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Hiv Aids

WNYC News

New HIV Drug Regimen Needs More Research, But Holds Promise

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Local experts say a promising new drug regimen to fight HIV-AIDS could help prevent the virus from spreading -- and is one of the most positive developments in years.

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WNYC News

Senator Arrested in HIV/AIDS Bill Protest

Tuesday, November 09, 2010

State Senator Tom Duane and the heads of several AIDS organizations around the city blocked a stretch of Broadway near City Hall Tuesday afternoon, holding up traffic for just over 10 minutes, before being arrested by police waiting nearby.

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WNYC News

Advocates Call for Overturn of Vetoed Bill for AIDS Patients

Monday, September 20, 2010

AIDS activists descended on Gov. David Paterson's headquarters Monday morning, following the governor's weekend veto of a bill that would have helped low income tenants living with HIV and AIDS pay their rent. Now, protesters say they want state lawmakers to override the veto.

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The Takeaway

Health and Human Services Secretary Unveils New HIV/AIDS Plan

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Currently, more than 1.1 million Americans live with HIV. Every year, another 56,000 people contract the virus: a figure that has been relatively constant over the past decade. Today, the Obama administration announces a new strategy to combat this epidemic with the goal of reducing the rate of infections by 25 percent over the next five years and getting treatment to 85 percent of HIV patients within three months of their diagnosis. We talk with Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary of Health and Human Services, about the new policy.

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The Takeaway

Preaching HIV Prevention from the Pulpit

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Today, the Obama administration unveils a new plan to combat the HIV/AIDS epidemic in this country. Currently, more than 1.1 million Americans are infected with the virus, and infection rates are highest in the African-American community. African-Americans make up 12 percent of the US population, but make up more than half of new HIV/AIDS cases. It seems conventional methods of education on prevention and access to medicine are not effectively reaching this high-risk community. Many people pay attention to words from the pulpit: In some communities, the church might be the place where HIV prevention can best be taught.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

HIV and the World

Monday, June 28, 2010

In the final edition of our five-part series AIDS: Then & Now, we look at HIV around the World, and discuss how the virus has transformed lives all over the globe. Plus we’ll look at places where infection rates are changing: either raising or falling. We're joined by: Dr. Gottfried Hirnschall, Director of the HIV Department of the World Health Organization; Dr. Chris Beyrer, Professor, Department of Epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; and Gilles Van Cutsem, Medical Coordinator for Doctors without Borders.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Day-to-Day Life with HIV/AIDS

Wednesday, June 23, 2010

Over the past two decades, day-to-day live for HIV-positive individuals has changed dramatically—mostly due to a greater understanding of the virus and a powerful drug cocktail. Dr. David Ho, Scientific Director of the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center and one of the developers of the HIV drug cocktail, talks about the science of fighting HIV. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Ethical Implications of HIV/AIDS

Monday, June 21, 2010

We continue our five part series AIDS: Then & Now with a look at how ethical issues around the virus have and have not changed over the decades. We’ll talk with  Dr. Robert Klitzman, Director of the Ethics and Policy Core of the HIV Center at Columbia University, about why a number of states have statutes criminalizing HIV transmission and the recent court ruling which upholds the ban on gay men donating blood.

We continue our five part series on HIV/AIDS with a look at how ethical issues around the virus have and have not changed over the decades. We’ll examine why a number of states that have statutes criminalizing HIV transmission and the recent court ruling which upholds the ban on gay men donating blood. Plus, the ethics of disclosure for HIV+ individuals and enduring questions about just who should pay for treatment. We’ll talk with Dr. Robert Klitzman, Director of the Ethics and Policy Core of the HIV Center at Columbia University

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The Leonard Lopate Show

25+ Years of HIV/AIDS Research

Friday, June 18, 2010

In the last quarter century, research into HIV—the virus that causes AIDS—has come a long way, but not far enough. Dr. Jay A. Levy, Director of the Laboratory for Tumor and AIDS Virus Research at the University of California, San Francisco, and Dr. Robert C. Gallo, Director of the Institute of Human Virology and Division of Basic Science at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, discuss the historical scientific breakthroughs, what the latest research is finding, and how far we have to go before a vaccine or cure for HIV/AIDS is developed.

 

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The Takeaway

Zimbabwean Women Break the Stigma of HIV Through Soccer

Friday, April 23, 2010

Despite the giant strides made in recent years to provide effective drug treatments to combat HIV and AIDS, there's still a long way to go. Particularly in Africa, where the virus has hit hardest and thousands continue to die every year. One of the biggest problems in tackling the epidemic is the reluctance of those carrying the virus to come forward for testing. But an extraordinary group of women in Zimbabwe has found a new way to beat the stigma of HIV by forming a womens soccer league where all the players are HIV positive.

 

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The Takeaway

[Web Special] Crossing the Border, HIV-Positive

Tuesday, January 05, 2010

I still remember the fear that was instilled in me when I was pulled over and refused entry to the US for being HIV+, November 11, 2007.

I was interrogated, treated like a terrorist (actually the definition of terrorist is "one who instills fear to terror in others"), photographed, finger printed and run through the FBI most wanted list: all because I was supposed to know that I had to carry a medical waiver as a person who was HIV+ to enter the US, even if only for a shopping trip expected to last no longer than 3 hrs.

This not only angered me, but the event caused a major change to my life and left me restricted as to where I could go and how I could continue my HIV work with my partners in the U.S. and Tijuana, Mexico. (...continue reading)

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The Takeaway

US Lifts Restrictions on HIV+ Travelers

Tuesday, January 05, 2010

The Obama administration has lifted a ban on travellers with HIV/AIDS who wish to visit the United States. The controversial ban went into effect in 1987, when the US became one of only thirteen nations in the world to restrict HIV positive foreign visitors. Martin Rooney was turned back from the U.S. border in Western Canada in 2007, and yesterday he entered without any trouble at all. Rooney is an advocate for people living with HIV/AIDS.

(Read Rooney's account of being denied entrance to the U.S. in 2007 and his happy crossing yesterday.)

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The Takeaway

A New Hope in the Fight Against HIV?

Thursday, September 24, 2009

Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science reporter for The New York Times, joins us with a look at what could be a significant breakthrough in the fight against the spread of HIV. Researchers have announced the results of a six-year, 16,000-person study in Thailand, and it appears that an experimental HIV vaccine has cut the risk of infection by almost one-third when compared to a placebo. This is the first time a vaccine has cut the risk of infection at all.

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The Takeaway

CDC May Recommend Routine Circumcision

Tuesday, August 25, 2009

In an attempt to slow the spread of HIV, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention might begin recommending circumcisions for all infant boys. The announcement comes out of this week's National HIV Prevention Conference in Atlanta. The CDC likely won't release a formal draft of the proposal for another four to six months, but speculation on it already has emotions flaring.

For more on the debate, we are joined by Dana Goldstein, public health reporter and associate editor for The American Prospect magazine; and Dr. Roy Gulick, chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center.

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The Takeaway

New vaccine could give HIV patients an extended break from the AIDS cocktail

Wednesday, August 06, 2008

The famous AIDS cocktail, a blend of life-prolonging drugs with wicked side effects, could be a thing of the past. At this year’s International AIDS Conference, scientists announced that they are testing a vaccine designed to give HIV patients an extended break from their regular medication.

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The Takeaway

A black plague: A new report says blacks are hit hardest by AIDS

Wednesday, August 06, 2008

Last week the Black AIDS Institute, an advocacy group, reported that if Black America were its own nation it would rank 16th in the world in the number of people living with AIDS. Among its findings the report also states that nearly 600,000 blacks are living with HIV and up to 30,000 are becoming infected each year. The report provides a new perspective on the AIDS epidemic and negligence in its treatment.

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The Takeaway

A new HIV study finds rate 40 percent higher than previously estimated

Tuesday, August 05, 2008

A new CDC study finds that the annual HIV infection rate is higher than previously estimated. The country had roughly 56,300 new HIV infections in 2006 — about a 40 percent increase from the 40,000 annual estimate used for the past dozen years. What do these new numbers mean for how the community handles AIDS prevention?

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The Takeaway

Doctors talk about the state of research and treatment at AIDS conference

Tuesday, August 05, 2008

The 17th International AIDS Conference in Mexico City runs August 3 to 8, 2008. This year’s conference coincided with the startling revelation that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had underestimated new HIV cases by 40 percent.

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The Takeaway

Global AIDS conference opens in Mexico City as UN cites drop in death rate

Monday, August 04, 2008

Guest: Duncan Kennedy, BBC Correspondent in Mexico City

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