Streams

 

History

What Are The Rules For Changing A Country's Borders?

Saturday, March 15, 2014

Drawing borders feels like an anachronism that was the domain of 19th-century diplomats, but Crimea shows that national boundaries still aren't considered fixed in many parts of the world.

Comment

Like So Many Others, Leaving Ireland For A Better Life

Saturday, March 15, 2014

On St. Patrick's Day weekend, NPR's Jacki Lyden reflects on her own family's journey from Ireland to America, and back again.

Comment

All Things Considered

A Farewell To Carrot Cake (And Other Things Lost Without World War I)

Thursday, March 13, 2014

All Things Considered asked listeners to imagine how one aspect of the past 100 years would be different if the Great War had never happened. We received more than 1,500 fascinating stories.

Comment

The Takeaway

Teenage: Inside The Invention Adolescence

Thursday, March 13, 2014

Where did teenagers come from? During the end of the 19th century and into the first half of the 20th, a population that once went straight from childhood to adulthood now had another stage entirely.

Comments [1]

All Things Considered

Without World War I, A Slower U.S. Rise, No 'God Bless America'

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

If the Great War had never happened, America might look vastly different. Among other things, woman's suffrage and the civil rights movement might have suffered.

Comment

All Things Considered

A World Without World War I, Featuring Health-Nut Hitler

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

One hundred years after the Great War, we're looking back at the history that wasn't. If Archduke Franz Ferdinand hadn't been killed in 1914, how would the world be different?

Comment

Soundcheck

Ralph Ellison: Learning About A Man From His Records

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Loren Schoenberg, artistic director of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem, talks about their new exhibit on writer Ralph Ellison's record collection.

Comment

All Things Considered

Move To Honor Prohibition-Era 'Untouchable' Hits A Snag

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Several U.S. senators want to name the ATF's Washington headquarters after Eliot Ness, credited with bringing down mobster Al Capone. But some Chicago officials say Ness doesn't deserve the glory.

Comment

The Takeaway

Another Cold War? Russia Can't Afford It

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

The economic climate of today's Russia is nothing like the Soviet Union's was two decades ago — and that could be the crucial factor that prevents the current conflict over Crimea from escalating.

Comments [2]

Radiolab

Super Cool

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

What do frozen horses and a scorching universe have in common? That's what we wanted to know.

Read More

Comments [80]

All Things Considered

What Pepsi Can Teach Us About Soft (Drink) Power In Russia

Monday, March 10, 2014

The soft drink giant is one of the few big U.S. firms with major investments in Russia. And the reasons why say a lot about why the U.S. has less leverage in Russia than it might like.

Comment

QUIZ: What Came Out Of World War I?

Monday, March 10, 2014

World War I shook up the world in a dramatic way — and from that chaos emerged inventions, words and other things we still use today. Can you identify them all?

Comment

Morning Edition

Stokely Carmichael, A Philosopher Behind The Black Power Movement

Monday, March 10, 2014

A new biography traces Carmichael's evolution from civil rights activist to an early proponent of the black power movement and international human rights advocate.

Comment

Destroyed By Rockefellers, Mural Trespassed On Political Vision

Sunday, March 09, 2014

When Mexican artist Diego Rivera was commissioned to do a mural for Rockefeller Center, some may have wondered whether industrialist tycoon John D. Rockefeller Jr. knew what he was getting into.

Comment

New Look At The Man Behind Black Power

Friday, March 07, 2014

Stokely Carmichel popularized one of the best known and most polarizing phrases of the civil rights era: "black power." Historian Peniel Joseph shares his new book Stokely: A Life.

Comment

How Bad Directions (And A Sandwich) Started World War I

Thursday, March 06, 2014

World War I began 100 years ago this summer. The spark — Archduke Ferdinand's assassination — was dramatic, tragic and, in some ways, almost comic.

Comment

All Things Considered

A Lifelong Radio Man Wins New Fans With 'Big Broadcast'

Thursday, March 06, 2014

Ed Walker fell in love with radio as a kid in the 1930s. Today, as the host of WAMU 88.5's beloved Sunday night show, he introduces a new generation to classic programs from the golden age of radio.

Comment

Morning Edition

Re-Released Recordings Reveal Literary Titans In Their Youth

Thursday, March 06, 2014

In the early 1960s, a young couple in Boston set out to make audio recordings of relatively young, up-and-coming writers — like James Baldwin, Philip Roth and John Updike — reading their own works.

Comment

Fresh Air

The Case For Tammany Hall Being On The Right Side Of History

Wednesday, March 05, 2014

In a new book, Terry Golway takes a sympathetic view of Manhattan's infamous political machine. He says, "Tammany Hall was there for the poor immigrant who was otherwise friendless in New York."

Comment

All Things Considered

What Really Happened The Night Kitty Genovese Was Murdered?

Monday, March 03, 2014

Thirty-eight people witnessed Genovese's murder in Queens, N.Y., and didn't do a thing about it, according to news reports from 1964. Fifty years later, a new book tells a different story.

Comment