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Howie Hawkins

WNYC News

Highlights From NY Governor Debate

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his Republican challenger traded insults and clashed over the economy, corruption, and race politics during the only scheduled debate of the governor's race.

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WNYC News

Cuomo, Astorino Plus Two In Buffalo Debate Tonight

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

WNYC
Republican Rob Astorino will finally get to debate Gov. Cuomo, though not one-on-one, in tonight's New York gubernatorial debate. You can hear it live on WNYC at 8 p.m.

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The Empire

The other third party, on the left

Thursday, November 04, 2010

...is the Green Party. Since their gubernatorial candidate got more than 50,00 votes yesterday, the Green Party will now have, for the next four years, a designated row on the ballot.

So, who is this newly established party?

They're self-identified progressives, who, in many ways, hold traditionally liberal fiscal and social positions. They fell out of favor with some voters after Ralph Nader ran for president on their line, spoiling Al Gore's Democratic bid. The presidential bid by controversial former Rep. Cynthia McKinney only further damaged the party.

But in New York, the party is back, thanks to Howie Hawkin's passionate performance in the only gubernatorial debate this year. And since Cuomo didn't face a serious challenge from his Republican opponent, a lot of voters were free to vote for one of the other candidates in order to make a statement.

Thus, the Green Party is back.

A spokesman for the Green Party told me they're not like the other progressive political party, the labor-backed Working Families Party, mainly because Greens want to run their own candidates. WFP often cross-endorses Democrats (and withhold their WFP line from Democrats as a form of punishment).

"Very few people in the party are fans of fusion voting," Green Party co-chair Eric Jones told me. "We try to run as many of our candidates as possible, rather than run just the same guy on a different line."

"When you look at the issues, we have a lot in common," with the WFP, sayd Jones. The agendas of the two parties are "almost identical" he said.

WFP executive director Dan Cantor emailed supporters this afternoon, reasserting his party's role as a guiding force to pull Democrats further left.

"The only force powerful enough to push back against an emboldened Fox News, corporate Republicans and overly-timid Democrats is you," Cantor wrote.

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WNYC News

Gubernatorial Candidates Face Off in Wide-Ranging Debate

Monday, October 18, 2010

Major party candidates for Governor Andrew Cuomo and Carl Paladino did not engage one another during a televised debate, that included all seven candidates in the race. They also mostly ignored numerous jabs from the five minor party candidates who were also present on the debate stage.

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Transportation Nation

NY Minor Party Candidates have Transportation Plans

Monday, October 18, 2010

(Andrea Bernstein, Transportation Nation) There was a fascinating segment on The Brian Lehrer Show this morning, where he spoke with each of the five non-major party candidates for NY Governor. Well worth a listen, particularly because three of the candidates: Charles Barron, the Freedom Party candidate, Howie Hawkins of the Green Party and Warren Redlich of the Libertarian Party made transit or transportation part of their plans. We've already written about Barron's proposals on free transit (here and here), and he expanded on it today. Hawkins also spoke at some length about transit being part of what would make the state more sustainable. And Libertarian Party candidate Redlich put forth a proposal to combine the State DOT and the Thruway Authority. This is not such a fringe idea -- Massachusetts Governor Duval Patrick did something similar last year, and that state's DOT has been something of a hotbed of innovation.

In his policy "book," Democratic candidate Andrew Cuomo does wax at length about the need to streamline New York's government, and reduce the number of authorities. It's one of his main animating principles. But there are no specifics about how he'd reorganize transportation agencies, and while his economic development proposal offers a bit more, the details are still maddeningly few. We'll be trying to find out more in the next two weeks -- meantime, send us what you know.

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The Empire

Cuomo says Paladino wants a crowded debate

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

As New York Post State Editor Fred Dicker noted in an interview with front-running gubernatorial candidate Andrew Cuomo, it's usually the leading candidate in a race who wants to have a debate with as many rivals at once, in order to turn the opposition into a noisy, inaudible cacophony.

But to hear Cuomo tell it, it's his Republican rival, Carl Paladino, who wants to invite the minor-party candidates into their debates.

In response to a reporter's question about debates, here's what Cuomo said this afternoon during a press conference on the City Hall steps:

"I understand the advantages of a one-on-one debate. I also understand the argument for inclusiveness that the Paladino camp is making that everybody should be invited."

In addition to Cuomo and Paladino, there are a number of gubernatorial candidates on the ballot, including: Charles Barron (Freedom Party) Howie Hawkins (Green Party), Steve Cohn (Tea Party) and others.

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