 2004, flown to Afghanistan, interrogated there and then later released in Albania. It’s the first case to be heard about alleged abuses arising from the CIA’s policy of extraordinary rendition.

 

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On The Media

Everyone Should be able to Access the Internet

Friday, January 27, 2012

Brooke asks Harvard Law professor and co-founder of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society Jonathan Zittrain if access to the internet should be considered a human right.  He says that according to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, everyone has the right to receive and impart information through any media, and today's media of choice is the internet.

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On The Media

Internet is a tool, not a human right

Friday, January 27, 2012

In the quest to find out whether or not the internet is a human right, Brooke speaks to Vinton Cerf, one of the fathers of the internet. He says that the internet is a useful tool for improving the human condition, but because it is just a tool, it doesn't rise to the level of a human right.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Narrative Threads

Monday, January 02, 2012

Lawrence Weschler, director of the New York Institute for the Humanities at NYU, revisits some of his past "adventures," in essays on topics ranging from digital imagery to human rights in the Balkans and Rwanda. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Big Brother

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

While fighting against genocide in Africa, John Prendergast, human rights activist and co-founder of the Enough Project, was also a Big Brother to Michael Mattocks in Washington, D.C.  He talks about how that relationship helped them both and the book they co-authored, Unlikely Brothers: Our Story of Adventure, Loss, and Redemption.

Event: John Prendergast and Michael Mattocks will be having a conversation with Ann Curry at McNally Jackson Bookstore at 52 Prince Street on Wednesday 6/29 at 1:00 PM.

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The Takeaway

Famed Chinese Artist and Dissident, Ai Weiwei, Released from Prison

Thursday, June 23, 2011

Almost three months after his arrest in April, world-renowned artist and social activist Ai Weiwei was released Wednesday on bail from prison in China. Ai was arrested on charges of tax evasion during a crackdown on human rights activists, and has not commented on the government or his arrest since yesterday. He is perhaps best known for his design of the "Bird's Nest" stadium at the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

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Features

Written On the Water, Heard in the Wind: PEN World Voices Festival

Monday, April 25, 2011

The Pen World Voices Festival opens in New York on Monday. The annual event is a bold reminder that writing is not just a leisure art resulting in a commodity, but an instrument of change, a tool for probing everything from revolution to the human psyche, and a vital bridge between nations and individuals.

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The Takeaway

Updates from Bahrain and Libya

Monday, February 21, 2011

Protests continued to rage across the Middle East throughout the weekend. While the Bahraini government withdrew its military from the capital and allowed peaceful demonstrations, Libyan security forces continued to fire on protestors in Benghazi and Tripoli. Human Rights Watch estimates that the Libyan government has killed at least 223 protesters since political unrest began six days ago. But in a nationally-televised address, the son of Libyan ruler Col. Moammar Gadhafi, Seif al-Islam al-Gadhafi, claimed that the death toll was greatly exaggerated and that Libya was on the brink of civil war. Will Gadhafi hold onto power? What's next for Bahrain? And how will the Obama Administration respond?

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It's A Free Country ®

Protest Context: The History of Mubarak Abuses

Thursday, February 10, 2011

Torture actually spread, it became sort of an epidemic, which is what it is today, I'm sorry to say. It happens in police stations, it happens not just with political dissidents, it happens with people just picked up for suspicion of committing ordinary crimes. This has become a serious and widespread problem.

Joe Stork deputy director of Human Rights Watch's Middle East and North Africa division, on The Brian Lehrer Show

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Mubarak Before the Protests

Thursday, February 10, 2011

Yesterday New Yorker staff writer Lawrence Wright discussed his new article on Scientology. But when he was at the studios, he also discussed his past reporting on the roots of Al-Qaeda and the connection to Egyptian prisons and abuses under the Mubarak regime. Then, Joe Stork, deputy director of Human Rights Watch's Middle East and North Africa division joins us from Cairo and provides a history of oppression and abuse under the Mubarak regime.

→ Read a Recap and Join the Conversation at It's A Free Country

The Takeaway

Elephant in the Tea Room: China's Human Rights Record

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

China’s human rights record is on the agenda during Chinese President Hu Jintao’s visit to Washington this week. Meanwhile, political dissident and Chinese Nobel Peace Prize-winner Liu Xiaobo remains in prison and his wife, Liu Xia, is thought to be under house arrest. Chinese-American human rights activist and former political prisoner Dr. Sasha Gong was a political prisoner in the 1970s. She says she'd like to ask President Hu about human rights.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Human Rights: Europe's Roma and Uganda's Gays

Friday, October 22, 2010

Viktória Mohácsi, Roma activist and former Hungarian member of the European Parliament, and Julius Kaggwa, Ugandan lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) activist and director of Support Initiative for People with Atypical Sex Development, talk about their work being recognized by Human Rights First.

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The Takeaway

Violent Unrest Continues in Thailand

Monday, May 17, 2010

Anti-government unrest continues in downtown Bangkok and has spread to other areas of the capital, leaving at least 37 dead and hundreds injured in four days. On Sunday, the Thai government ruled out U.N.-backed mediation talks, which had been suggested by protest leaders; the government says no outside help is needed.  

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