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Hosni Mubarak

The Takeaway

Audio Essay: Hosni Mubarak and Ariel Sharon's Enduring Legacies

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

Although this morning the focus is on Egypt, right across the border Ariel Sharon is also in this "not dead" state. For two leaders that once went head to head, now they are so alive that when they are dead, they are still alive. In this audio essay, John Hockenberry asks: Can they ever die?

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The Takeaway

What Would Mubarak's Death Mean for Egypt?

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

The health of Hosni Mubarak has injected a new uncertainty into the political and constitutional crisis in Egypt. Nancy Yousef joins us to discuss what the former president’s death would mean for Egypt and the legacy he would leave behind. Nancy is an Egyptian American and a professor at CUNY Baruch in New York.

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The Takeaway

The Secret Police Files from Mubarak's Reign

Thursday, June 07, 2012

Activists say the Mubarak regime tortured and killed many who they deemed enemies of the state. And it's all archived in the secret files of the secret police, files that could further incriminate Mubarak and spell bad news for his cronies. Helena Merriman investigated the whereabouts of the secret police files and spoke with protesters who stormed government buildings to sneak out what files they could.

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WNYC News

In Little Egypt, New Yorkers Cast a Ballot for Mubarak's Successor

Thursday, May 24, 2012

When the polls close on Thursday after two days of voting – and over a year of post-revolution confusion – Egypt will have elected its first president since Hosni Mubarak. Who that should be depends on who you ask.

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The Takeaway

Egypt's Youth and Today's Historic Presidential Election

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

History will be made in Egypt today and the country’s political future will be determined. Egyptians are heading to the polls to elect a new president after an extraordinary 15 months that saw revolution, violence, and upheaval. Noel King, a freelance journalist in Egypt, joins to talk about the country's youth vote.

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The Takeaway

What Today's Election Will Mean to Egyptians

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Egyptians go to the polls today to vote for a president, marking the first time the country's citizens will freely elect a president since coming under military dictatorship 60 years ago. A lot has changed in the country since President Hosni Mubarak was ousted in February of 2011 – so much so that it's not even clear what the new president's powers will be. Joining us from Cairo is Hugh Sykes, correspondent for our partner the BBC.

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The Takeaway

Egypt One Year After the Revolution

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Today marks the one year anniversary of the uprising in Egypt that ousted President Hosni Mubarak. Over the past twelve months, the country has taken big steps to transition to a more democratic government. Egypt rewrote its constitution and the first freely elected parliament in more than 60 years held their first session this week.

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The Washington Report

Egypt One Year After the Uprising

Monday, January 09, 2012

In this week's Washington Report, David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for the New York Times, speaks to Kerry Nolan about Egypt.

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The Takeaway

Former Egyptian Leader Mubarak Back On Trial

Monday, August 15, 2011

Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's trial resumes today. Mubarak is charged with conspiring to kill protesters who drove him from office in February, and could face the death penalty if he's convicted. There are many Egyptians who want to see Mubarak found guilty and punished for the alleged crimes he committed during his 30 years of power. Could such overwhelming disdain for this man keep him from receiving a fair trial?

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The Takeaway

Live Update from Hosni Mubarak Trial in Cairo

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

Millions around the world have been captivated this morning by the televised feed of the trial of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Cairo. Courtroom cameras show Mubarak dressed in white, laying on a gurney inside a cage constructed in a makeshift courtroom in Cairo's police academy. Mubarak, his two sons, the former Egyptian interior minister, and six senior police officials stand accused of corruption and ordering the killings of protesters during the uprising the brought an end of Mubarak's three decade long rule. Kristen Chick, Cairo correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor, has been observing the scene outside the trial.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Middle East Update: Egypt

Tuesday, August 02, 2011

We hear from Steven A. Cook, Hasib J. Sabbagh senior fellow for Middle Eastern Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations and author of the forthcoming book The Struggle for Egypt: From Nasser to Tahrir Square, on the recent demonstrations, the trial of Hosni Mubarak and other Egyptian developments.

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The Takeaway

Egypt’s Revolutionary Unity Turns Sour

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Thousands of activists who helped topple Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in February have returned to Cairo's Tahrir Square, unhappy at the scale of change. "We have a feeling the regime is still there, somehow," Tarek Geddawy, 25, told Anthony Shadid of The New York Times. "They sacrificed the icons of the regime, but the cornerstone is still there." Shadid, The Times' Beirut bureau chief, just returned from Tahrir Square and reports on the protesters' activities there.

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The Takeaway

Forgetting the Past to Build Future in Egypt

Thursday, May 19, 2011

Egypt is changing. And so are its street names, signs of buildings, schools, hospitals and other institutions. What was once the Hosni Mubarak Library is now the Revolution Library. The Hosni Mubarak Experimental School is now just the Experimental School. And the Suzanne Mubarak Specialized Hospital is now the Red Crescent Specialized Hospital. This comes after a Cairo court ordered for all the images and signs with the name of Hosni Mubarak and his wife, Suzanne, be removed from public places and buildings. Egypt will most certainly have to go through a transitional period to move from the 40-year rule of Hosni Mubarak into a democracy. But does a country need to forget the past in order to build a future?

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The Takeaway

Who Defends Accused War Criminals?

Tuesday, April 19, 2011

Over the past few months, throughout the Middle East and Northern Africa, there have been countless testimonies about the human rights abuses committed by dictators clinging to power. Protesters in Egypt and Libya have struggled to draw international attention to abuses of power in their countries by leaders Hosni Mubarak and Moammar Gadhafi. In Ivory Coast, human rights observers warned of a possible genocide as hundreds were killed during Laurent Gbagbo's final weeks in power. But what happens to the leaders after they're ousted? And what's the role today of the International Criminal Court in pursuing these cases? 

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It's A Free Blog

Monday Morning Reality Check: Martial Law, Not Democracy in Egypt

Monday, February 14, 2011

Champions of democracy the world over welcomed the departure of Hosni Mubarak, Friday, with a massive display of joy. Protesters across Cairo savored their victory, and correspondents on TV channels worldwide fought back tears (some, in fact did cry) as they reported the story of a revolution.

I was inspired, instead, to turn to Brother Webster -- as in Webster’s Dictionary, for a little reminder of what all the hoopla was about:

Revolution |n. (pl. s)(Origin Latin revolutio.) a fundamental change in power that takes place in a relatively short period of time.

Given this definition – “a fundamental change in power” perhaps the celebration is a bit premature. I hate to be a spoilsport, but I’m fairly confident that military regime is not what the youth of Egypt had in mind over these last three weeks. And “revolutionary change” is certainly not what has come to Egypt – not yet.

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The Washington Report

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, February 14, 2011

NYT's David Sanger weighs in on President Hosni Mubarak's resignation and what this means for the rest of the region.

WQXR News

Obama Pledges Support, Confidence in Egypt

Friday, February 11, 2011

The resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak is sparking celebration among Egyptians worldwide. Hundreds of thousands chanted and cheered in Cairo's main square following Friday's announcement.

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It's A Free Country ®

Pres. Obama: 'The People of Egypt Have Spoken.'

Friday, February 11, 2011

Hours after the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, President Barack Obama remarked on the situation from the Grand Foyer of the White House.

"The people of Egypt have spoken," Obama said. "Their voices have been heard. And Egypt will never be the same."

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WNYC News

In Show of Solidarity With Egyptians, Hundreds Converge on Times Square

Friday, February 04, 2011

As a nascent revolution rages in Cairo, demonstrations in support of Egyptian protestors continue to take place throughout New York City. Beginning last Saturday with a rally in front of the United Nations headquarters, a week of public organizing was capped off by a large, loud gathering on Friday in Times Square.

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WQXR News

Protesters Flood Tahrir Square on 'Day of Departure'

Friday, February 04, 2011

WNYC

More than 100,000 protesters have been pouring into Tahrir Square in Egypt's capital Cairo as pressure to remove President Hosni Mubarak mounts, according to the Associated Press.

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