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History

Ecological Stories Uncovered With Whale Bones In Chile

Sunday, March 02, 2014

Several years ago, construction workers in Chile found whale fossils from 6 to 9 million years ago. NPR's Jacki Lyden speaks with Nick Pyenson, a paleontologist with the Smithsonian, who helped remove the fossils.

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All Things Considered

'Invisible' Same-Sex Couples Push For Civil Unions In Greece

Friday, February 28, 2014

The LGBT community says Greece is a macho country where being gay means being anti-Greek. Greece currently holds the EU presidency, and activists are using that to spotlight their struggle.

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Will President's Initiative Be A 'Game-Changer' For Young Men Of Color?

Friday, February 28, 2014

"My Brother's Keeper" is a new White House initiative designed to help young men of color succeed. Law professor Paul Butler and youth advocate Malik Washington discuss the president's new plan.

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New Tech City

The Man Who Tried to Eliminate All Words, But Never Met a Smartphone

Friday, February 28, 2014

This is a story of heroic effort, decades of toil and a man obsessed with a utopian dream: to replace the written word with symbols. And how today's text message tools could have helped. 

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Enjoy WNYC's Tube Noise-Free Sound? You're Not Alone

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Thomas Edison's 'right hand man' praises WNYC's static-free sound in this 1936 missive.

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Chokwe Lumumba: From 'Radical' To 'Revolutionary'

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Jackson Mississippi Mayor Chokwe Lumumba passed away this week. Host Michel Martin learns more about the civil rights attorney and the activists he mentored.

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In Parts Of Vermont, Heroin Is 'The Easiest Drug To Get'

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Vermont might be known as an idyll of small towns and maple syrup, but it's also dealing with a major heroin crisis. Journalist Gina Tron, who grew up there, says it doesn't surprise her.

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Morning Edition

From Aztecs To Oscars: Popcorn's Beautiful, Explosive Journey

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Long before it fueled moviegoers, popcorn helped lay the foundation for the Aztec empire. In our video, we look at popcorn under a microscope, where the rock-hard kernel's fluffy secret is revealed.

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Morning Edition

FBI's Abscam Videos Are As Unbelievable As 'American Hustle'

Thursday, February 27, 2014

The Oscar contender is loosely based on the Abscam sting, which nailed a senator and six House members on corruption charges. The FBI videotaped some Hollywood-worthy scenes.

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The Takeaway

Meet the Real People Behind the Best Pictures: '12 Years a Slave'

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

All this week on our "Real People / Best Pictures" series, we're looking at some of the films that are nominated for Best Picture, and exploring the stories with people who are intimately connected with the films. "12 Years A Slave" tells the story of Solomon Northup, who was enslaved until he was eventually able to regain his freedom 12 years later. The film is based on Northup’s memoir, which was a bestseller during his time. Today we talk to Clayton Adams, the great-great-great-grandson of Solomon Northup. 

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Fresh Air

During World War I, Germany Unleashed 'Terrorist Cell In America'

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

In Dark Invasion, Howard Blum explores the campaign of sabotage that Germany inflicted on an unsuspecting U.S. As ships and factories blew up, "no one really suspected a spy network," he says.

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Life of the Law

Bad Constitution

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

With more than 300,000 words and over 800 amendments, Alabama’s Constitution is 40 times longer than the US Constitution, and holds the record for being the longest active constitution in the world. Originally written in 1901 by men seeking to establis...

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Gifts of Atheism

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

In his new book, Imagine There's No Heaven: How Atheism Helped Create the Modern WorldMitchell Stephens, historian, journalist and professor of Media Studies at New York University, argues that most advancements in human thought were made by non-believers.

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All Things Considered

Alice Herz-Sommer, Pianist And Holocaust Survivor, Dies At 110

Monday, February 24, 2014

Renowned concert pianist Alice Herz-Sommer, once thought to be the oldest living Holocaust survivor, has died at age 110. Her story is told in the Oscar-nominated film, The Lady in Number 6.

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Oldest-Known Holocaust Survivor Dies; Pianist Was 110

Monday, February 24, 2014

Alice Herz-Sommer survived two years in a Nazi camp. She performed for prisoners and said music saved her life. Her longevity, Herz-Sommer said, was due to an amazingly positive view of the world.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Studying Abroad, Bosnia, Obesity and Age, Affordable Housing

Monday, February 24, 2014

On today's show: Time magazine writer Amanda Ripley talks about following three American high school students as they studied abroad for a year in countries with higher standards, better teaching, and more motivated students. Then, Kenan Trebincevic discusses his memoir, The Bosnia List, about returning to Bosnia 20 years after he and his family fled the war there. Time magazine reporter Alice Park on the problems of obesity in children. Plus, New York Observer reporter Chris Pomorski looks at why efforts to incorporate affordable housing into real estate development plans like Hudson Yards have had mixed results, and what changes the de Blasio administration plans to make.

Cholent: The Original Slow-Cooked Dish

Saturday, February 22, 2014

A stewed dish cooked very low and slow, cholent has roots in the Jewish Sabbath. This ancient stew directly inspired the Crock-Pot – and maybe the French cassoulet and Boston baked beans as well.

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Remembering Buddy Esquire, The King Of Hip-Hop Flyers

Saturday, February 22, 2014

Buddy Esquire, who died last month, produced hundreds of flyers for parties back in hip-hop's primordial days — flyers that are some of the only surviving documents of that early scene.

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Iconoclastic Musician Takes Measure Of His Life: 'I Became A Fighter'

Saturday, February 22, 2014

Fred Ho has combined improvisation with Asian themes to create his own form of political activism. Now, at age 56, Ho is dying of cancer.

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Voting Rights: Time To Think Differently For Those Who've Done Time?

Friday, February 21, 2014

Attorney General Eric Holder wants states to restore voting rights to felons after they complete their sentences. Legal analysts Spencer Overton and Hans von Spakovsky look at the debate.

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