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Hiv

The Takeaway

Doctors Say They've 'Cured' A Baby Born with AIDS

Monday, March 04, 2013

A baby has been effectively cured of an infection of the AIDS virus, a disease that has shone itself to be frighteningly resilient in the face of human ingenuity. The virus has apparently been thwarted by a little baby and its doctors in Mississippi.

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The Takeaway

New Recommendations for Who Should Get Tested for HIV

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

The U.S. Preventative Services Task Force, an independent group under the Department of Health and Human Services, published new guidelines suggesting that just about everyone between the ages of 15 to 64 should be tested for HIV. Naomi Rutenberg, the vice president and director of the HIV and AIDS Program at the Population Council, explains.

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The Takeaway

Fighting AIDS from the Pulpit, Beginning With the Pastor Himself

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

The Reverend Tony Lee, the pastor of a predominantly African-American church, is doing something unique to combat the AIDS. Four times a year, on the pulpit, he has himself tested for HIV in front of his entire congregation. 

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The Takeaway

Seeking an Endgame for AIDS in Black America

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

It took a celebrity to break the silence inside black America about HIV/AIDS. The celebrity was basketball legend, Magic Johnson, who announced that he was HIV-positive back in 1991. Now a new documentary explores what it will take to end the epidemic in the African American community.

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The Takeaway

Ethical Questions Surround New At-Home HIV Test

Thursday, May 17, 2012

This week, a 17-member advisory panel to the Food and Drug Administration voted unanimously to recommend the approval of the first-ever completely in-home HIV test. But Art Caplan, professor of bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania, sees some major ethical dilemmas facing this major medical development.

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The Takeaway

Panel Endorses HIV Drug Truvada for FDA Approval

Friday, May 11, 2012

We have known about Truvada for a while. Now, an influential advisory panel of the Food and Drug Administration has endorsed the drug shown to prevent HIV infection in healthy people. It recommended approval of the pill for people at risk of contracting the virus. A final decision is expected next month, but if FDA does approve, it won't be without a degree of controversy. We're joined by Dr. Kenneth Mayer, medical research director at Fenway Health in Boston and a professor at Harvard Medical School.

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The Takeaway

The Origin of AIDS: 60 Years Before the First Documented Case

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

By most accounts, the history of AIDS begins sometime in the late 1970s, before the first official cases were diagnosed in 1981 among a handful of gay men. But a striking new book by Dr. Jacques Pépin, an infectious disease specialist at the University of Sherbrooke in Quebec, upends medical history. In "The Origins of AIDS," Pépin traces the roots of the disease back to 1921 when a handful of bush-meat hunters in Africa may have been the first to be exposed to infected chimpanzee blood.

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The Takeaway

Two Contraceptives Put Users at Greater Risk for HIV Infection

Tuesday, October 04, 2011

A study released on Monday shows that women using two popular hormonal contraceptives put themselves — and their partners — at greater risk for HIV. While this is a problem for all users of these drugs, it is particularly worrying to people in southern and eastern Africa, where these affordable and easily available contraceptives are used in a very high risk environment.

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The Takeaway

AIDS Fighting Drugs Could Prevent HIV

Thursday, July 14, 2011

Two new studies released on Wednesday show that taking a daily pill designed to fight AIDS can actually prevent an uninfected person from contracting HIV. Donald G. McNeil, Jr., science and health reporter for The New York Times, wrote about this potentially monumental find in today's paper, and has the latest on the story. 

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The Takeaway

Random-Matrix Theory Could Help Fight HIV

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Physicists used andom-matrix theory—a mathematical method for finding otherwise hidden correlations within groups of data—in the 1990s and early 2000s to predict stock market volatility. Arup Chakraborty, a chemistry and chemical engineering professor at MIT, is a researcher at the Ragon Institute in Massachusetts. Ragon and a scientific collegue used random-matrix theory to analyze enzymes, and develop new ways to treat HIV. 

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The Takeaway

Friday, June 10, 2011

Coca-Cola is available nearly everywhere in the world, including many remote places in Africa, such as throughout the landlocked country of Zambia. What if medications for HIV and malaria were as cheap, widely available and heavily distributed as Coke? That's the thinking behind ColaLife, a project founded by Simon Berry, who has been an aid worker in Africa for years. Berry speaks with us about his organization.

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The Takeaway

Good News in HIV Protection, But More Trials Necessary

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

The International AIDS conference in Vienna is underway and there's excitement about a new study showing that there may be a new effective microbicide to help prevent against HIV infection. Science Magazine correspondent, Jon Cohen is at the conference. He says that the microbicide is not ready for general use and that more trials are needed. He also says that this is part of a combination prevention and that condoms and behavioral change are still necessary.

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The Takeaway

New Hope in Reducing Rate of HIV Infections in Women

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

There's good news in the fight against HIV. A new South African study has found that a microbicide gel containing the antiretroviral medication, Tenofovir can significantly reduce the rate of HIV infections. The study included almost 900 volunteers and showed that the gel cut a woman's chances of being infected by 50 percent after the first year.

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The Takeaway

A Major Health Scare for Missouri Veterans

Thursday, July 01, 2010

A St. Louis veterans hospital may have infected thousands of its patients with HIV and hepatitis. The Department of Veterans Affairs mailed letters out to 1,812 veterans, warning them they may potentially be infected, because dental equipment "may not have been cleaned correctly" at the clinic at the John Cochran hospital.

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WNYC News

City Tests New Approach to HIV Screening

Thursday, November 26, 2009

Newly infected people with HIV are much more contagious than people who’ve had the disease for a while. That's because, in the first months after infection, they don’t yet have antibodies fighting and reducing the virus.

The city estimates there are almost 5,000 new HIV infections each year, but detecting ...

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