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Sleep's Mortal Enemy: Screens

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

We don't sleep like nature intended, and technology is to blame. From the gaslight to the smartphone, technological innovation has been knocking the human body clock out of sync with nature. 

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Christopher Columbus Ship The Santa Maria May Have Been Found

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

The ship sank in 1492 after hitting reefs off the Haitian coast. Undersea explorer Barry Clifford says he's working with Haiti's government to carry out an archaeological excavation of the wreck.

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Morning Edition

Turnspit Dogs: The Rise And Fall Of The Vernepator Cur

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

The turnspit dog was once an essential part of every large kitchen in Britain. Bred to run in a wheel that turned a roasting spit, the small but strong dogs ensured that the meat cooked evenly.

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The Takeaway

Tracing An Ill-Fated Voyage to Escape the Nazis

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Today marks the 75th anniversary of a ship setting sail. It's a ship you probably haven't heard of, but one that tells an important and dark story about our country's past.

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Congressman Clyburn Reflects On A Life Of 'Blessed Experiences'

Monday, May 12, 2014

South Carolina Representative James Clyburn's new memoir Blessed Experiences: Genuinely Southern, Proudly Black shares lessons learned on his way from the Jim Crow South to a top spot on Capitol Hill.

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Radio Diaries

#14: The Long Shadow of Forrest Carter

Monday, May 12, 2014

Asa Carter and Forrest Carter couldn't have been more different. But they shared a secret.

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Recall That Ice Cream Truck Song? We Have Unpleasant News For You

Sunday, May 11, 2014

This is the story of why our beloved ice cream truck plays blackface minstrel music that sends kids dashing into homes in a Pavlovian frenzy searching for money to buy a Popsicle.

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All Things Considered

Descendants Of Chinese Laborers Reclaim Railroad's History

Saturday, May 10, 2014

America's first transcontinental railroad was completed with a golden spike 145 years ago. Thousands of Chinese workers helped build it, but their faces were left out of photos from that historic day.

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Transportation Nation

Last Call for the Bar Car

Friday, May 09, 2014

Like so many venerable New York traditions, Metro North's bar car from Manhattan to Connecticut has gone the way of the Redbird.

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How A Persian-American Love Story Got Its Start In Harlem

Friday, May 09, 2014

Tell Me More's Davar Ardalan remembers her grandparents, who met in 1920s Harlem. Their story, Ardalan writes, "could be a page out of a Persian epic."

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Rat Pack's Sammy Davis Jr. Lives On Through Daughter's Stories

Thursday, May 08, 2014

Many people considered Sammy Davis Junior the greatest entertainer of his era. His daughter Tracey Davis shares stories from her book Sammy Davis Jr.: A Personal Journey with My Father.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How Tammany Hall Created Modern American Politics

Wednesday, May 07, 2014

New York’s Tammany Hall is synonymous with corruption and machine politics, but journalist Terry Golway argues that reputation is somewhat undeserved. He dismantles the stereotypes and looks at some of the progressive ideas that emerged from Tammany Hall.

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Viewers Not Laughing About SNL Slavery Skit

Tuesday, May 06, 2014

A skit about slavery by Saturday Night Live's Leslie Jones outraged many of the show's black viewers. NPR television critic Eric Deggans talks about the joke and the backlash.

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Morning Edition

Richmond, Va., Wrangling Over Future Of Historic Slave Trade Site

Tuesday, May 06, 2014

More than 300,000 African and African-American slaves were sold in Shockoe Bottom. Today, residents and city officials are debating how to preserve the area: Memorial or stadium and museum?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Writer Stefan Zweig in Exile

Monday, May 05, 2014

By the 1930s, Stefan Zweig had become the most widely translated living author in the world, but after Hitler rose to power, Zweig became an increasingly isolated exile, and in 1942, he killed himself. Biographer George Prochnik tells his story.

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How A Disgraced Reporter Tested The Public's Trust In Journalism

Monday, May 05, 2014

New York Times rising star Jayson Blair was busted in spring 2003 for plagiarizing and making up stories. Filmmaker Samantha Grant's new documentary, A Fragile Trust, sheds light on the scandal.

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The Takeaway

When the Map No Longer Knows Your Home

Monday, May 05, 2014

This November marks 25 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall. For the millions of people living in the German Democratic Republic, that day marked the end of their country—literally overnight the GDR disappeared.

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On The Media

TLDR #24 - The Million Dollar Homepage

Monday, May 05, 2014

In 2005, Alex Tew was a 21-year-old entrepreneur who wanted to make a million dollars before college. The only problem was he had literally nothing of value to sell. So he made The Million Dollar Homepage -- possibly the most ambitiously garish website ever created.

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Morning Edition

Extra! Read All About It: 'Girl Stunt Reporter' Turns 150

Monday, May 05, 2014

Nellie Bly of the New York World was one of the most famous "girl stunt reporters" of her time. Now, the first ever edited collection of her work is being released, in honor of her 150th birthday.

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Artists Bring Back The Human Zoo To Teach A Lesson In History

Sunday, May 04, 2014

In 1914, 80 African men, women and children were brought to Oslo for the sole purpose of being gazed upon in a thatched hut village for five months by Norwegian natives.

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