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History

Born A Slave, Street Performer Was First Black Recording Artist

Sunday, April 06, 2014

In 1890, George Washington Johnson became the first African-American to make commercial records. The Library of Congress is now adding Johnson's "The Laughing Song" to the National Recording Registry.

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Family Musical Legacy Is No Burden For 'Carter Girl'

Sunday, April 06, 2014

"You have to carry on the legacy of Carter Family music," Carlene Carter's mother told her. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with country singer Carlene Carter about that and her new album, Carter Girl.

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Stereotypes Of Appalachia Obscure A Diverse Picture

Sunday, April 06, 2014

Appalachia has become a familiar shorthand for rural, white Americans, typically in poverty. But in reality, the region has a rich ethnic history and a rapidly diversifying future.

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'Hotel Rwanda' Manager: We've Failed To Learn From History

Saturday, April 05, 2014

As a hotel manager in Rwanda, Paul Rusesabagina sheltered more than a thousand people, saving their lives during the 1994 genocide. Now, 20 years on, he says history is repeating itself.

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The Takeaway

View from the Eastern Bloc: Poland

Friday, April 04, 2014

All this week, The Takeaway is speaking with people who grew up in the Eastern Bloc and asking them to reflect on the crisis today in Ukraine. Today, the voice of someone who grew up under communism in Poland.

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Who's Boosting Box Office Numbers? Report Says Latinos

Friday, April 04, 2014

Although Latinos are 17 percent of the population, they represent almost a third of frequent moviegoers. People of color overall attend movies at rates higher than their percentage of the population.

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Morning Edition

Chicago Celebrates A Century Of Baseball At Wrigley Field

Friday, April 04, 2014

It's been the home of the Cubs since 1916, and in all that time, the team has never won a World Series. So why do fans keep showing up? Locals say Wrigley's hallowed status isn't just about baseball.

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Morning Edition

Sit Next To Rosa Parks At The National Civil Rights Museum

Friday, April 04, 2014

The Memphis, Tenn., landmark reopens after a $28 million renovation aimed at engaging younger generations. The new exhibits immerse visitors in major chapters of the movement.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Why Are These Men Twisting a Fish?

Thursday, April 03, 2014

WNYC
Exploring the lively scene of the 1960s Fulton Fish Market
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How 'Soul Train' Shaped A Generation

Thursday, April 03, 2014

For millions of people in the 1970s, the week was not complete without Soul Train. Writer Nelson George captures the legacy of the show and its creator in his new book The Hippest Trip in America.

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Fishko Files

The Theremin

Thursday, April 03, 2014

More than 90 years ago, the music world was changed by a remarkable musical instrument that still seems new. WNYC's Sara Fishko tells us about an electronic marvel that has its own sound, and its own bizarre story. Here's the next Fishko Files...

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All Things Considered

The Rise And Fall Of Stefan Zweig, Who Inspired 'Grand Budapest Hotel'

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

The Viennese writer was once one of the world's most translated authors, but after his death he was forgotten — until now. Wes Anderson credits Zweig's writing at the end of his latest film.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

What a New Cold War Could Sound Like

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

One thing about the Cold War: It made for some great radio. 

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Morning Edition

Scientists Discover Remnants Of St. Louis' French Colonial Past

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

Archaeologists in St. Louis say they have uncovered the site of a French settlement from 250 years ago. The find supports written evidence that the city was a major commerce center at the time.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Battle to Pass the Civil Rights Act

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 passage has often been credited to the political leadership of President Lyndon Johnson or to the moral force of Martin Luther King. Yet, in The Bill of the Century: The Epic Battle for the Civil Rights Act, author and New York Times editor Clay Risen shows, the story is much bigger than those two men—and includes unceasing grassroots activism, ringing speeches, backroom deal-making, and hand-to-hand legislative combat.

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The Takeaway

Ghosts of Russian History Still Alive in Europe

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

As Russia flexes its muscles in Ukraine, the present looks all too familiar for many Europeans. For them, the ghosts of Russian history are still alive in the region today. 

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All Things Considered

The Harlem Hellfighters: Fighting Racism In The Trenches Of WWI

Tuesday, April 01, 2014

The Harlem Hellfighters broke barriers as the first African-American infantry unit to fight in World War I. Their story is retold in a new graphic novel written by Max Brooks, author of World War Z.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Battle for the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Tuesday, April 01, 2014

Journalist Todd Purdum, recounts the dramatic political battle to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964, in his new book An Idea Whose Time Has Come: Two Presidents, Two Parties, and the Battle for the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which details the legislative maneuvering and the larger-than-life characters who made The Civil Rights Act a reality.

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All Things Considered

Take It From A Local: The Tale Of How Turkey, Texas, Got Its Name

Monday, March 31, 2014

There is no shortage of colorful town names in Texas. We explore the story behind one of them — Turkey, Texas — with a local named Don Turner, a volunteer at the Bob Wills Museum.

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The Journey From 'Colored' To 'Minorities' To 'People Of Color'

Sunday, March 30, 2014

The words used to describe race and ethnicity are ever in flux. A favored term one decade becomes passé the next and not nice soon after that. But, the motivation for change remains constant: Respect.

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