Streams

 

Hosni Mubarak

The Takeaway

Obama Administration Discusses Plans for Interim Government in Egypt

Friday, February 04, 2011

The New York Times has reported that the Obama administration is discussing a proposal with Egyptian officials for President Hosni Mubarak to step down immediately and hand over power to Vice President Omar Suleiman. Under this proposal, Suleiman would run a transitional government until elections are held later this year. Before being appointed to the vice presidency last week, Suleiman was the coordinator of the CIA’s extraordinary rendition program.

Comment

WQXR News

Protests Rage on in Egypt

Thursday, February 03, 2011

The White House continues to call for "free and fair elections," amid continuing protests in Egypt this week. Meanwhile, uprisings throughout the region, especially in Yemen, are also gaining ground. 

Comment

It's A Free Country ®

Assessing Egypt's Future

Thursday, February 03, 2011

We should listen to the young people. They have basic demands: they want freedom. This is the internet generation, people who were born under Mubarak, who have a large number of unemployed, they belong to the—at least—40 percent of Egyptians who live under the poverty line. They need jobs, they need houses, they need to marry and start families. They do not care much about politics—the right or the left—and that's a good sign!

Aladdin Elaasar, former Presidential candidate, on the Brian Lehrer Show

Comments [6]

It's A Free Country ®

What's Beyond Egypt?

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

WNYC
I'm hearing it from a number of people that there's is great rage and frustration that Gamal Mubarak is the one that, even more than his father, who's looked at as the one who engineered the electoral fraud in the last election...Gamal Mubarak has been refusing to resign his position in the NDP [National Democratic Party]...I think people should be talking about Gamal and expecting Gamal to come out and resign his post and position.

Steve Clemons, director of the American Strategy Program at the New America Foundation, on the Brian Lehrer Show

Comments [16]

The Takeaway

A Face in the Crowd: Adham Bakry

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

The sense of jubilation felt by millions of Egyptian protesters yesterday has quickly soured as clashes between pro-Mubarak and anti-government protesters erupted in Cairo and Alexandria. What's being described as a choreographed backlash against the opposition broke out Wednesday in Cairo's Tahrir Square, after protesters refused to leave Tuesday night following President Hosni Mubarak's pledge not to seek a new term.

Read More

Comment

It's A Free Blog

The Lessons of Obama's Cairo Speech

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

You’ve heard the phrase, “lead, follow or get out of the way.” In these cases, we can do a little of each: leading in declaring unwavering support for democratic principles, following the events with support for proper process and the safety of local populations, and making sure we play no role in obstructing the astonishing show of popular expression or the subsequent march toward new, fair elections — whether in Egypt and or wherever people rise up next.

Read More

Comment

It's A Free Country ®

Open Thread: Two Speeches, Any Answers?

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

In two closely-timed speeches Tuesday night, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak and United States President Barack Obama addressed the massive pro-democracy protests that have rocked the Arab world for the last week. Mubarak vowed to not run for reelection this September, while many protesters continued to insist he leave the country by Friday. President Obama spoke with Mubarak this evening and insisted that an "orderly transition must be meaningful, peaceful, and must begin now."

What did you make of the two remarks? Were they convincing to you? Do you think they will be convincing to the protesters in the Middle East? Let us know, the comments thread is open!

Comments [1]

It's A Free Country ®

#Jan25, #Mubarak, #Egypt: The Arab Diaspora on Twitter

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

WNYC

#Egyptians have won. No matter how long it takes 4 #Mubarak 2 leave already, let's take this moment and say MABROUK (CONGRATS) EGYPT. #JAN25

@monaeltahawy, Egyptian American columnist, blogger, and activist.

Comment

It's A Free Country ®

The Future of US/Egypt Relations

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

WNYC

I think what's really interesting about this situation is how much of a spectator the United States is really being forced to play. They don't have a lot of options right now, which is ironic considering the amount of money the United States has funeled into the Egyptian military over the past 30 years. But how much leverage has that bought in a situation like this? It's really hard to say.

— Rachel Martin, NPR National Security Correspondent, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

Comments [12]

The Takeaway

What We Are Seeing: Army vs. Police

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

Thousands of people have been demonstrating in the streets of Egypt for more than a week, and the army has backed them all the way. That's in stark contrast to the protesters' relationship with the police which has been strained for the past few decades of President Mubarak's regime.

Read More

Comment

The Takeaway

A Face in the Crowd: 'Syriana' Actor Amr Waked

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

Actor Amr Waked is best known to Western audiences for his role in the George Clooney oil movie Syriana, but this week, he has been protesting along with millions of his countrymen in Tahrir (Liberation) Square in Cairo, as the Egyptian people rise up in an attempt to overthrow President Hosni Mubarak, who has ruled the country for 30 years.

Read More

Comments [3]

The Takeaway

Reflecting on March of Millions

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

In what is being dubbed the "March of Millions," hundreds of thousands of Egyptians have taken to the streets in the eighth day of protests against President Hosni Mubarak. Demonstrations have vowed to remain on the streets until Mubarak, who has held his position for more than 30 years, quits. Protests are taking place in Tahrir Square, which translates to Liberation Square.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Competing Factions Vie for Power in Egypt

Monday, January 31, 2011

On Friday, President Hosni Mubarak appointed Omar Suleiman as the country's new vice president. And Nobel Laureate Mohamed ElBaradei returned to his native country and is adopting a leadership role. One of Egypt's most powerful opposition groups, the Muslim Brotherhood, has increased its presence on the streets of Cairo.As Egypt’s central power wobbles, the global conversation has turned to the big question: who will step in if Mubarak leaves?

Comment

The Takeaway

How President Mubarak May Cling to Power

Monday, January 31, 2011

History is unfolding in Egypt, as almost a week of popular protests threatens President Hosni Mubarak’s authoritarian regime. Some analysts say his regime is now in terminal decline. But Prof. Rashid Khalidi is warning that the president may still resort to violence to maintain power. 

Comment

The Takeaway

Protest Day 7: Calls for Change Continue as Thousands Defy President

Monday, January 31, 2011

Protesters in Egypt are not giving up. The unrest against the ruling regime continued into its sixth day, as tens of thousands flocked to the Cairo's Tahrir (or Liberation) Square. Among those protesters on Sunday was the diplomat, Mohamed ElBaradei, who is now representing a loosely unified opposition to President Hosni Mubarak.

Comments [2]

It's A Free Country ®

Egypt 101: Questions, Answers, Guides

Monday, January 31, 2011

Confused about the situation in Egypt? You're not alone. On this morning's Brian Lehrer Show, Shadi Hamid, director of research at the Brookings Doha Center and fellow at the Saban Center for middle East Policy, answered questions from callers and It's a Free Country commentators about the uprising: how it started, where it's headed, and what Egyptians really want from the United States.

Comments [20]

It's A Free Country ®

Egypt Protests One Week In

Monday, January 31, 2011

This is Egypt focusing on Egypt. Yes, Mubarak has been one of the major allies of US administrations for decades now, and they knew very well that he was a dictator and ran a police state, but this revolution is about getting rid of his tyranny and his dictatorship of 30 years. It has nothing to do with the US and Israel. It has everything to do with Egypt saying this it the time for our freedom and dignity..

Mona Eltahawycolumnist and public speaker on Arab and Muslim issues, on The Brian Lehrer Show

Comments [14]

The Takeaway

The Egyptian Military, Loyal to the People?

Monday, January 31, 2011

The Egyptian military has had a major hand in the country's government since it helped overthrow the monarchy back in 1952. Since then, it has been an institution respected and feared by the people and government of Egypt. Now, the military is at a crossroads, as protests have broken out across the country calling for the removal of President Hosni Mubarak. Sent into disperse crowds, many soldiers have embraced them.

Comments [1]

The Brian Lehrer Show

The Uprising in Egypt

Monday, January 31, 2011

Mona Eltahawycolumnist and public speaker on Arab and Muslim issues, Amira Al HussainiGlobal Voices Online regional editor for the Middle East and North Africa, continue the conversation about protests in the region.

→Read More And Join The Conversation At It's A Free Country

It's A Free Blog

When Quiet Diplomacy May Beat Grandstanding

Monday, January 31, 2011

WNYC

On Friday, Americans discovered they didn’t need a television to catch the most gripping program around – and that, in most parts of the country, TV wouldn’t help them.

Read More

Comment