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History

Marking Kennedy Assassination, Dallas Still On 'Eggshells'

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Dallas became known as the "City of Hate" after President John F. Kennedy was killed there. But the city has changed, and it hopes that the 50th anniversary of the assassination on Friday will be a chance to show the extent of that transformation.

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Moved By Kennedy's Death, The Boston Symphony Played On

Thursday, November 21, 2013

The orchestra was mid-performance when news of the president's assassination reached the symphony hall in 1963. The musicians had to decide: suspend the concert or continue? Their decision transformed a moment of shock into a moment of shared consolation.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

On the Trail of Genghis Khan

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Tim Cope tells us about traveling on horseback across the entire length of the Eurasian steppe, from Karakorum, the ancient capital of Mongolia, through Kazakhstan, Russia, Crimea, and the Ukraine to the Danube River in Hungary. He writes about the journey, which was inspired by the nomadic life of the Mongols, in On the Trail of Genghis Khan.

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Soul Food For Thanksgiving: Mac And Cheese, 'Red Drink,' And More

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Chitlins, black-eyed peas and sweet potato greens ... it's all soul food you might want to consider adding to your Thanksgiving table. Host Michel Martin hears about the history of soul food — and gets some recipes — from Adrian Miller, author of Soul Food: The Surprising Story of An American Cuisine One Plate At A Time.

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The Takeaway

Witness to History On JFK's Death

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Reporter Hugh Aynesworth was on the scene that day in Dallas when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. Aynesworth says that the 50 years of conspiracy theories conjured by Kennedy's death have gotten it all wrong. His mission is to set the record straight with good, old fashion reporting. He is author of “November 22, 1963: Witness to History,” and he joins The Takeaway to discuss his memories of that day in Dallas 50 years ago.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Kennedy Aides Remember the 1963 Assassinaton

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Members of the Kennedy Administration remember the president they served and his untimely death 50 years ago.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Philip Shenon on a Secret History of the Kennedy Assassination

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

November 22 marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President Kennedy, and questions have haunted our nation since: Was there a single gunman? Was Lee Harvey Oswald part of a conspiracy? Did the Warren Commission discover the whole truth of what happened? Investigative journalist Philip Shenon looks into these questions and provides many of the answers. His book A Cruel and Shocking Act: A Secret History of the Kennedy Assassination discloses information that was withheld from the Warren Commission by the CIA, FBI and others in power in Washington. Shenon also argues that Chief Justice Earl Warren was more committed to protecting the Kennedy family than getting to the full truth about what happened on that tragic day.

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Radiolab

An Ice-Cold Case

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Scientists' obsession with one particular man - and with the tiny scraps of evidence left in the wake of his death - gives us a surprisingly intimate peek into the life of someone who should've been lost to the ages.

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'Coolie Woman' Rescues Indentured Women From Anonymity

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

When slavery was outlawed in the Caribbean, indentured servitude took over. Host Michel Martin speaks with author Gauitra Bahadur. Her book Coolie Woman traces her great-grandmother's roots from India to Guyana.

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The Takeaway

The Unfinished Work of the Gettysburg Address

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

The Gettysburg Address is one of the most famous speeches in our nation's history. But looking back on the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address, we must ask if the nation is living up to the ideals set forth by Abraham Lincoln. Are we a union? Or just as troubled and divided as a nation at war? Drew Gilpin Faust, president of Harvard University, historian and author of "This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War," explains what unfinished work remains 150 years after the Gettysburg Address.

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Life of the Law

Water Rights

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

When a serious drought hit just months after an Oregon court awarded senior water rights to the Klamath Tribes, the tribe made a ‘call’ for water. The call meant enough water in its rivers and streams to keep the Upper Klamath Lake full,

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The Takeaway

Dozens Dead at Iranian Embassy in Beirut | Selfie Named Word of the Year | The Unfinished Work of the Gettysburg Address

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Sen. Angus King Urges Capitol Hill to Come Together | Bombs Leave Dozens Dead at Iranian Embassy in Beirut | Selfie Named Word of the Year by Oxford Dictionaries | Midwest Storms Leave Behind Path of Destruction | The Future of Pharmacies & Lethal Injections in Missouri | Learning About Life from"Time ...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Ari Shavit's Promised Land

Monday, November 18, 2013

Haaretz columnist Ari Shavit looks at Israel's past and present dilemmas in My Promised Land.

 

 

 

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Features

Mallomars: The Cookie Everyone Likes To Hoard

Sunday, November 17, 2013

The mystique of Mallomars dates back to iceboxes and seasonal scarcity. Despite advances in modern refrigeration, people still stock up on the s'more-like cookies to tide them through the summer.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: Kitchen Tools

Friday, November 15, 2013

All living things need to eat, but only humans cook...and how we cook has evolved and grown more sophisticated since our earliest days. We have nonstick skillets, automatic espresso machines, digital meat thermometers, and high-speed blenders. But in our earliest days, we didn't even have pots to cook in. On this week’s Please Explain, Bee Wilson, author of Consider the Fork: A History of How We Cook and Eat, tells us all about the history of our cooking tools—when and how they were invented and how they’ve changed the foods we make.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Doris Kearns Goodwin on The Bully Pulpit

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Pulitzer-Prize-winning author Doris Kearns Goodwin talks about the intense friendship of Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft — a close relationship that ruptured in 1912, when they engage in a fight for the presidential nomination that divides their wives, their children, and their closest friends, and had vast political repercussions.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The 2,000-Year History of Paper

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Nicholas A. Basbanes talks about paper—from its invention in China 2000 years ago through all of its uses to record history, make laws, conduct business, and establish identities. In On Paper: The Everything of Its Two-Thousand-Year History, Basbanes looks at paper’s important role in the world and historical events such as the Stamp Act of 1765, the Zimmerman Telegram that led to America’s entry into World War I, the Alger Hiss spy case, the Pentagon Papers, and Watergate.

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The Takeaway

An Inside Look & First Hand Account of The Warren Commission

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Howard Willens went to work on the Warren Commission a week after President John F. Kennedy's assassination as a senior staff attorney. He is the author of the new book "History Will Prove us Right," which defends the findings of the commission that concluded Lee Harvey Oswald was the lone gunman, and that Jack Ruby, who killed Oswald two days later, also acted alone. Willens joins The Takeaway to provide an inside look and first hand account of the Warren Commission.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Doris Kearns Goodwin's The Bully Pulpit; History of Paper; "In No Great Hurry"; Ethanol Production

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin talks about the intense relationship between Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft, a friendship became a rivalry in the 1912 election. We’ll look at how the invention of paper 2,000 years ago has shaped civilizations ever since. Tomas Leach talks about his documentary, “In No Great Hurry,” about the photographer Saul Leiter. And we’ll examine the ecological and economic costs of ethanol production.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Explorers, Inventors, Eccentrics and Mavericks, who United the Nation

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Simon Winchester explains how America became “one nation, indivisible.” What unified a growing number of disparate states into the modern country we recognize today? His book The Men Who United the States: Explorers, Inventors, Eccentrics and Mavericks, and the Creation of One Nation, Indivisible explores this question, and follows America’s most essential explorers, thinkers, and innovators, and builders who played a pivotal role in creating today’s United States.

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