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Mary Hamilton, The Woman Who Put The 'Miss' In Court

Friday, July 12, 2013

Mary Hamilton, a field secretary for the Congress of Racial Equality, was arrested at an Alabama protest and refused to answer the judge unless he called her "Miss." It was custom for white people to get honorifics, but black people were called by first names.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Dancing in the Street, Activist Song

Friday, July 12, 2013

Mark Kurlansky tells how the song “Dancing in the Street” became an anthem for a changing America. It was released in the summer of 1964—the time of the Mississippi Freedom Summer, the Berkeley Free Speech Movement, the beginning of the Vietnam War, the passage of the Civil Rights Act, and the lead-up to a dramatic election. Kurlansky’s book Ready for a Brand New Beat explains how “Dancing in the Street” became an activist anthem.

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Death And Tax Evasion: The Strange Case Of Sergei Magnitsky

Thursday, July 11, 2013

The whistle-blowing lawyer was found guilty by a Russian court even though he died in prison in 2009. The case seemingly was a first for Russia, but putting the dead on trial isn't entirely unprecedented in history.

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Royals In Nappies: A Family Album

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

The photographers are already camping out ahead of the expected birth this month of Britain's third in line to the throne. As we wait for that highly anticipated first photo, here's a look back at a few other babies who made a royal entrance.

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Rodriguez Kept 'Mexican Repatriation' From Being Forgotten

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Historian Raymond Rodriguez, who chronicled the deportation of numerous American citizens in the 1930s, recently died at the age of 87.

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Farming Got Hip In Iran Some 12,000 Years Ago, Ancient Seeds Reveal

Monday, July 08, 2013

Archaeologists had considered Iran unimportant in the history of farming – until now. Ancient seeds and farming tools uncovered in Iran reveal Stone Age people there were growing lentils, barley and other crops. The findings offer a snapshot of a time when humans first started experimenting with farming.

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How 'Dancing In The Street' Became A Protest Anthem

Sunday, July 07, 2013

Mark Kurlansky's book Ready for a Brand New Beat is a history of the song "Dancing in the Street." It was the soundtrack for the summer of 1964, when race riots and war protests spread across the United States.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Movies, Magic, and Memoir

Friday, July 05, 2013

New Yorker writer Margaret Talbot uses the life and career of her father, Lyle Talbot, an early Hollywood star, to tell the story of the rise of popular culture. The Entertainer: Movies, Magic, and My Father’s Twentieth Century is a combination of Hollywood history, social history, and family memoir, conjures nostalgia for those earlier eras of 1910s and 1920s small-town America, and the 1930s and 1940s in Hollywood.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Alan Alda; Our American Revolution; They Might Be Giants

Friday, July 05, 2013

Today's show is a best-of, so we won't be taking any calls. But the comments page is always open!

Actor Alan Alda talks about his career and his interest in science and medicine – particularly dyslexia. Then, the rock band They Might Be Giants perform in studio and talk about how to navigate the music business in the age of the Internet. Plus, author Isabel Allende on her new novel; an anthropologist makes the case that sanitation workers are the city’s heroes; the Black Fives and Brooklyn’s basketball past; and the local history of the American Revolution.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Doors' Drummer John Densmore; the True Story Behind "The Searchers"; a Life in the Movies; Aaron Neville

Friday, July 05, 2013

John Densmore talks about being the drummer in The Doors and the conflicts that grew along with the band’s success. We’ll look at how the story of Cynthia Ann Parker has inspired operas, plays, and John Ford’s classic movie “The Searchers.” New Yorker writer Margaret Talbot tells us about the life and career of her father Lyle Talbot, a star during the early days of Hollywood. Plus, Aaron Neville on the release of his latest recording “My True Story.”

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Searchers, an American Legend

Friday, July 05, 2013

Glenn Frankel tells the story behind “The Searchers.” In 1836 in East Texas, nine-year-old Cynthia Ann Parker was kidnapped by Comanches, raised by the tribe, and eventually became the wife of a warrior. Twenty-four years later she was reclaimed by the U.S. cavalry and Texas Rangers and reunited with her white family. It’s become a foundational American tale and has inspired operas plays, and a novel by Alan LeMay, which was adapted into one of Hollywood's most legendary films, “The Searchers,” directed by John Ford and starring John Wayne. In The Searchers: The Making of an American Legend, Frankel examines how the story has been shaped over time.

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How Slavery Almost Made It Into The Declaration

Thursday, July 04, 2013

More than any other day of the year, the Fourth of July is a time to take pride in American history. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks to author Kenneth C. Davis about what you shouldn't forget this Independence Day.

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Celebrating The Expansion Of Our Nation

Thursday, July 04, 2013

On July 4, 1803, President Thomas Jefferson announced the signing of the Louisiana Purchase, when the United States bought more than 800,000 square miles of land from the French. On this anniversary, guest host Celeste Headlee highlights some of the forgotten history around the purchase.

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The Takeaway

Rare Printing of the Declaration of Independence Sold

Thursday, July 04, 2013

You would never guess that the newspaper business was struggling, at least not if you were at an auction in New York City last week where a newspaper printing was sold for $550,000. But this isn't just any newspaper printing. It's a rare edition of the first newspaper printing of the Declaration of Independence. Seth Kaller is a leading expert in acquiring, authenticating and appraising American historic documents and artifacts. He partnered with the Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries to auction off this rare piece of American history. Seth Kaller joins us on the program to talk about this rare document and its significance.

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History Buffs Commemorate 150 Years Since Gettysburg Battle

Thursday, July 04, 2013

This week marks the 150th anniversary of the battle of Gettysburg. While it's widely known as the critical turning point of the Civil War, the small Pennsylvania town has seen many other battles since then — over how the historic site should be preserved and remembered.

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For 'Star-Spangled Banner,' A Long Road From Song To Anthem

Thursday, July 04, 2013

Francis Scott Key wrote the words to the ballad after witnessing the Battle for Baltimore in 1814. According to author Steve Vogel, after it was published, Key's composition took the country by storm. But it didn't become the national anthem until more than 100 years later.

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Leaders Draw Different Messages From Battle Of Gettysburg

Wednesday, July 03, 2013

Robert Siegel speaks with Gary Gallagher, history professor at the University of Virginia and Civil War historian, about how Gettysburg has been marked over the years by different presidents and communities.

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Gettysburg Swells As Throngs Mark Civil War's Turning Point

Wednesday, July 03, 2013

The small town of Gettysburg, Pa., has rolled out the red carpet for tens of thousands of visitors this week. The town hopes the tourists, descending to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, will mean a $100 million boost to the local economy.

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Civil War Soldiers Needed Bravery To Face The Foe, And The Food

Wednesday, July 03, 2013

Tooth-breaking crackers infested with bugs. Ramrod rolls cooked on gun parts. Fake coffee made of peanuts and chicory. At Gettysburg and elsewhere, the rations faced by soldiers on both sides of the Civil War would make most of us want to surrender in dismay.

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Martin Luther King's Memory Inspires Teenage Dream

Wednesday, July 03, 2013

Martin Luther King Junior's famous "I Have a Dream" speech is fifty years old this summer. Tell Me More is asking listeners to use #MyDream on Twitter to share their own wishes and visions of the future. Fourteen-year-old Aubrey Moran from Mississippi shares her dream for kids her age.

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