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History

The Takeaway

Congress, The President and War: A History

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

While the United States has entered a great many conflicts in its 237 years, Congress has only declared war only 11 times. As President Obama seeks to convince members of the 113th Congress to intervene in Syria, Jennifer Weber, professor of history at the University of Kansas, explores the legislative and executive branches' historical relationship with war. 

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Diana Nyad: Dream Accomplished

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

Diana Nyad became the first person to swim from Cuba to Florida without the help of a shark cage. This was Nyad's fifth attempt and it took her 53 hours. Host Michel Martin spoke with her three years ago, about not giving up.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Robert Sullivan's American Revolution

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

Robert Sullivan looks at the role New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania played in the American Revolutionary War. He talks about his adventure re-creating a heroic part of the past in the urban, suburban, and sometimes even rural landscape of today. In his book My American Revolution: Crossing the Delaware and I-78, Sullivan sets off on a personal odyssey that involves camping in New Jersey backyards, hiking through lost “mountains,” and traveling from Brooklyn to Manhattan by handmade boat.

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Life of the Law

Judging Steinbeck’s Lennie

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

In 2002, the Supreme Court ruled that it is unconstitutional to execute people with mental disabilities. But the Court left it up to individual states to define mentally disabled. After the Texas legislature failed to agree on a definition,

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The FBI's War on Student Radicals, and Reagan's Rise to Power

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

Investigative reporter Seth Rosenfeld traces the FBI’s secret involvement with three iconic figures who clashed at Berkeley during the 1960s: the ambitious neophyte politician Ronald Reagan, the fierce but fragile radical Mario Savio, and the liberal university president Clark Kerr. Subversives: The FBI's War on Student Radicals, and Reagan's Rise to Power looks at the campus counterculture and reveals how the FBI’s covert operations—led by Reagan’s friend J. Edgar Hoover—helped ignite an era of protest, undermine the Democrats, and benefit Reagan personally and politically.

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For F. Scott And Zelda Fitzgerald, A Dark Chapter In Asheville, N.C.

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

The Golden 1920s couple didn't fare as well in the 1930s, and the North Carolina mountain town was host to a particularly sad time. NPR's Susan Stamberg discovered a little-known story of the Jazz Age darlings and their devastating connections to Asheville.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Latinos in America; Lee Child's Jack Reacher Novels; the Revolution in NY and NJ; the FBI and Reagan at Berkeley

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

Journalist Ray Suarez describes the role Latinos have played in shaping the nation for over 500 years. Lee Childs talks about his latest Jack Reacher novel, called Never Go Back. Robert Sullivan shines a light on the often overlooked roles that New Jersey and New York played in the American Revolution. And we’ll hear about FBI surveillance, illegal break-ins, infiltration, planted news stories, and poison-pen letters at Berkeley in the 1960s.

Tlacoyos: A Mexican Grilled Snack That Tempted The Conquistadors

Monday, September 02, 2013

Tlacoyos are a doughy corn tortilla of sorts that's cooked on a grill. Whether enjoyed on a plastic plate as street food or fine china in a high-end restaurant, it's been a favorite snack for centuries.

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Paris Has Been A Haven For African Americans Escaping Racism

Monday, September 02, 2013

The City Of Lights became known as a beacon of freedom and tolerance for African Americans. Paris is rich in black history — especially from black Americans who have flocked there since the 19th century.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Fever, a Novel about Typhoid Mary

Monday, September 02, 2013

Mary Beth Keane discusses her new novel, Fever, about the woman known as “Typhoid Mary”—Mary Mallon. She was in Irish immigrant who became a cook for some of New York's wealthiest families until someone noticed that she left a trail of disease wherever she cooked. The Department of Health sent Mallon to North Brother Island, where she was kept in isolation from 1907 to 1910, then released under the condition that she never work as a cook again.

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Declassified Documents Reveal CIA Role In 1953 Iranian Coup

Sunday, September 01, 2013

The CIA's overthrow of Prime Minister Mohammad Mossadegh was a first for the agency and served as the template for covert operations across the globe.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Last of the Doughboys

Friday, August 30, 2013

Richard Rubin talks about finding and interviewing living American World War I veterans, aged 101 to 113, to capture their life stories before they died. The Last of the Doughboys is his decade-long odyssey to recover the stories of a forgotten generation and their experience in the Great War

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Ancient Beads with an Otherworldly Origin

Friday, August 30, 2013

Researchers analyzed ancient Egyptian iron beads fashioned out of meteoric iron and crafted 2,000 years before the Iron Age. Archaeometallurgist Thilo Rehren discusses how the beads were made before the prevalence of iron mining and smelting.

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Evangelicals' New Chief Says Days Of Moral Majority Over

Friday, August 30, 2013

Russell Moore is considered the public face of Evangelical Christians, as the new leader of the Southern Baptist Convention's Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission. Moore speaks with host Michel Martin about what it will take to bridge the racial gap in the Church and deal with some hot-button topics like immigration and abortion.

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Does The NFL's Proposed Settlement Change The Game?

Friday, August 30, 2013

The National Football League has agreed to pay hundreds of millions of dollars in a settlement over concussion-related injuries. But the league also denies any wrongdoing. So is it a victory for the players? The Barbershop guys weigh in.

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The Takeaway

The Dreams of the Undocumented Community

Friday, August 30, 2013

Jose Antonio Vargas is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and Founder of Define America. He says that while there are obvious differences between the civil rights struggles of African Americans 50 years ago and those of undocumented immigrants today, he draws inspiration from their struggles and sees points of commonality.

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Does 'Marching' Digitally Send A Message?

Thursday, August 29, 2013

As thousands of people gathered in the nation's capital to mark the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, many more activists participated online. Host Michel Martin talks about social justice in the digital age with Michael Skolnik of Global Grind and Corey Dade of The Root.

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Move Over, Pot Stickers: China Cooks Up Hundreds Of Dumplings

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Dumplings are a huge part of Chinese culinary tradition, and restaurants there cater to the nation's obsession with a dazzlingly array of dumpling shapes and fillings, including green frogs stuffed with bullfrog meat and a flock of birds filled with roasted Beijing duck.

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Obama Encourages Next Generation To Carry On King's Vision

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Freedom bells rang out in Washington and across the country on Wednesday, as Americans marked the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech. President Obama, who's often noted his own debt to the civil rights leader, praised the tens of thousands of Americans who marched with Dr. King in 1963. He also challenged a new generation to continue to press for racial and economic justice.

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Joining The '63 March, Despite Parents' Racial Biases

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Maury Landsman's parents stayed home on Aug. 28, 1963. Their liquor store, like all others in the nation's capital, was shuttered the day of the March on Washington and the couple had no interest in attending. But Landsman, then 20, felt strongly that he needed to be there.

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