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History

All Things Considered

Memories, And Mended Reputation, Reclaimed From Century-Old Wreckage

Friday, April 25, 2014

Researchers have found the remains of a sunken ship involved in one of San Francisco's worst maritime disasters. The 1888 ship collision had ignited racial passions at a time of rampant anti-Chinese sentiment.

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All Things Considered

For Concentration Camp Doctor, A Lifetime Of Eluding Justice

Friday, April 25, 2014

Aribert Heim was a Nazi concentration camp doctor, yet he evaded prosecution after the war, spending the final years of his life on the run. Nicholas Kulish, co-author of The Eternal Nazi, explains.

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'Don't Touch Me,' Said Canada. 'I Won't!' Said The U.S.A. So They Moved 20 Feet Apart

Friday, April 25, 2014

Canada and the U.S.A. agreed to create a 20-foot-wide corridor between them that runs for 5,500 continuous miles. Cartographers drew the line straight, but engineers built it crooked. Take a look.

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Cleveland Fans Confront Racist Traditions

Friday, April 25, 2014

Native American-themed mascots are at the center of a growing national debate, including the Cleveland Indians mascot, Chief Wahoo. Sports blogger Pete Pattakkos talks about pushing for change.

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'Blood Victory' In Medical Research Dispute

Friday, April 25, 2014

The Havasupai Native American tribe celebrated Blood Victory Day this week. That's the anniversary of their legal victory over researchers who misused members' blood samples without proper consent.

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Is Anti-Semitism In Ukraine A Real Threat?

Friday, April 25, 2014

Tensions remain high in Ukraine, and there are also concerns that anti-Semitism is taking root during the political crisis. Richard Brodsky of Demos discusses the issue.

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What's Next For Divided Supreme Court?

Friday, April 25, 2014

The Supreme Court handed down major decisions on some controversial cases this week. David Savage of the Los Angeles Times and Amy Howe of SCOTUSblog discuss the rulings and what's next.

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The Ten Commandments In The Digital Age

Thursday, April 24, 2014

From adultery to envy, is social media making it harder to honor the Ten Commandments? Paul Edwards of The Deseret News talks about its series on how the Commandments fit into American life today.

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On Being

Jaroslav Pelikan — The Need for Creeds [remix]

Thursday, April 24, 2014

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On Being

[Unedited] Jaroslav Pelikan With Krista Tippett

Thursday, April 24, 2014

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Bake Bread Like A Pioneer In Appalachia ... With No Yeast

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Bacteria can make a bread rise and give it a cheesy flavor. That's the secret ingredient in salt rising bread, which dates to the late 1700s in Appalachia, when bakers didn't have yeast on hand.

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Morning Edition

Race To Unearth Civil War-Era Artifacts Before Developer Digs In

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Archaeologists in South Carolina are excavating a Union officer prisoner-of-war camp site, hoping to find historical artifacts before they are buried under new construction.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Bert Berns and the Dirty Business of Rhythm and Blues

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Music critic and reporter Joel Selvin gives an account of the golden age of rhythm and blues of the early 1960s and the tragic story of songwriter and record producer Bert Berns, whose heart was damaged by rheumatic fever when he was young, and he wasn’t expected to live to see 21. Selvin's new book Here Comes the Night: The Dark Soul of Bert Berns and the Dirty Business of Rhythm and Blues is about Berns's career working alongside all the greats of the era—Jerry Leiber and Mike Stroller, Burt Bacharach and Phil Spector, Gerry Goffin and Carole King, and anyone who was anyone in New York rhythm and blues.

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All Things Considered

The Wonders Of The Year 2014, As Told By Isaac Asimov

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

To mark the 50th anniversary of the 1964 New York World's Fair, we turn back to some predictions that The New York Times commissioned Isaac Asimov to make on the occasion. He got many things right.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Connie Converse Walking In the Dark Introduction

Monday, April 21, 2014

Connie Converse Walking In the Dark, is a special edition of WNYC's Spinning On Air with David Garland. Listen now to many of Connie's songs for the first time, her story with interviews, commentary, and readings from her letters, journals, and poetry from a November 25, 2012 broadcast.

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Library Of Congress, How Could You Forget Run-D.M.C?

Monday, April 21, 2014

The Library of Congress recently added 25 new recordings to its National Recording Registry, but none of them were hip-hop or rap songs. Did it miss a beat?

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Happy Earth Day - Now Move Your Car

Monday, April 21, 2014

WNYC
On the first Earth Day - that would be April 22, 1970 - Mayor John V. Lindsay implores New Yorkers to be more thoughtful with their parking.
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The Brian Lehrer Show

A Social History of God

Monday, April 21, 2014

Karen Armstrong, author of best-selling books on religion and the founder of the Charter for Compassion, addresses the question: How are religious concepts and practices different at different times for individuals and cultures? And we ask immigrants to call in and discuss how God is viewed differently in your country of origin than in the US.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Getting to Know Jesus

Monday, April 21, 2014

James Martin, SJ, a Jesuit priest, editor at large of America magazine, and author of Jesus: A Pilgrimage (HarperOne, 2014), talks about the historical and spiritual Jesus.

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A Legume With Many Names: The Story Of 'Goober'

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Today, everyone calls it a peanut. Southerners might also say 'goober.' But before the Civil War, there were a dozen names for that humble legume, and it wasn't at all clear which one would win out.

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