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History

The Leonard Lopate Show

War and Gold

Thursday, May 29, 2014

War-waging and financial debt have long been intertwined, and Kwasi Kwarteng looks at the history from the French Revolution to the emergence of modern-day China.

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The Takeaway

Exploring D-Day’s Underwater Secrets 70 Years On

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

D-Day was the largest military operation of its kind. As the 70th anniversary of this epic battle approaches, The Takeaway considers the extraordinary technology and engineering that contributed to the ultimate success of the invasion.

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Nikki Giovanni Honors Her Late Friend Maya Angelou

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Legendary poet Maya Angelou died Wednesday at the age of 86. Poet Nikki Giovanni, who was a friend, remembers her life and work.

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The Takeaway

Maya Angelou's Friend Nikki Giovanni Remembers the Legendary Poet

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Poet Maya Angelou died today at her home in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. She was 86-years-old. The Takeaway spoke to poet Nikki Giovanni about her 40-plus-year friendship with Maya Angelou. "When you talk about who lived a full and a good and a complete life, you come back to Maya,” Giovanni says.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Cycling, Doping, and Designing Dresses

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

American cyclist “Big George” Hincapie talks about competing in the Tour de France a record 17 times, cycling in the Olympics, and his role in the Lance Armstrong doping case. Con Coughlin discusses Winston Churchill’s early military career. Curators Harold Koda and Jan Reeder talk about the exhibit “Charles James: Beyond Fashion,” on show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. And our “word maven” Patricia T. O’Conner takes your calls and questions about the idiosyncrasies of the English language.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Churchill's First War

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

An account of Winston Churchill's early military career fighting in the 1890 Afghan campaign offers revealing parallels into today's war in Afghanistan.

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The Takeaway

Have We Found the Line Between Sound and Noise?

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Sorting noise from music, street soundtrack from din is an old argument. 'Noise' can be cancelled with fancy new headphones. But is the canceling of noise also the erasing of culture?

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Ta-Nehisi Coates On Reparations: 'We're Going To Be In For A Fight'

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

In his latest think piece, Coates writes that "until the U.S. pays its moral debts to African-Americans, our country will never be whole." He discusses his latest essay for The Atlantic.

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Morning Edition

How Soviet Kitchens Became Hotbeds Of Dissent And Culture

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

After Stalin's death, people in the Soviet Union could begin to debate politics again without fear of repression. This "thawing" took place in private kitchens, where music and art flourished, too.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Diaries of Diplomat George F. Kennan

Monday, May 26, 2014

America’s most respected foreign policy thinker of the 20th century, who came up with “containment,” America’s Cold War strategy, kept a diary for 88 years.

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He Gave His Life For The Nation And His Name To An Airport

Saturday, May 24, 2014

Airports are often named after politicians or celebrities, but who is Chicago's airport named for? Few know the story of WWII fighter pilot and Medal of Honor recipient Butch O'Hare.

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Wrigley Field, The Much-Imitated, Never Duplicated Ballpark

Saturday, May 24, 2014

Wrigley Field in Chicago, home to the hapless Cubs, turns 100 this year. NPR's Scott Simon visits Wrigley and talks to baseball great Ernie Banks and others about the legendary ballpark.

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'Normal Heart' Teaches New Generation About The Early Years Of AIDS

Saturday, May 24, 2014

Ryan Murphy — the producer behind Glee and American Horror Story — has adapted Larry Kramer's 1985 play into a movie for HBO. "So many young people don't know this part of our history," Murphy says.

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Gastrodiplomacy Gives Foreign Chefs A Fresh Take And Taste Of America

Saturday, May 24, 2014

The State Department has a new exchange program for culinary professionals. A delegation from the Middle East and Africa recently discovered there's more to American cuisine than fast food.

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All Things Considered

Congress To Award Highest Honor To Army's Only Latino Unit

Friday, May 23, 2014

A new bill passed by Congress would award Puerto Rico's 65th Infantry Regiment the Congressional Gold Medal, which has been presented to the Navajo Code Talkers, Tuskegee Airmen and other units.

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530 Years After Death, Richard III To Be Reburied In Leicester

Friday, May 23, 2014

Descendants of the king had sued to block his burial in Leicester Cathedral, arguing his roots were in York. But a court ruled Friday his remains can stay in the city where they were found in 2012.

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The Takeaway

What Putin Can Learn from 'War and Peace'

Friday, May 23, 2014

The author of “Give War and Peace a Chance: Tolstoyan Wisdom for Trouble Times” explains why now more than ever, Vladimir Putin should be reading Russia’s most famous literary masterpiece.

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Morning Edition

Jacqueline Kennedy's Letters No Longer On Auction Block

Friday, May 23, 2014

An announcement may come soon over who will get personal letters written by the former first lady. A college in Ireland had planned to put them up for auction but they are no longer for sale.

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On The Media

9/11 Enters the Realm of Museum

Friday, May 23, 2014

The opening of the 9/11 Memorial Museum on the footprint of the twin towers marks a new phase of remembering the events of that day and their ongoing impact. Brooke and producer Meara Sharma visit the museum on opening day and talk to designer Jake Barton about creating an experience for visitors that tells a story as well as pays tribute.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Murder, Madness, Tyranny, and Perversion in Ancient Rome

Friday, May 23, 2014

Classical historian James Romm tells the juicy story of Seneca, a famous writer and philosopher in ancient Rome who was appointed as tutor to 12-year-old Nero, the future emperor of Rome.

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