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Holocaust

The Takeaway

Remembering the Holocaust: the Thersienstadt Ghetto

Thursday, April 19, 2012

Today is one of the most somber points in the Israeli calendar, when sirens call the nation for two minutes silence to mark those killed in the Holocaust. The day is a moment to reflect on the continuing research into the Nazi plan to exterminate the Jewish population of Europe. This year has seen the opening of an exhibition dedicated to the young men who ran a football league in the ghetto of Thersienstadt in the Czech Republic. This was a ghetto the Germans used to try to deceive the world about the Holocaust, where they fooled visiting Red Cross inspectors and even shot a propaganda film. Kevin Connolly is from our partner the BBC.

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The Takeaway

A Conversation with 'Maus' Creator Art Spiegelman

Friday, December 09, 2011

In 1973, Art Spiegelman published a three-page comic strip in a small underground publication called "Funny Animals." It was the first installment of what he called "Maus," the biography of Spiegelman's father, Vladek — a Holocaust survivor — with anthropomorphic mice standing in for Spiegelman, Vladek, and his fellow Jews. The complete graphic narrative was eventually published in two volumes. In 1992, nearly twenty years after he began work on the project, "Maus" was given a special award from the Pulitzer Prize Committee — to date, the only graphic novel honored by the Committee.

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The Takeaway

New Documentary Looks At Concentration Camp Excavation

Friday, November 18, 2011

In 1943, a group of Jews stood in a field in near Maidanek, a concentration camp in Poland also known as Lublin. Fearing their deaths, they burried their most prized possessions in the soil. Decades later, more than 60 years after two survivors returned to lead an excavation of the largest recovery of valuables from a death camp in history. A new documentary, called "Buried Prayers" tells the story of that event.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Art Spiegelman and Hillary Chute on MetaMaus

Thursday, October 06, 2011

Art Spiegelman revisits his Pulitzer prize–winning Maus, published 25 years ago. In MetaMaus: A Look Inside a Modern Classic, Maus, edited and based on interviews by Hillary Chute, he probes the questions that Maus most often evokes—Why the Holocaust? Why mice? Why comics?—and gives us a new and essential work about the creative process. MetaMaus includes a DVD with audio interviews with his survivor father, historical documents, and a trove of Spiegelman’s private notebooks and sketches.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Eichmann Trial

Thursday, April 14, 2011

Deborah Lipstadt, Dorot Professor of Modern Jewish History and Holocaust Studies at Emory University, talks about the capture of SS Lieutenant Colonel Adolf Eichmann by Israeli agents in Argentina in May of 1960, and how his subsequent trial in Jerusalem by an Israeli court electrified the world and sparked a public debate on where, how, and by whom Nazi war criminals should be brought to justice. The Eichmann Trial gives an overview of the trial and analyzes the dramatic effect that the survivors’ courtroom testimony had on the world.

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Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: Holding Fast

Sunday, February 27, 2011

Failing a moral test, and the cost of love and loss in stories by American and Irish contemporary writers. Those are the themes in this week's episode, which features “I Am Not a Jew” by John Biguenet (read by Denis O’Hare), and “Everything in this Country Must” by Colum McCann (read by Amy Ryan).

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Claude Lanzmann on the 25th Anniversary of “Shoah”

Friday, December 10, 2010

Claude Lanzmann, director of “Shoah,” discusses the film’s 25th anniversary. The nine-and-a-half hour landmark documentary, considered one of the greatest films ever made on the Holocaust, and it features interviews with survivors, bystanders, and perpetrators in 14 countries, and also visits places where the crimes took place. It opens in New York December 10th at Lincoln Plaza Cinemas and on December 24th at IFC Center.

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The Takeaway

Oldest Living Holocaust Survivor Turns 107, Celebrates Humanity

Friday, November 26, 2010

Alice Herz-Sommer celebrates her 107th birthday today. As if that weren't enough of a an accomplishment, she also happens to be the oldest living survivor of the Nazi Holocaust. Her love of music inspires her to live her life with optimism and faith in the human spirit, even though she lived through one of the most horriying ordeals any human can imagine. Vincent Dowd, arts correspondent for the BBC, visits Alice to hear her story.

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WNYC News

Charges Filed in Holocaust Fraud Scheme

Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Funds set up by the German government to compensate Holocaust victims were the target of a scheme that siphoned off some $42 million in phony claims. U.S. Justice Department officials have charged 17 Brooklyn residents in the operation.

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WQXR News

Israel's Holocaust Museum Gains Access to Polish Archives

Monday, September 06, 2010

WNYC

Israel's Holocaust museum, Yad Vashem, has signed an agreement with Poland to gain access to the country's World War II-era documents, according to the Associated Press.

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The Takeaway

On 65th Anniversary of Auschwitz Liberation, A Survivor Reflects

Wednesday, January 27, 2010

Today marks the 65th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz concentration camp. More than one million people were estimated to have been killed there, 90% of them Jewish.

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Studio 360

Miriam Katin

Friday, April 13, 2007

Miriam Katin was only a toddler when she and her mother hid from the Nazis in the Hungarian countryside. Now, more than 60 years later, she’s turned their harrowing story of escape and survival into a graphic memoir called We Are On Our Own. Produced by

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On Being

Elie Wiesel — The Tragedy of the Believer [remix]

Thursday, July 13, 2006

A survivor of the Holocaust, in which he lost most of his family, Wiesel is a seminal chronicler of that event and its meaning. Wiesel shares some of his thoughts on modern-day Israel and Germany, his understanding of God, and his practice of prayer after

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Studio 360

Movies and Memory

Saturday, April 06, 2002

Author and scholar Alan Mintz reveals the power films have had in shaping how we understand and interpret the Holocaust.

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Studio 360

Author Ron Rosenbaum on Art and the Holocaust

Saturday, April 06, 2002

Kurt Andersen and Ron Rosenbaum talk about how contemporary artists, writers, and filmmakers respond to the Holocaust.

Rosenbaum is the author of Explaining Hitler: The Search for the Origins of His Evil, an analysis of how writers, theologians, and filmmakers have tried to understand Hitler. He writes for The New ...

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Studio 360

Mirroring Evil

Saturday, April 06, 2002

WNYC's Sara Fishko looks at the controversial show Mirroring Evil at New York’s Jewish Museum. The exhibition features contemporary artwork about the Nazis and the Holocaust. 

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Studio 360

The Golems of Gotham

Saturday, April 06, 2002

Thane Rosenbaum's new novel The Golems of Gotham follows Oliver Levin, a mystery writer who's suddenly experiencing writers block, but who has always been emotionally blocked by the most profound mystery of his life. The character's parents survived the Holocaust, then committed suicide when Oliver was a young man. 

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On Being

Robert Pollack, Rami Nashashibi, Lisa Lampman, Leon Weinstein, and Natalie Gold — The Problem of Evil [remix]

Friday, February 15, 2002

Many around the world labeled the events of September 11 as "evil." President Bush in his recent State of the Union speech described "an axis of evil." But what does the word mean? It is a subject of enduring theological debate, even of scientific argumen

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Studio 360

Charlotte Salomon

Saturday, May 26, 2001

Charlotte Salomon's groundbreaking work is still captivating viewers nearly 60 years after her death at Auschwitz at age 26.

(Originally aired: March 24, 2001)

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Studio 360

Charlotte Salomon

Saturday, March 24, 2001

Charlotte Salomon's groundbreaking work is still captivating viewers nearly 60 years after her death at Auschwitz at age 26.

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