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History

Where Do 'Hoodlums' Come From? San Francisco

Wednesday, November 06, 2013

The unexpected story of how the "young men and lads" who "commit acts of violence and mischief" came to be known as hoodlums. The term was first widely used in the 1870s in San Francisco, where gangs often targeted Chinese immigrants.

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Life of the Law

Justices on the Move

Wednesday, November 06, 2013

It’s hard to imagine Supreme Court Justices working outside of Washington, D.C. But for the first half of our country’s history, they spent much of their time traveling as circuit court judges. And it may have made them better Supreme Court justices.

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Does Equal Justice For All Include The Poor?

Tuesday, November 05, 2013

The U.S. Department of Justice recently announced $6.7 million in grants to provide more legal defense services for the indigent. But will the money really help with what some critics call overworked, underpaid, and poorly trained public defenders? Host Michel Martin asks law professor Eve Primus and Jonathan Rapping of Gideon's Promise.

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How'd They Do That? The Story Of A Giant Rock And A Road Of Ice

Monday, November 04, 2013

Huge stone slabs weighing up to 300 tons that now reside in Beijing's Forbidden City were slid more than 40 miles in 15th- and 16th-century China over water-lubricated ice roads in the dead of winter. Though spoked wheels had been around for almost 3,000 years, the ice roads were smoother and required less manpower.

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Teddy Roosevelt's 'Bully Pulpit' Isn't The Platform It Once Was

Monday, November 04, 2013

Roosevelt described the power of the presidency to shape public opinion as "the bully pulpit." That's also the title of a new book from presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, in which she explains the unique relationships Roosevelt forged with reporters.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Shahan Mufti on His 1,400-Year Family History

Monday, November 04, 2013

Journalist Shahan Mufti tells his family’s history, which he can trace back 1,400 years to the inner circle of the prophet Muhammad. He offers a history of Pakistan by using the stories of his ancestors, many of whom served as judges and jurists in Muslim sharia courts of South Asia for many centuries. The Faithful Scribe is more than a personal history—it reveals the deepest roots of Islamic civilization in Pakistan.

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Far From Diwali's Lights, The Warm Glow Of Home

Sunday, November 03, 2013

South Asian communities around the world are celebrating good over evil, knowledge over ignorance, light over darkness. Sunday is Diwali, the Hindu Festival of Lights. The holiday isn't well-known in the U.S., though, so families rely on themselves to keep the tradition alive.

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Scientist's Scuba Trip Sparks Search For 'Vanished' WWII Plane

Sunday, November 03, 2013

On Sept. 1, 1944, a B-24 bomber went down in the South Pacific. The wreckage, and the airmen, seemed to disappear. Almost 50 years later, a scientist on vacation in Palau found an airplane wing and went on an obsessive, decade-long quest to find what happened to the plane. Author Wil S. Hylton joins NPR to discuss his new book on the mystery.

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Five Minutes With First Black Man To Play For The NBA

Saturday, November 02, 2013

This week marks the 63rd anniversary of the day Earl Lloyd took the court for the Washington Capitols. We got him on the phone for a quick chat.

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Hitler's Gestapo Chief Lies In Jewish Cemetery, Scholar Says

Thursday, October 31, 2013

The fate of Nazi war criminal Heinrich Mueller, who led Adolf Hitler's Gestapo, has long been a mystery. A historian says he's traced Mueller to a Jewish cemetery in Berlin. If confirmed, the discovery would end 68 years of uncertainty about the man who ran the secret police.

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Does The Word "Redskins" Cause Psychological Damage?

Thursday, October 31, 2013

Members of the Oneida Nation met with representatives from the NFL on Wednesday to discuss the growing call to change the Washington Redskins name. Host Michel Martin finds out how the meeting went from the Nation's representative, Ray Halbritter.

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The Secret, Steamy History Of Halloween Apples

Thursday, October 31, 2013

A Halloween apple was once a powerful symbol of fertility and immortality. In Europe and the early years of America, girls used apples and apple peels to divine their romantic destiny.

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75 Years Ago, 'War Of The Worlds' Started A Panic. Or Did It?

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

On the evening of Oct. 30, 1938, Orson Welles and his troupe went on the air to say that Martians had invaded New Jersey. Ever since, stories have made it sound as if the broadcast caused a mass panic. But that might not have been the case.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Rent Control and A Year After Sandy

Monday, October 28, 2013

Robert Fogelson tells the history of rent wars in New York and the invention of rent control. And we'll look at how Sandy has changed the city.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Rent Wars and the History of Rent Control in New York

Monday, October 28, 2013

Robert M. Fogelson tells the fascinating but little-known story of the battles between landlords and tenants in New York from 1917 through 1929. His book The Great Rent Wars: New York, 1917-1929traces the tumultuous history of rent control in New York from its inception to its expiration as it unfolded in New York, Albany, and Washington, D.C. Fogelson also explores the heated debates over landlord-tenant law, housing policy, and other issues that are as controversial today as they were a century ago.

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The Takeaway

Noise: The Defining Sounds From Human History

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

History is visual: You can see a photo from a century ago, visit a room filled with artifacts, and even gaze at paintings in an ancient cave where humans stood 30,000 ago. But what would it sound like to live in those times? David Hendy has a good idea. He is a professor of media and communication at the University of Sussex, and he's in love with noise—but not in the way you might think.

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The Takeaway

Henry Louis Gates Jr. on 500 Years of African American History

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

The newest documentary by Dr. Henry Louis Gates Jr., “The African Americans,” examines five centuries of African American history—from the first black conquistador to arrive in what's now America to the election of President Barack Obama. The series explores the evolution of the African American people, as well as the cultural institutions, political strategies, and religious and social perspectives they developed against unimaginable odds.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

An Alternate Kennedy History; NJ Property Taxes; Henry Louis Gates

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

This year is the 50th anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy. In his new book, Jeff Greenfield considers an alternate history of the Cold War if Kennedy had lived, and news of the day. Plus: Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates stops by to talk about this new PBS series, “The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross”, and how history can inform our understanding of current events. And reporter Matt Katz discusses New Jersey property taxes as part of our “30 Issues in 30 Days” election series.

The Brian Lehrer Show

If Kennedy Lived

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

As the 50th anniversary of the Kennedy assassination nears, Jeff Greenfield, longtime news analyst and correspondent, talks current politics and offers another "alternate history" of the Cold War in his new novel If Kennedy Lived: The First and Second Terms of President John F. Kennedy: An Alternate History (Putnam, 2013).

Event: Jeff Greenfield | 92nd St Y 8:15 pm | Information

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The Takeaway

Retro Report: The True Story Behind the Spilled McDonald's Coffee Lawsuit

Monday, October 21, 2013

The Takeaway travels back in time with our friends at Retro Report, a documentary team focused on shedding new light on stories from the news archives. Today’s report takes us back to 1992 when 79-year-old Stella Liebeck of Albuquerque, New Mexico, ordered a fateful cup of coffee from a McDonald's drive-through. Lieback's coffee spilled onto her lap, and she sued the fast food chain. Retro Report producer Bonnie Bertram reflects on the case, and explains the details of her investigations.

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