Streams

 

Holocaust

The Takeaway

The Sounds of Liberation from The Depths of a Concentration Camp

Monday, April 20, 2015

The Takeaway looks back on the 70th anniversary of the liberation of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp.

Comment

To the Best of Our Knowledge

Singer Diamanda Galas: The 100th Anniversary of the Armenian Genocide

Sunday, April 19, 2015

There are many ways to react to the tragedies of the past. Politically. Historically. And even… musically.

Comment

To the Best of Our Knowledge

Novelist Remembers Armenian Massacre, 100 Years Later

Sunday, April 19, 2015

 Judith Claire MItchell's first novel  “The Last Day of the War” is set just after World War I, when Europe's peace brokers decided to ignore the Armenian massacres.  She talks about the painful legacy of that decision, 100 years later.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Surviving Auschwitz, And Life Afterwards

Friday, April 17, 2015

Goran Rosenberg tells the story of his father, who survived the death camp at Auschwitz-Birkenau, and whose final challenge was to survive the survival. 

Comments [11]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Family Legacies: A Dictator's Son, A Holocaust Survivor's Father

Friday, April 17, 2015

Charles Taylor's American son. Attempting to survive the aftermath of Auschwitz. The new film "Toto and his Sisters.” Neil DeGrasse Tyson joins us for Please Explain: The Cosmos! 

The Leonard Lopate Show

How One Isolated French Town Saved 3,500 Jews during WWII

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

A community of men and women living in the upper reaches of the Loire Valley offered sanctuary, kindness, solidarity and hospitality, knowing full well the consequences to themselves.

Comments [14]

The Takeaway

The Battle Against Hitler: A Portrait of Courage

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Dietrich von Hildebrand spoke out against Nazism a decade before Hitler's political rise. A historian reflects on Hildebrand's legacy, as the world remembers Auschwitz's liberation.

Comments [1]

Operavore

Review: Grand Production Fails to Animate The Passenger

Friday, July 11, 2014

Mieczyslaw Weinberg's 1968 opera The Passenger is not the great, cathartic Holocaust opera that we've been waiting for, writes David Patrick Stearns.

Read More

Comments [3]

The Takeaway

Tracing An Ill-Fated Voyage to Escape the Nazis

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Today marks the 75th anniversary of a ship setting sail. It's a ship you probably haven't heard of, but one that tells an important and dark story about our country's past.

Comments [8]

The Leonard Lopate Show

“Hannah Arendt”

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Director Margarethe von Trotta discusses her biopic “Hannah Arendt,” along with Barbara Sukowa, who plays the influential German-Jewish philosopher and political theorist Hannah Arendt. Arendt’s reporting on the 1961 trial of ex-Nazi Adolf Eichmann in The New Yorker—controversial both for her portrayal of Eichmann and the Jewish councils—introduced her now-famous concept of the “Banality of Evil.” “Hannah Arendt” opens May 29 at Film Forum.

Comments [10]

Operavore

Opera Based on Real-Life Holocaust Survivors to Premiere

Saturday, April 27, 2013

There's a new opera premiering this month called Steal a Pencil for Me. It's about a real-life Jewish couple from the Netherlands who survived the Holocaust.

Read More

Comments [2]

Operavore

'Defiant Requiem' Reprises Holocaust-Era Performance of Verdi Piece

Monday, April 01, 2013

A documentary and ongoing concert project looks at the Terezín concentration camp, where inmates sang the Verdi Requiem for their own dignity and solace—and to challenge their Nazi captors.

Read More

Comments [3]

WNYC News

Holocaust Survivors Reflect on Astounding New Findings

Sunday, March 03, 2013

The number of camps and ghettos established by Nazi Germany is far more than previously believed, and the findings are shocking both scholars and descendants of Holocaust victims and survivors.

Comments [4]

Radiolab

Mr. Bliss

Monday, December 17, 2012

First: a perfect moment. On day 86 of a 3-month trek to and from the South Pole, adventurer Aleksander Gamme discovered something he'd stashed under the ice at the start of his trip. He wasn't expecting such a rush of happiness in that cold, hungry ...

Comments [34]

Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Fighting American Anti-Semitism After the Holocaust

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

WNYC

Beginning in 1947, Jewish and secular civic groups formed the Citizens Committee on Displaced Persons in a public campaign to liberalize U.S. immigration quotas, with the hope that many more Holocaust survivors would be permitted to settle in America.

Read More

Comment

On Being

Robi Damelin and Ali Abu Awaad — No More Taking Sides [remix]

Thursday, November 29, 2012

Robi Damelin lost her son David to a Palestinian sniper. Ali Abu Awwad lost his older brother Yousef to an Israeli soldier. But, instead of clinging to traditional ideologies and turning their pain into more violence, they've decided to understand the oth

Comment

On Being

[Unedited] Robi Damelin and Ali Abu Awwad with Krista Tippett

Thursday, November 29, 2012

Robi Damelin lost her son David to a Palestinian sniper. Ali Abu Awwad lost his older brother Yousef to an Israeli soldier. But, instead of clinging to traditional ideologies and turning their pain into more violence, they've decided to understand the oth

Comment

Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: Holding Fast

Sunday, August 26, 2012

Failing a moral test, and the cost of love and loss in stories by American and Irish contemporary writers.

Comment

Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: An Irish Ear: Colum McCann’s Favorite Stories

Sunday, August 19, 2012

Ultimate acts in stories selected by Colum McCann, and a sharp-edged fantasy by Molly Giles).

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Madeleine Albright on History, Identity and American Power

Friday, May 04, 2012

Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright has spent her career working on complicated issues of history, ethnic identity, and governance, but she didn't realize the complexity of her own identity until the age of 59. In 1997, as the Clinton Administration vetted then-Ambassador Albright for the Secretary of State position, Albright discovered that most of her family was Jewish — and that many of her relatives perished in the Holocaust. That realization provided the impetus for her new book, "Prague Winter."

Comments [3]