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History

The Takeaway

Red Lipstick: From Suffragettes to Chanel

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Red lipstick is as en vogue as ever this summer. But did you know that behind that color is a rich history steeped in identity, self-expression, and liberation?

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Remembering The Victories Of The 1964 Civil Rights Act

Monday, June 16, 2014

Law professor Randall Kennedy's memories of the Jim Crow South include his mother packing food to avoid stopping on long trips. He says the symbolism of these little moments is still important today.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

James Joyce's Ulysses: 'Obscene, Lewd, and Lascivious'

Monday, June 16, 2014

The book that literary critics now consider the most important novel in the English language was once illegal to own, sell, advertise or purchase in most of the English-speaking world. But James Joyce, publishers, and other authors fought for the freedom to publish it.

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The Takeaway

U.S. Survivor of Deadly Irish Orphanage Speaks Out

Monday, June 16, 2014

North Carolina resident Peter Ferris Cochran was born at St. Mary’s unwed mothers home in Ireland, a now-haunting place where the bodies of 800 babies, long-dead, were found in septic tank last week.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Big Blue and the Big Blue Book

Monday, June 16, 2014

IBM was once the leader in technology and innovation, and Robert Cringely explains how it has been eclipsed by companies like Apple and predicts what Big Blue’s future may be. We'll look at how James Joyce’s Ulysses not only changed the novel, but was also banned and deemed “obscene.” Lisa See talks about her novel, China Dolls. Gerald Felix Warburg looks back at his four decades behind the scenes of Washington politics.

The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: Turmoil in Iraq, a World Cup Rivalry Rematch, and an Unsettling Discovery

Monday, June 16, 2014

1. Christiane Amanpour: This May Be 'The End of Iraq' | 2. World Cup Rivalry Rematch: NYC Immigrant Weighs in As His Countries Compete | 3. Grammy Winner Loudon Wainwright on His New Album | 4. Iraq: A Nightmare Coming True?

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All Things Considered

On The Field And In Politics, Socrates' Legacy Lives On

Sunday, June 15, 2014

The 1980s Brazilian soccer star known simply by his first name, Socrates, is still revered in the country for his playing. But he is also remembered as a brave political dissenter who opposed Brazil's military dictatorship. NPR's Arun Rath talks to sports writer Dave Zirin about the legacy of Socrates.

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From Former Slaves To Writers, Civilians, Too, Rest At Arlington

Sunday, June 15, 2014

Arlington National Cemetery turns 150 years old on Sunday. It's known as the resting place of war heroes, but extraordinary civilians are buried there as well — here are the stories of three of them.

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50 Years Ago, Freedom Summer Began By Training For Battle

Saturday, June 14, 2014

Thousands of civil rights activists descended upon Mississippi in 1964 to help register African-American voters. For many, the first stop was intensive training — including how to take a beating.

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The Chilling Reality Of Cold War Nuclear Survival

Saturday, June 14, 2014

On June 14, 1954, the United States conducted its first civil defense test. When the alarm was sounded, millions headed for cover, believing they might actually survive a nuclear attack.

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The Takeaway

The Takeaway Weekender: Film, Fatherhood, Music, and JFK's Unspoken Speech

Saturday, June 14, 2014

Welcome to The Takeaway Weekender!

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Radiolab

An Animated Adventure from Minute Physics

Friday, June 13, 2014

Last month, we had our very first (unofficial) artist-in-residence at Radiolab: Henry Reich, the brains behind MinutePhysics. Henry took a story from Craig Childs, the adventure-loving, cliff-scaling explorer from our Things episode, and animated it in trademark Minute Physics style: magic markers, stick figures, ...

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Fresh Air

'Lawrence' Of Arabia: From Archaeologist To War Hero

Friday, June 13, 2014

Scott Anderson's book explains how British officer T.E. Lawrence used his knowledge of Arab culture and medieval history to advance British causes. Originally broadcast Aug. 19, 2013.

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The World's Watching Soccer, But Basketball Is On The Barbershop's Brain

Friday, June 13, 2014

The most popular global sporting event, the World Cup, kicked off this week in Brazil. But the Barbershop guys are fired up about games closer to home: the NBA finals.

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Remembering Ruby Dee: 'Think Of Me And Feel Encouraged'

Friday, June 13, 2014

In remembrance of the life of actress and activist Ruby Dee, Tell Me More presents an encore broadcast of Michel Martin's 2007 interview with the legendary actress and activist.

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Radiolab

≤ kg

Friday, June 13, 2014

A plum-sized lump of metal takes us from the French Revolution to an underground bunker in Maryland as we try to weigh the way we weigh the world around us.

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The Takeaway

Stefan Zweig: An Inspired Life and a Tragic Fall

Friday, June 13, 2014

In George Prochnik's new book, "The Impossible Exile Stefan Zweig and the End of the World," Prochnik tells the story of a man that led an inspired life and ultimately was taken down by a tragic fall.

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The Takeaway

Obama Makes Historic Visit to Indian Country

Friday, June 13, 2014

President Obama will visit the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe today in what is only the third visit to Indian country by a sitting president in the last 80 years. Like many reservations, Standing Rock faces unemployment and poverty rates that far exceed the rest of the United States.

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Morning Edition

40 Years On, Woodward And Bernstein Recall Reporting On Watergate

Friday, June 13, 2014

The now-legendary reporters revisit the famous D.C. complex as they remember writing All The President's Men, their detective story-style account of uncovering Richard Nixon's scandalous conspiracy.

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Morning Edition

Remembering A Civil Rights Swim-In: 'It Was A Milestone'

Friday, June 13, 2014

Fifty years ago, J.T. Johnson and Al Lingo jumped into a whites-only pool in Florida as part of a civil rights protest. They were taken to jail — after the hotel owner poured acid into the water.

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