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Hong Kong

Studio 360

Five Things You Had to See Online This Week

Thursday, October 09, 2014

Hong Kong protests illustrated, honest Transformers, BBC and friends cover The Beach Boys, Putin gets a weird birthday gift, and "Singin' in the Rain" sans singin.
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The Takeaway

Hong Kong Leaders Open to Talks with Protestors

Friday, October 03, 2014

Hong Kong's Beijing-appointed leader announced that he won't be stepping down, but said he is open to talks with the protesters.

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WQXR Blog

New Video: Hong Kong Protesters Carry Violins, Cellos

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

As the standoff between China and pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong continues, some protesters have been rallying to "Do You Hear the People Sing?" from Les Miserables.
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The Brian Lehrer Show

Hong Kong Erupts

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Washington Post Beijing correspondent William Wan updates the situation in Hong Kong.

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The Takeaway

Trouble at Home: Hong Kong's Path to Democracy

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Journalist and professor Louisa Lim explains what it's been like to watch the streets where she grew up erupt in chaos almost overnight.

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The Takeaway

Hong Kong's Democratic Awakening

Monday, September 29, 2014

Thousands in Hong Kong are stepping up to demand democracy, but the Chinese government is pushing back with tear gas, batons, and pepper spray.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Hong Kong Rallies

Monday, August 25, 2014

New York Times reporter Michael Forsythe talks about the island's pro-democracy movement and the counter-protest held by Beijing loyalists earlier this week.

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The Takeaway

Thousands Protest in Hong Kong

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

Promises of autonomy have remained largely unfulfilled, which has triggered annual protests in Hong Kong every year on July 1. This week, hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets of Hong Kong to demand democracy in one of the largest marches in Hong Kong’s history. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Fast Item #1: Explaining Extradition

Friday, June 28, 2013

Stephen Vladeck, Professor of Law and Associate Dean for Scholarship at American University Washington College of Law, explains extradition in light of Edward Snowden.

 

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The Takeaway

Will Edward Snowden be Allowed to Stay in Hong Kong?

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Hong Kong could be the center of an international legal battle now that NSA-leaker Edward Snowden has announced his intentions to stay in the city. Though it maintains a judiciary, media, and educational system of it's own, the city is technically part of China, and has an extradition agreement with the U.S. Emily Lau, chairwoman of Hong Kong’s Democratic Party, explains the political pressures Hong Kong's leaders expect to face should the U.S. make a move to extradite him.

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The Takeaway

Extradition or Rendition: How Will the U.S. Get Snowden Back on U.S. Territory?

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

The Los Angeles Times has reported that officials are trying to move as quickly as possible, to prevent Snowden from leaking any more information. The question is, how exactly will they have Snowden returned to the U.S.? Extradition? Or some other method? Ashley Deeks, a University of Virginia law professor and former State Department adviser on matters of extradition, explains the Obama administration's options.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Monday Morning Politics: Chinese President Xi; NSA Leaker Comes Forward

Monday, June 10, 2013

Michael Hirsh, chief correspondent for National Journal, talks about the latest news out of Washington, including President Obama's meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping. The meeting has particular significance given the latest news about government surveillance -- Edward Snowden, the contractor who has come forward as the main source of the NSA leaks, is currently in Hong Kong and seeking asylum from US extradition.

→ Listen: Glenn Greenwald Discusses NSA Leaks on The Brian Lehrer Show

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Transportation Nation

Jay Walder Says His Replacement Doesn't Need Transit Background

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Jay Walder, taking questions from reporters the September 2011 MTA board meeting (photo by Kate Hinds)

The CEO of New York's MTA, Jay Walder, said that his successor doesn't necessarily have to have a transportation background -- but he or she does have to love it.

"Whoever runs this organization should be dedicated to the organization," he said,  and "be dedicated to what it does on a day-to-day basis." Walder went on to say: "I think it is helpful to have a knowledge of mass transit. I don't know that it's an absolutely essential quality."

His remarks came at his final meeting of the MTA board before he leaves for a job in Hong Kong next month, where he'll be heading that city's transit agency.

In an interview last week, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, whose administration is currently looking for Walder's replacement, also telegraphed that the next MTA chief may not come from the transportation world.  He told New York State Public Radio's Karen DeWitt in a telephone interview that his administration was engaged in a  "very aggressive talent search." And he said didn't necessarily want to hire a "transit geek."

"The MTA primarily is an effective manager, and I think the ability to manage a complex process, that deals with highly technical services, in a political environment, in a large organization, at a financially strapped time, you know, that's where we are," Cuomo said. "To me, the management is very important. Of course, the technical expertise, but you give me a good manager, who can run an organization, and find efficiency, that this organization is going to have to find, that's going to be paramount."

The next head of the MTA will be managing a delicate financial situation, as Walder pointed out in today's meeting. "As you look forward for the MTA, I think you need to be able to find a way to have both sufficient resources and stability of resources," he said. "I think the ups and downs of the economic cycle create financial burdens for the organization that's inconsistent with the fact that we have a service that continues to run 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. And frankly, I don't think all of us don't want to see that service have to suffer through that."

When asked later if he had any regrets about his tenure, he said "I wish the economic situation I came into was different...[but] you have to play the hand you were dealt. And the hand we were dealt was one that said this was a very very difficult time financially."

But Walder said he was proud of the work the MTA had done under his tenure. "Nothing happens at the MTA because the person in the corner office at 347 Madison Avenue [MTA's current headquarters] says it should happen. Things happen at the MTA because 67,000 dedicated men and women make it happen." He repeatedly praised MTA staffers of all stripes -- from token booth clerks to management to his colleagues on the board. "When we say we're going to get something done, the result is truly, truly incredible."

When the meeting's official business was over -- and it was dispatched with in under 20 minutes -- board members took to the microphones to tell Walder how much they'd miss him. Nancy Shevell said that right after she began working with Walder, she told a friend "well, it's just a short matter of time before a large public-sector company scoops him up. And it happened, and I'm not surprised. And it's sad, in my opinion, for the MTA."

"You are the tallest person in the room," said Allen Cappelli Mark Lebow. "You will probably be the tallest person in China, and you will, I'm sure, be the tallest achiever there as you were here."  (Walder: "I think Yao Ming is going back.")

Governor Cuomo hasn't yet said when he will announce Walder's replacement. As for Walder, he greeted a Chinese-speaking reporter with a hearty "Ni Hao" -- and then said he was going down to the Rosetta Stone store.

 

 

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Hong Kong Filmmaker Tsui Hark

Thursday, September 01, 2011

Hong Kong filmmaker Tsui Hark talks about his career and his mega-hit films “Detective Dee and the Mystery of the Phantom Flame,”  “Peking Opera Blues,” and “Green Snake.” He was presented with the 2011 Star Asia Lifetime Achievement Award at the New York Asian Film Festival in July. Tsui Hark is viewed as a major figure in the Golden Age of Hong Kong cinema, and was part of the "New Wave" of young, iconoclastic directors that emerged in the late 1970s and early 1980s. “Detective Dee and the Mystery of the Phantom Flame” opens in New York Friday at Angelika and the Regal E-Walk 13.

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Features

Behind the Scenes: Awakening the Dragon Boat

Thursday, July 28, 2011

On Thursday, organizers and affiliates of the 21st annual Hong Kong Dragon Boat Festival in New York gathered in Battery Park City's Wagner Park for a traditional dragon boat awakening ceremony. The event included a blessing of the boat and a martial arts performance. Check out a slideshow here.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Hong Kong Filmmaker Tsui Hark

Monday, July 11, 2011

Hong Kong filmmaker Tsui Hark talks about his career and his mega-hit films “Detective Dee and the Mystery of the Phantom Flame” and “The Blade.” He’s being presented with the 2011 Star Asia Lifetime Achievement Award at the New York Asian Film Festival, which takes place July 1-14.

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Transportation Nation

Bloomberg Takes City Sustainability Program Global

Monday, November 08, 2010

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg Rides the Subway in Hong Kong

(Andrea Bernstein, Transportation Nation) Climate change legislation -- "cap and trade" as Republicans called it on the campaign trail -- took a serious beating last week.  A bill, as you may recall, passed the U.S. House of Representatives, but went nowhere in the U.S. Senate, and prospects seem dim for federal action on climate change in the near term.  Instead, the debate -- and any action -- will likely take place on the smaller stage of city halls across the nation.  To underline this (and perhaps his own national ambitions)  -- New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who is the new head of a global cities climate "leadership group,"  spent time riding the subways and stumping for his cause in Hong Kong over the weekend.    Here' s an excerpt of his speech:

“Let me start out by saying, my colleagues: it was just five short years ago that 18 of the world’s great cities came together, to share best practices and make common cause in the greatest global challenge of our time – and that is reducing greenhouse gas emissions that contribute so heavily to climate change.

“We all recognized that cities – where for the first time in history, half the world’s population now live and which together account for more than 70 percent of the world’s greenhouse gas production – holds the future of humanity.

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Features

Hong Kong Dragon Boat Wakes Up in Queens

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

WNYC

Moments before the sky opened up to a sticky summer storm, a dry wooden dragon appeared in Kew Gardens. Traditional lion dancers performed on the concrete as Buddhist monks blessed the dragonhead, which happened to be attached to a one-ton wooden boat.

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Studio 360

Hong Kong Cinema

Saturday, October 15, 2005

The best heroes and villains are often reflections of each other, like Sherlock Holmes and Professor Moriarty. Jocelyn Gonzales has observed this theme playing out in the martial arts films of China and Hong Kong. Besides making American action movies more exciting again, Hong Kong cinema has somehow combined Eastern ...

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Studio 360

Hong Kong Cinema

Saturday, April 26, 2003

The best heroes and villains are often reflections of each other. Think of Sherlock Holmes versus Professor Moriarty or even Luke versus Darth in Star Wars. There's something of each in the other. This theme has been playing out for years in the martial arts and gangster films of ...

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