Streams

 

Hugo

World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

The turmoil in Venezuela

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

The turmoil in Venezuela

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The New Yorker: Political Scene

Jon Lee Anderson and John Cassidy on Hugo Chavez's legacy.

Friday, March 08, 2013

Jon Lee Anderson and John Cassidy on Hugo Chavez's legacy.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Chavismo after Hugo Chavez?

Wednesday, March 06, 2013

Chavismo after Hugo Chavez?

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Hugo Chavez returns to power

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Hugo Chavez returns to power

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Slate Culture Gabfest

Slate: The Culture Gabfest, Half-Time In America Edition

Tuesday, February 07, 2012

In this week's Culture Gabfest, our critics Stephen Metcalf, Dana Stevens, and Julia Turner review Smash, NBC’s new musical series about the drama of Broadway. Next, they take in Hugo, Martin Scorsese Oscar-nominated 3-D ode to the early days of cinema.

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WNYC News

Look | Exploring Grand Central's Secrets With the Author of 'Hugo'

Friday, January 06, 2012

WNYC

When Brian O. Selznick wrote "The Invention of Hugo Cabret," a graphic novel about an orphan in 1930s Paris, he imagined the secret spaces of the Gare Montparnasse train station in Paris. For inspiration, he visited Grand Central Terminal, which we recently explored from its sub basement to its tower.

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Transportation Nation

Exploring Grand Central's Secrets, With the Author of Hugo Cabret

Friday, January 06, 2012

Photo: Brian Selznick in Grand Central's Clock Tower (photo Maya Bernstein/WNYC)

When Brian O. Selznick wrote "The Invention of Hugo Cabret," a graphic novel about an orphan in 1930's Paris, he imagined the secret spaces of the Gare Montparnasse, in Paris.  For inspiration, he visited Grand Central Terminal, and drew his interiors in pictures that were three inches by five inches. But the scenes in the book -- hidden tunnels, secret rooms, the giant clock tower -- were all drawn from Selznick's imagination, and then turned into the movie "Hugo," by Martin Scorcese.

But just recently, for the first time, Selznick got to explore Grand Central's secrets, with Transportation Nation's Andrea Bernstein.

The tour -- not open to members of the public -- took them to Grand Central's deepest sub basement, its lost and found, along its catwalks, and up into the clock tower.  And at each step along the way the station gave up its secrets, secrets eerily similar to the story of Hugo Cabret, a small boy who keeps the clocks running, steals to eat, and struggles to repair a lost automaton, his last connection to his dead father.

That struggle leads him to Isabel, an orphan raised by the station's toy seller, who mysteriously owns the key that will unlock the automaton.

Illustrations from The Invention of Hugo Cabret. Copyright 2007 by Brian Selznick. Used with permission from Scholastic Press.

 

Click for the audio and slide show on the slide show here.

 

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