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History

The Leonard Lopate Show

Bloomberg and Climate Change; the Chelsea Hotel; Winter Solstice Celebration; Oliver Wendell Holmes and Free Speech

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

On todays show, we’ll look into Mayor Bloomberg’s legacy of climate change legislation. We’ll take you inside a legendary place where many artists have lived, loved (and even died), the Chelsea Hotel. Grammy-winning saxophonist, composer, and bandleader Paul Winter gives us a preview of his upcoming Winter Solstice Celebration. And Thomas Healy explains how Supreme Court justice Oliver Wendell Holmes changed changed the history of free speech in America. 

Zoinks! Tracing The History Of 'Zombie' From Haiti To The CDC

Sunday, December 15, 2013

Zombies populate our books, graphic novels, movies and video games with race and slavery playing an unexpected role. Our national obsession with zombies dates back centuries and can be traced to Haiti. Code Switch examines how the word "zombie" was born and how it has taken a life of its own.

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In The Background: Art You May Never Notice

Saturday, December 14, 2013

Why that unassuming museum art — which you'll find behind taxidermic bison and birds — deserves a closer look.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Invention of the American Meal

Friday, December 13, 2013

Why did Americans abandoned a rustic, single mid-day meal for complex roasts, sides, desserts, and—increasingly—processed foods?

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TED Radio Hour

Does Language Bring Us Together Or Pull Us Apart?

Friday, December 13, 2013

Mark Pagel says early humans developed language as a tool to cooperate. But with thousands of different languages, Pagel says language also exists to prevent us from communicating outside our tribal groups.

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TED Radio Hour

How Does History Change The Meaning Of Words?

Friday, December 13, 2013

Etymologist Mark Forsyth shares the surprising back story on the term "president."

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The Takeaway

The Myth of Race & Its Historical Consequences

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Race is embedded the fabric of American culture, and racial categories and their implications persist today. In "A Dreadful Deceit: The Myth of Race from the Colonial Era to Obama's America," Jacqueline Jones, professor of history at the University of Texas, Austin, argues against our continued use of racial categories—at least in the ways Americans have used these categories since the country's founding. 

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The Takeaway

Retro Report: The Exxon Valdez Disaster

Monday, December 09, 2013

This week our friends at Retro Report look back at a cold March night in 1989 when the tanker Exxon Valdez ran aground off the coast of Southern Alaska, spilling 11 million gallons of crude oil into the waters of Prince William Sound and creating one of the worst oil spills in American history. Scott Michels, reporter for Retro Report, joins The Takeaway to examine how the spill happened and what we did and didn't learn from the disaster.

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The Takeaway

Vast Number of Silent Films Lost to History

Monday, December 09, 2013

Silent movies are still the earliest cinematic record of our time—even if they have long been surpassed by more exciting forms of theater. Unfortunately, the Library of Congress has reported that much of that record has been lost to history. Dan Streible, a professor of cinema studies at New York University and founder of The Orphan Film Symposium, joins The Takeaway to discuss the significance of this lost record of silent cinema, and whether the U.S. can recover these pieces of missing history.

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Don't You Dare Call Me A Hipster! I, Sir, Am A 'Hep Cat'

Sunday, December 08, 2013

Jive-talking, jazz-loving "hep cats" from the 1930s and 1940s are the great-grandparents of today's hipsters. The interest of white fans in black music helped fill Harlem's nightclubs and prompted derision. Hipsters were criticized for being the equivalent of a "pretentious poet laureate."

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In Kiev, Protesters Topple Statue Of Vladimir Lenin

Sunday, December 08, 2013

Thousands of protesters are calling for the ouster of their president, who wants closer ties with Russia. Ukraine has seen daily protests for more than two weeks now.

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Music And Mandela: Vusi Mahlasela Remembers

Friday, December 06, 2013

South African musician Vusi Mahlasela's work was born out of the struggle against apartheid. His song "When You Come Back" was performed at Mandela's 1994 inauguration and was written to the political exiles who escaped South Africa. Mahlasela shares his memories with host Michel Martin.

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South Africans Mourn Loss Of 'Father' Nelson Mandela

Friday, December 06, 2013

Nelson Mandela was an inspirational figure around the world for decades. Host Michel Martin talks with Ferial Haffajee, editor at City Press in Johannesburg, about the immediate reactions from South Africans to Mandela's passing.

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Ghana's President: Mandela's Long Walk Became Africa's Journey

Friday, December 06, 2013

As the world pays tribute to Nelson Mandela, Ghana's president, John Dramani Mahama, remembers the effect the elder statesman had on his own political career. Mahama shares his memories with host Michel Martin.

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Mandela Suffered The Most So He Could Ask The Most, Says Ambassador

Friday, December 06, 2013

The world is reacting to news that Nelson Mandela has passed away. Ebrahim Rasool, South Africa's Ambassador to the United States, met Mandela in prison and he's been inspired by him ever since. Rasool speaks to host Michel Martin about Nelson Mandela's life and legacy.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

M.F.K. Fisher, Julia Child, James Beard, and the Reinvention of American Taste

Friday, December 06, 2013

Luke Barr talks about a culinary gathering in the winter of 1970, which bright together James Beard, M.F.K. Fisher, Julia Child, Richard Olney, Simone Beck, and Judith Jones in the South of France. They cooked and ate, talked and argued, and their conversations were chronicled by M.F.K. Fisher in journals and letters—some of which were later discovered by Luke Barr, her great-nephew. He writes about it in Provence, 1970: M.F.K. Fisher, Julia Child, James Beard, and the Reinvention of American Taste.

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Nelson Mandela: An Audio History

Thursday, December 05, 2013

A Radio Diaries documentary offers a window into South Africa's half-century-long struggle for democracy through rare sound recordings of freedom fighter Nelson Mandela — and those who fought with and against him.

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The First Time I Heard The Name 'Mandela'

Thursday, December 05, 2013

The South African leader's life held special power for black Americans, who lost many iconic civil rights leaders tragically early. Karen Grigsby Bates reflects on Mandela's legacy.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Japan 1941

Wednesday, December 04, 2013

Eri Hotta considers the attack on Pearl Harbor from the Japanese perspective and argues that when Japan launched hostilities against the United States in 1941, its leaders largely understood they were entering a war they were almost certain to lose. Her book Japan 1941: Countdown to Infamy poses an essential question: Why did these men—military men, civilian politicians, diplomats, the emperor—put their country and its citizens so unnecessarily in harm’s way? She draws on material little known to Western readers to find an answer.

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Underground Cities And 'Ghost' Miners: What Some People Do For Gold

Tuesday, December 03, 2013

South Africa's Mponeng gold mine is a 2.5-mile-deep network of chutes and tunnels that employs about 4,000 miners. Of course, that number doesn't include the miners who wander its tunnels clandestinely, stealing and refining ore. In a new book, journalist Matthew Hart investigates why gold and crime sometimes go hand in hand.

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