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Are There 'Blurred Lines' Over Summer's Hottest Song?

Friday, August 23, 2013

Robin Thicke may have the hit song of the summer, but Marvin Gaye's family says it sounds too familiar — like the melody in Gaye's "Got to Give It Up." Both sides are lawyering up, and the Barbershop guys weigh in on the dustup.

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Renowned Kung Fu Master Inspires Slew Of Action Flicks

Friday, August 23, 2013

The life story of Ip Man, Bruce Lee's late martial arts teacher, has been a popular subject in Chinese-language films and television. The kung fu master has been the focus of five films in the past five years, including The Grandmaster, which opens in select U.S. theaters on Friday.

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At 16, Making A Trek To Make The '63 March On Washington

Friday, August 23, 2013

Lawrence Cumberbatch's parents thought their 16-year-old son was too young to walk from Brooklyn to the March on Washington in 1963. And enlisting Lawrence's uncle to dissuade him didn't have quite the effect they had hoped for, Lawrence tells his son, Simeon.

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The Takeaway

The End of an Era: Final Set of Nixon Tapes Released

Thursday, August 22, 2013

On Wednesday, the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum released the last set of secret recordings from the 37th president. The 340 hours of tape cover April 9th through July 12th, 1973, a period of some success and serious turmoil in the Nixon Administration, according to Luke Nichter, professor of history at Texas A&M University-Central Texas and manager of the website Nixontapes.org. Nichter joins The Takeaway to discuss the historic tapes.

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Reviving An Heirloom Corn That Packs More Flavor And Nutrition

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Imagine corn on the cob that naturally tastes creamy and buttery — no added fat required. Native Americans bred such a variety, but its kernels were almost lost to history. Now one chef is bringing back the heirloom corn — and hoping it will serve as a lesson in what can happen when crops are bred to be flavorful and colorful, not just big.

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John F. Kennedy Faced Civil Rights Opponents In His Own Party

Thursday, August 22, 2013

One aim of the organizers of the 1963 March on Washington was to get Congress to pass civil rights legislation. President John F. Kennedy had proposed a wide-ranging measure earlier that summer. But he faced unrelenting opposition from lawmakers, many in his own party.

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Stone Age Chefs Spiced Up Food Even 6,000 Years Ago

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Looks like our prehistoric ancestors were bigger foodies than we realized. Archaeologists have found evidence that hunter-gatherers added a hot, mustard spice to their fish and meat thousands of years ago. So meals weren't just about consuming calories. Taste and flavor were important, too.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

"I Have A Dream" 50 Years Later

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Taylor Branch, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and author of The King Years: Historic Moments in the Civil Rights Movement (Simon & Schuster), joins us to look back on the 50 years of civil rights history since the March on Washington.

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Radiolab

Sink Your Teeth Into Our Rabies Quiz

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Did you know the phrase "hair of the dog" comes from an old remedy for rabies? Take our rabies quiz for more factoids on the deadly virus.
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Summer Of '63: Old Lessons For A New Movement

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Today's undocumented activists are using strategies borrowed from the civil rights movement and calling their struggle "The Civil Rights Movement of the 21st Century."

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Playwright August Wilson In 'Another League'

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright August Wilson was best known for a series of 10 plays - one for every decade - depicting African-American life in the 20th century. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks to director Kenny Leon and actress Phylicia Rashad, about breathing new life into the series.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Untold Story of the Notorious Milgram Psychology Experiments

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Psychologist Gina Perry tells the full story of a controversial experiment by psychologist Stanley Milgram and its repercussions. In the summer of 1961, Milgram invited volunteers to take part in an experiment at Yale, and he reported that 65 percent of the volunteers had repeatedly administered electric shocks of increasing strength to a man they believed to be in severe pain, even suffering a life-threatening heart condition, because they had been ordered to by an authority figure. In Behind the Shock Machine: The Untold Story of the Notorious Milgram Psychology Experiments, Perry interviewed the original participants—many of whom remain haunted about what they did—and pieces together a more complex—and more troubling—picture of these experiments and what they reveal about us.

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At 1963 March, A Face In The Crowd Became A Poster Child

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

When she was just 12, Edith Lee-Payne's face was immortalized in an iconic photo from the March on Washington. Decades would pass before Payne learned that her image has been used as part of documentaries, books, calendars and exhibits about the history of the civil rights movement.

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Museum Raises Money To Save 'Rosie The Riveter' Plant

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

A Michigan aviation museum has until Oct. 1 to save a historic factory from the wrecking ball. The Yankee Air Museum still needs to raise more than $3 million to rebuild part of the huge Willow Run bomber plant, where Rosie the Riveter worked during World War II. (This piece initially aired on Aug, 4. 2013, on All Things Considered)

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Universe in the Rearview Mirror

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

Physicist Dave Goldberg explains symmetry in physics, and tells the story of a holocaust escapee named Emmy Noether whose theorem relating conservation laws to symmetries is widely regarded to be as important as Einstein’s notion of the speed of light. But because she was a woman, she was unrecognized, even unpaid, throughout most of her career. In The Universe in the Rearview Mirror Goldberg makes science comprehensible, relatable, and gripping. 

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English Debate What To Do With Richard III's Remains

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

More than 500 years after the Wars of the Roses, the English are again fighting over Richard the Third. Archaeologists from the University of Leicester last year unearthed his remains under a parking lot in the city. Leicester Cathedral has earmarked more than a million pounds to give him a proper burial. But not so fast say the people of York.

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Faith Ringgold: No 'Knock Down, Drag Out Black Woman Story'

Monday, August 19, 2013

The legendary artist began her career in 1963, the same year as the March on Washington. She talks to guest host Celeste Headlee about her life, work, and why no one originally wanted to hear her story.

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'Lawrence' Of Arabia: From Archaeologist To War Hero

Monday, August 19, 2013

T.E. Lawrence, the British officer who played a key role in the Middle East during World War I, served as one of that war's few romantic champions. Scott Anderson's Lawrence in Arabia explains how Lawrence used his knowledge of Arab culture and medieval history to advance British causes.

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Not Just A 'Black Thing': An Asian-American's Bond With Malcolm X

Monday, August 19, 2013

Yuri Kochiyama's family was part of a generation that was rounded up by the American government and forced to live behind barbed wire during World War II. Her later chance encounter with Malcolm X in 1963 sparked a friendship that helped inspire a lifelong commitment to activism.

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Killed For Taking Part In 'Everybody's Fight'

Sunday, August 18, 2013

This summer, NPR is airing several reports looking at watershed moments in the Civil Rights movement. Several Civil Rights advocates who died pursuing equality left behind devastated families, especially children. While immensely proud of their parents, many report it was a struggle to grow up in the shadow of a martyred hero. This story originally aired on All Things Considered on Aug. 12, 2013.

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