Streams

 

 

History

Despite Financial Challenges, HBCUs Fight To Remain A Bargain

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Historically black colleges and universities remain a gateway to higher education for millions of students. But how are the institutions and their students weathering difficult financial challenges?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Invention of the News

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Long before the invention of printing, people wanted information. Andrew Pettegree tracks the history of news in ten countries over the course of four centuries—from gossip, civic ceremony, sermons, and proclamations to printed pamphlets, edicts, journals to the local and worldwide news as we know it today. In The Invention of the News: How the World Came to Know About Itself, Pettegree investigates who controlled the news and who reported it, news as a tool of political protest and religious reform, issues of privacy and titillation, reliability and trust.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Making of a Khmer Rouge Torturer

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

On April 17, 1975, the communist Khmer Rouge, led by its secretive prime minister Pol Pot, took over Cambodia. They cut the nation off from the world and began systematically killing and starving two million of their people. Thirty years after their fall, a man named Duch, who had served as Chief Prison officer at the regime's central prison complex, stood trial for war crimes and crimes against humanity. Journalist Thierry Cruvellier takes us into the dark heart of Cambodia's Khmer Rouge, using the trial to tell the horrifying story of this terrible chapter in history. The Master of Confessions: The Making of a Khmer Rouge Torturer is an account of a Chief Interrogator's trial for war crimes.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Getting into College; Guastavino Architectural Work; Inventing the News; Justice for a Khmer Rouge Torturer

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

On today’s show: Brooklyn high school guidance counselor Joshua Steckel talks about what happened to some of his students once they achieved their dream of going to college. Then, we’ll find out about the remarkable architectural work by Rafael Guastavino and his son, and where to find it around New York. Andrew Pettegree talks about the invention of the news—from before the printing press was invented to the Internet Age. Journalist Thierry Cruvellier on the 2005 trial of the Khmer Rouge’s chief prison official.

Life of the Law

Trouble with Profiling

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Is ‘looking Mexican’ a legal reason for the Border Patrol to stop a car? Federal law says agents have to have ‘reasonable suspicion’ that something illegal is happening. But what that means depends where you are, and whom you ask.

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The Takeaway

Never-Published Tennessee Williams Story Surfaces

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Drunken antics and foiled romance mark Williams’ campus story that sat on a shelf for years. But its new publisher says it showed signs of the genius to come.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Tale of Murder, Madness, Tyranny, and Perversion in Ancient Rome

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Classical historian James Romm tells the juicy story of of murder, madness, tyranny, and perversion, set in ancient Rome. Seneca, then Rome’s preeminent writer and philosopher, was appointed as tutor to 12-year-old Nero, the future emperor of Rome. Controlling them both was Nero’s mother, Julia Agrippina the Younger, great-granddaughter of the Emperor Augustus, sister of the Emperor Caligula, niece and fourth wife of Emperor Claudius. Dying Every Day: Seneca at the Court of Nero is about the moral struggles, political intrigue, and bloody vengeance that surrounded Seneca in the twisted imperial family and the perverse, paranoid regime of Emperor Nero, who was a despot and a madman.

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Story of the Jews

Monday, March 24, 2014

Simon Schama details the story of the Jewish experience, tracing it across three millennia, from their beginnings as an ancient tribal people to the opening of the New World in 1492. His book The Story of the Jews: Finding the Words 1000 BC–1492 AD spans the millennia and the continents—from India to Andalusia and from the bazaars of Cairo to the streets of Oxford. It’s a story of a Jewish world immersed in and imprinted by the peoples among whom they have dwelled, from the Egyptians to the Greeks, from the Arabs to the Christians.

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When Vanilla Was Brown And How We Came To See It As White

Sunday, March 23, 2014

Vanilla has become a cultural metaphor for blandness and whiteness. But the flavor's history is rife with conquest and slavery and theft.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

"From Both Sides of the Aegean"

Friday, March 21, 2014

Maria Iliou, who wrote and directed the documentary “From Both Sides of the Aegean: Expulsion and Exchange of Populations, Turkey-Greece: 1922-1924,” and historical consultant Alexander Kitroeff, discuss documenting the ethnic cleansing and violent expulsion of Greeks from the Ottoman Empire. In the first compulsory “exchange of populations” in the modern world, 1.2 million Greek Orthodox and 400,000 Muslims were forcibly relocated from Turkey to Greece and Greece to Turkey respectively. “From Both Sides of the Aegean” opens March 21 at the Quad Cinema.

Comments [6]

Westboro Baptist's Fred Phelps: More Than A Hater?

Friday, March 21, 2014

Westboro Baptist Church founder Fred Phelps died on Wednesday. He's best remembered for his anti-gay views, and for leading protests at funerals. But he once was viewed as a fighter for civil rights.

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Egyptian Women Want To Be Recognized In Revolution

Friday, March 21, 2014

Egyptians are still fighting to shape their country's future. Activist Maissan Hassan talks about trying to secure the place of Egyptian women in the history of the Arab Spring.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Caffeine; "Nymphomaniac"; Ethnic Cleansing in Greece and Turkey; Please Explain

Friday, March 21, 2014

On today’s show, we’ll find out about America’s favorite addictive drug, caffeine. Charlotte Gainsbourg and Stellan Skarsgård talk about starring in Lars von Trier’s controversial new film, “Nymphomaniac.” We’ll also take a look at why, in the early 1920s, 1.2 million Greek Orthodox people were expelled from Turkey and 400,000 Muslims were expelled from Greece. Plus, this week’s Please Explain is all about medical marijuana.

Radio Diaries

#12: Frankie’s Teenage Diary, Revisited

Thursday, March 20, 2014

"I went from being on the front page for football, representing my itty-bitty school, to being on the front page as a thief and a meth head." - Frankie Lewchuck

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Persian New Year's Table Celebrates Nature's Rebirth Deliciously

Thursday, March 20, 2014

Around the world, millions of families of Iranian descent will gather around a ceremonial table to mark the start of spring. This ancient Persian festival has a lot to do with fresh, green foods.

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Plan Bossy Instead Of Ban Bossy?

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

The "ban bossy" campaign has support of women CEOs and even Beyonce. But critics say it misses the mark. The beauty shop ladies weigh in: Connie Schultz, Keli Goff, Bridget Johnson and Michele Norris.

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The Takeaway

A Fight for the Skies During the Heyday of Hijacking

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

From 1961 to 1972, more than 150 commercial flights were hijacked in the U.S. As the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 continues, the search for answers moves to the motives of hijackers in the past.

Comments [4]

Remembering The Late Politician Reubin Askew

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

The Florida Governor pushed for racial equality in the 1970s, when it was not popular to do so. Ken Rudin, political analyst and host of his own podcast, Ken Rudin's Political Junkie, remembers Askew.

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Fresh Air

Cannibals And Colonialism: Solving The Mystery Of Michael Rockefeller

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

The son of one of America's wealthiest families disappeared off the island of New Guinea in 1961. Writer Carl Hoffman explains how he thinks Rockefeller died and why the truth was kept hidden.

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Fresh Air

What U.S. Learned From 'Heathen School' Wasn't Part Of The Lesson Plan

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

The 19th century Connecticut school sought to convert young men from Hawaii, China, India and the Native American nations and then send them home as Christian missionaries. It did not go as planned.

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