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History

Upset Over Divisive Political Culture? Blame Burke And Paine

Tuesday, December 03, 2013

Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep talks to writer Yuval Levin about the origins of the American political right and left. In his new book The Great Debate, Levin traces the birth of the left/right divide to the views of two men: Edmund Burke and Thomas Paine.

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Florida Tribe Re-Creates Daring Escape From The Trail Of Tears

Monday, December 02, 2013

More than 150 years ago, Polly Parker, a Seminole Indian, organized and led an escape from federal troops who were deporting Indians to the West. Parker traveled through hundreds of miles of wilderness to get back to tribal lands. The tribe is marking the event by following that dangerous journey.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Nikolai Rezanov's Dream of a Russian America

Monday, December 02, 2013

The Russian Empire once extended deep into America: in 1818 Russia’s furthest outposts were in California and Hawaii. The dreamer behind this great Imperial vision was Nikolai Rezanov – diplomat, adventurer, courtier, millionaire and gambler. In Glorious Misadventures: Nikolai Rezanov and the Dream of a Russian America, Owen Matthews gives an account of Rezanov’s quest to plant Russian colonies from Siberia to California led him to San Francisco.

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In Gujarat, Anti-Muslim Legacy Of 2002 Riots Still Looms

Sunday, December 01, 2013

Indian writer Zahir Janmohamed was in Gujarat, India, during the 2002 riots that left more than a thousand Muslims dead. He talks with NPR's Rachel Martin about the riots, and how Muslims have fared in Gujarat since then under Narendra Modi, who is now a leading candidate to be India's next prime minister.

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Party Like It's 1799: Traditional Cider Makes A Comeback

Friday, November 29, 2013

Cider is still a small part of the overall alcohol market, but it's growing faster than any other category — and not just the hot mulled stuff that steams up your kitchen. This cider is more like sparkling wine. Some of it is made with the same apple varieties, and in the same style, as the cider bottled by Thomas Jefferson.

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On The Media

The Journalist Behind Jackie Robinson

Friday, November 29, 2013

Throughout the more than six-decade celebration of Jackie Robinson's desegregation of baseball, the journalist who brought Robinson's story to the world has remained unknown. In an interview that originally aired in May, Brooke talks to Los Angeles Times sports writer Bill Plashcke, who recently penned a portrait of writer Wendell Smith, who helped secure Robinson's place in American history. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

"The Armory Show at 100"

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Curator Marilyn Kushner and exhibition historian and catalog editor/contributor Casey Blake, talk about “The Armory Show at 100: Modern Art and Revolution,” on view at the New-York Historical Society through February 23, 2014. The exhibition celebrates the centennial year of the legendary 1913 Armory Show, one of the most important art events and a turning point in American art, and brings together 100 masterworks from the show, including iconic pieces by Marcel Duchamp, Henri Matisse, Francis Picabia, Constantin Brancusi, Pablo Picasso and John Marin, and others.

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Squash Your Thanksgiving With Tips From The Test Kitchen

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Tired of the same old pumpkin pie or squash side dish? Morning Edition challenged Chris Kimball of America's Test Kitchen to shake up Thanksgiving with recipes that put a new spin on the humble gourd. His chosen recipes include barley risotto with butternut squash and maple-pumpkin stack cake.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

American Treasures from the New Zealand Film Archive

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Professor Scott Simmon talks about the National Film Preservation Foundation’s DVD set, Lost and Found: American Treasures from the New Zealand Film Archive. The collection includes “Upstream” (1927), a charming backstage comedy feature directed by John Ford; “Won in the Cupboard” (1914), the first surviving film directed by and starring Mabel Normand; and “The White Shadow” (1924), the first surviving feature on which Alfred Hitchcock has a credited role, and other treats.

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The Takeaway

Archaeologists Uncover Buddha's Birthplace

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

For a few years, archaeologists have been excavating a site in Nepal that is said to be Buddha's birthplace. And they now say that they've found evidence of a Buddhist shrine there that dates back to sixth century B.C. Robin Coningham has published his research and findings in the journal Antiquity. Coningham is a professor of archaeology at Durham University in England and joins The Takeaway to explain this revelation.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Rebuilding the White House

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Robert Klara talks about the Truman administration’s controversial rebuilding of the White House, which was in danger of collapsing when President Harry Truman and his family moved in when he took office. The Hidden White House: Harry Truman and the Reconstruction of America’s Most Famous Residence shows how Truman’s rebuilding of the White House is a snapshot of postwar America and its first Cold War leader, undertaking a job that changed the centerpiece of the country’s national heritage.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Lincoln in the World

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Kevin Peraino explains how Abraham Lincoln evolved into one of our seminal foreign-policy presidents and helped point the way to America’s rise to world power. Lincoln had never traveled overseas and spoke no foreign languages, yet, during the Civil War, Lincoln and his team skillfully managed to avoid European intervention on the side of the Confederacy. In Lincoln in the World, Kevin Peraino reveals Lincoln to be an indispensable diplomat.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Police and Domestic Violence; Rebuilding the White House; Gore Vidal's Private Life; Lincoln in the World

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Frontline correspondent Walt Bogdanich on what happens when police officers are involved domestic violence cases. Find out how the Truman Administration literally rebuilt the White House after they discovered that the building was on the brink of collapse. Tim Teeman reveals the complicated private life of Gore Vidal. And we’ll look at Abraham Lincoln’s foreign policy and how the 16th president managed to convince European powers not to intervene in the Civil War on behalf of the Confederacy.

Radiolab

Otzi Confirms: Tattoos Have Always Been Cool

Monday, November 25, 2013

Producer Andy Mills takes a close look at Ötzi's ink -- the roughly 5,300-year-old Iceman has more than 50 tattoos etched into his skin. (PS: If you haven't listened yet, check out our latest short, all about Ötzi, An Ice-Cold Case).

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A History Of Indentured Labor Gives 'Coolie' Its Sting

Monday, November 25, 2013

Although the slur today is used mostly in the context of the Caribbean, in the past it was often applied to low-wage, immigrant laborers in the United States.

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At Auction, Maltese Falcon Goes For $4 Million, Dreams Included

Monday, November 25, 2013

Sam Spade would say the falcon is much more than a bird: It's the "stuff that dreams are made of." One of the two statues used in the 1941 movie was sold at an auction in New York Monday.

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The Takeaway

'One Red Rose' Sets JFK's Assassination to Music

Monday, November 25, 2013

Composer Steven Mackey was only 7-years-old when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas on November 22, 1963. But he still has vivid memories from the tragedy, and he wrote the musical piece "One Red Rose" in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the assassination. "One Red Rose" was commissioned by Carnegie Hall, Yellow Barn, and the Nasher Center. It premiered at Carnegie Hall in February 2013 and is being performed in Dallas this weekend by The Brentano string quartet.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Egyptomania

Monday, November 25, 2013

Bob Brier, one of the world's foremost Egyptologists, discusses our 3,000-year-old fixation with recovering Egyptian culture and its meaning. His book Egyptomania draws on his personal collection and is an inventive and mesmerizing tour of how an ancient civilization endures in ours today.

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Rev. T.J. Jemison Remembered As Civil Rights Movement Pioneer

Friday, November 22, 2013

Louisiana is paying tribute Friday to the Rev. T.J. Jemison, a strong and steady voice against unequal treatment for blacks in the Jim Crow South. Jemison helped organize a bus boycott in Baton Rouge in 1953 and later advised Martin Luther King Jr. and others on how to orchestrate the Montgomery boycott.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Where Were You When You Heard JFK Was Shot?

Friday, November 22, 2013

Where were you fifty years ago today? How did you change after the assassination of John F. Kennedy? How did you see our country change?

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