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History

Collecting The Letters Of Wartime

Sunday, February 09, 2014

Letters written in a time of war reflect almost universal longing and loss, no matter the century or the enemy. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Andrew Carroll, the director of the Center for American War Letters, about his personal collection of wartime correspondence from every American conflict, going back to 1776.

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Wacky Moments In Winter Olympic History

Saturday, February 08, 2014

The problems with decrepit hotel rooms and stray dogs in Sochi, Russia, are stealing the headlines, but they are hardly the first Olympics to stumble. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Esquire Magazine's AJ Jacobs about some of the more inglorious moments in Winter Olympics history.

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Memento Of A Lost Childhood: Anne Frank's Marbles

Saturday, February 08, 2014

Before her family went into hiding, Anne Frank gave away some of her toys to her neighbor, Toosje Kupers. The gift included a set of marbles, now on display at at an art gallery in Rotterdam. NPR's Scott Simon takes a moment to note the childhood gift.

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Russia Hopes Sochi Ceremonies Stop 'Toilet Tweeting'

Friday, February 07, 2014

As the Winter Olympic Games get underway in Sochi, host Michel Martin speaks with Russian culture expert Jennifer Eremeeva about what the opening ceremonies can teach us about Russia and its people.

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The Takeaway

Inside the Birth of Beatlemania

Friday, February 07, 2014

On February 9, 1964, tuning up to the sound of screaming girls, The Beatles's first notes blasted across the airwaves in the US. 73 million Americans tuned in to see the Fab Four on The Ed Sullivan Show for the first time. Vince Calandra was the program coordinator for The Ed Sullivan Show at the time. He reflects on the beginning of Beatlemania in the United States, and that historic night. 

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In Sochi, An Olympic Artist Sees The 'Possible'

Thursday, February 06, 2014

Artist Marc Ahr has been drawing the Olympics for 22 years. For him, it doesn't matter what the press narrative is, how the countries are preparing, or even who wins or loses. Asked about negative news surrounding Sochi, he says that here, "everything is impossible, but everything is possible."

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The Takeaway

An Inside Look at the History of Sochi

Thursday, February 06, 2014

On the eve of the Opening Ceremony, so much attention of the attention on the Winter Olympics has focused on security and internal domestic policies in Russia. Putting all that aside, what does the global community really know about Sochi, the city that we’ll all be watching for the next two weeks? Charles King, Professor of International Affairs and Government at Georgetown University and author of the book, "The Ghost of Freedom: A History of the Caucuses" explains why this region and its proximity to the Black Sea has been so important for Russia.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Civil Rights and the March Against Fear

Thursday, February 06, 2014

Aram Goudsouzian tells the story of one of the central dramas of the civil rights era—the “March Against Fear” in Mississippi and the shooting of the leader of the march, James Meredith. Goudsouzian's book Down to the Crossroads: Civil Rights, Black Power, and the Meredith March Against Fear reveals the legacy of an event that would both integrate African Americans into the political system and inspire bolder protests against them. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

McCarthyism and Activism in Cold War New York

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Phillip Deery looks back at how McCarthyism shook up the lives of six political activists with ties to New York City by undermining civil liberties, curtailing equality before the law, and tarnishing the ideals of American democracy. In The Red Apple: Communism and McCarthy in Cold War New York Deery explores the human consequences of the widespread paranoia that gripped a nation.

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'Tiger Mother' Author Spells Out 3 Traits That Drive Success In The U.S.

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Yale law professor Amy Chua sparked controversy with her first book, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, where she touted her strict style of parenting. Now she and her husband, Jed Rubenfeld, are out with a new book, The Triple Package. The couple talk about why they believe some cultural groups are better poised for success.

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Alarm As Haitians Flee Country

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Natural disasters, unemployment and poverty in Haiti have prompted many people to risk their lives to flee the country. Host Michel Martin speaks with Miami Herald reporter Jacqueline Charles about the struggles Haitians face and what's being done to fix the problem.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How Brothers John Foster Dulles and Allen Dulles Shaped the World

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

At the peak of the Cold War in the 1950s, two powerful brothers—Secretary of State John Foster Dulles and CIA director Allen Dulles —led the United States into a series of foreign conflicts whose effects are still felt around the world today. Historian Stephen Kinzer explains how they were both propelled by what he calls a quintessentially American set of fears and delusions. In  The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War, Kinzer, looks at their campaigns that pushed countries from Guatemala to the Congo into long spirals of violence, led the United States into the Vietnam War, and laid the foundation for decades of hostility between the United States and other countries.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Family Meeting: Our Noisy Lives

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

The Brian Lehrer Show hosts a two-hour special on NOISE -- from annoying noises, NYC's ever-changing soundscape, and the hidden social history of noise. From 10am to noon, live on WNYC.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Noise and Creativity Throughout History

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

David Hendy, media historian at the University of Sussex, host of the thirty-part BBC Radio series, Noise: A Human History, and the author of Noise: A Human History of Sound and Listening, talks about the social history of noise and kicks off the call-in on the question of sound and creativity.  What sounds sparks your creativity or do you need absolute quiet?

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Good and Evil; the Story of Dancer Tanaquil le Clercq; Roddy Doyle's Novel, The Guts; Brothers Who Shaped History

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

On today’s show: Cognitive scientist Paul Bloom explains why he thinks that a moral sense of good and evil is hardwired into our brains from birth. Director Nancy Biurski talks about her documentary about Tanaquil le Clercq, the ballet star who was a muse to George Balanchine and Jerome Robbins before she was paralyzed by polio at the age of 27. Roddy Doyle discusses his new novel The Guts, which picks up the story of his bestseller, The Commitments, almost 30 years later. And we’ll look at how John Foster Dulles and his brother Allen Dulles led the United States into foreign conflicts in the 1950s and how we’re still feeling the aftereffects today.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Black Barbershops and the Civil Rights Movement

Friday, January 31, 2014

Historian Quincy T. Mills chronicles the cultural history of black barbershops as businesses and civic institutions. He talks about how barbers played a significant though complicated role in 20th-century racial politics. His book Cutting Along the Color Line: Barbershops is a sweeping history of an iconic cultural establishment that shows how black entrepreneurship was linked to the struggle for equality.

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Indian Country Sets Priorities With State Of Nations Address

Friday, January 31, 2014

Just days after President Obama delivered his State of the Union, National Congress of American Indians President Brian Cladoosby gave the annual State of Indian Nations address. Host Michel Martin speaks to Cladoosby about the issues facing Indian country this year.

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The Takeaway

Russian Weapons Removal & The Cold War Backpack Bomb

Friday, January 31, 2014

After the Cold War, MIT Physicist Thomas Neff developed a program to allow Moscow to sell the uranium from its retired weapons and dilute it into fuel for electric utilities in the U.S. He explains the program today. New details about portable nuclear weapons designed by the U.S. military during the Cold War describe a weapon small enough to be strapped on a backpack, but still powerful enough to potentially cause devastating damage. Adam Rawnsley of Foreign Policy magazine has the details.

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Egypt: 'A Very Divided Nation Right Now'

Thursday, January 30, 2014

The third anniversary of the Egyptian uprising finds its democratically elected president on trial. So where does that leave the rest of the country? Host Michel Martin speaks with NPR's Cairo Bureau Chief Leila Fadel about the latest in Egypt.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Greg Grandin on The Empire of Necessity

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Greg Grandin tells the story of a remarkable slave rebellion that occurred in 1805. Off a remote island in the South Pacific, Captain Amasa Delano, a New England seal hunter, climbed aboard a distressed Spanish ship carrying scores of West Africans he thought were slaves. They weren’t. Having earlier seized control of the vessel and slaughtered most of the crew, they were staging an elaborate ruse, acting as if they were humble servants. The Empire of Necessity: Slavery, Freedom, and Deception in the New World explores this extraordinary event, which inspired Herman Melville’s masterpiece Benito Cereno.


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